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Nothing but Rye


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I decided on a new technique to help me to better appreciate the diversity of spirits. For an entire week, I kept to a particular style of whisky. This gave me a chance to better identify nuances of each bottling by having them in different orders, after different meals (and before).

This was my Rye week, so I stuck with Van Winkle 13, Sazerac 18, Old Potrero (1yo Spirit & 3yo Straight), Lot 40 (Canadian) and Alberta Premium (100% Canadian Rye).

I actually enjoyed each more than I had previously (except the VW13 which was already too good to be true). It seems each one helped me to better appreciate the others.

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That is very interesting. I have never really had rye whiskey, except the cheapest sort (I think it was Fleishman's, way back in the early 70's). And, here in Alabama, the only thing I have seen is Jim Beam Rye, and I'm not inclined to try that.

But the ones you are tasting sound very intriguing and attractive. I can only wish!

What style are you tasting, next week?

Tim

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I'll probably go to rye based bourbon (not single barrel or cask strength) next time I do a week. I'll also probably do: American single malts, single barrel/vintage, wheaters, cask strength, and Tennessee.

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bluesbassdad

The term "American single malts" piqued my curiousity.

Please elaborate for the benefit of this relative newbie.

Yours truly,

Dave "This time last year, I still thought Jack Daniel's was bourbon! crazy.gif" Morefield

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There are a growing number of American Single Malts. These are produced from 100% malted grain, usually barley. They have wide ranging flavor profiles. None I've tried taste like bourbon. Old Potrero is a single malt rye with a least 4 or 5 different cask strength versions. The almost 4 year old "single malt straight rye" is one of the few (only?) single malts to be acorded a "straight" designation. It tastes a bit like other young straight ryes. McCarthy's single malt is heavily peated and tastes a lot like Scotch. Peregrine Rock, St. George (both US), and Glen Breton (Canada) all have a liqeuer-like quality IMHO. Most of these are more pricey than bourbons which taste better, but they do provide variety. Try them a a bar or tasting before buying bottle.

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