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TimmyBoston
08-03-2006, 23:57
Today, I went to the liquor store and come home with a few microbrews. I bought an Anchor Porter, Dogfish Head Brewery 60-minute IPA, Dogfish 120-minute IPA, and a Stone Ruination IPA. As you can probably tell I am a huge fan of IPA's. What beers are you all drinking, out there these days? I love beer and I love whiskey, but I'm curous about the beers you are enjoying. Maybe I can get some good tips.

barturtle
08-04-2006, 00:13
Well after coming back from Europe and spending time in both the Nethrlands and Belgium, I've been a bit spoiled and unwilling to drink anything not made in Belgium, however this evening, after visitng a local bourbon bar, I hopped on down to Bluegrass Brewing Co. and had a cask APA, when my two lady friends arived they got the same and then we all split a flight. We got the flight to decide what we were going to take to NC with us while we go visit some friends(and see their first-born for the first time) who are originally from the area. We decided on Dark Star Porter and their Nut Brown Ale. They just wouldn't give us any of the cask in a growler to take with us:smiley_acbt:

contrarian
08-04-2006, 11:33
You have some of my favorites, Tim. I tend to drink more IPA's and Hefeweisen in summer.

IPA:
Stone IPA
Deschutes Inversion IPA (a huge improvement IMO over their previous IPA, Quail Springs)
Rogue Brutal Bitter

Hefe:
Franziskaner
Schneider Weisse

Other highlights from the summer: 04 and 05 Alaskan Smoked Porter (my favorite) and Unibroue La Fin du Monde

Jeff

bluesbassdad
08-04-2006, 11:34
In the refrigerator right now I have nothing that is likely to inspire you -- Bud, Full Sail Amber Ale and Liberty Ale.

I bought the Bud to go along with the Evan Williams (non-vintage) bourbon I bought recently, all a result of pondering the idea of living down to my income in regards to alcoholic beverages. The combination was more enjoyable than I expected.

The Full Sail is a brew that I really enjoyed on tap at a place in Long Beach, CA where my blues band gigged a few times. Unfortunately, the bottled version did nothing to help me relive those fun times.

The Libery Ale used to be a favorite. Now it seems too hoppy and bitter for drinking without food. My tastes have turned toward more malty brews.

When I really want to treat myself, I go to the nearby Prescott Brewing Company (http://www.prescottbrewingcompany.com/). At each visit I have the Liquid Amber and one other for variety. I can't say their beers are better than those of other micros, but fresh beer always seems better, whether it is or not.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

ratcheer
08-04-2006, 15:14
I don't buy much expensive beer, although I love it.

Right now, and for the past year or so, my refrigerator is stocked with Yuengling Traditional Lager. $16 a case at Sam's Club (the Wal-Mart warehouse store, not the Chicago wine and spirits store).

Tim

Frodo
08-04-2006, 16:05
Innis & Gunn. Scottish ale aged in old whisky barrels...

Lacking this, Guinnis, or Grolsh will do fine!

BourbonJoe
08-04-2006, 16:05
Right now, and for the past year or so, my refrigerator is stocked with Yuengling Traditional Lager.
Tim

Tim,
The Yuengling brewery is 20 miles up the road from me. It is the oldest brewery in the USA and still family owned. The Yuenglings are very nice, down to earth people. Keep on drinkin that Yuengling.
Joe :usflag:

OscarV
08-04-2006, 17:01
I change beer brands with the weather.
I like porters in the winter, also Grolsch, made in Holland is a very good full bodied beer.
In real hot summers, like wev'e had here lately, an ice cold Molson Golden is perfect.
But if I had to pick one for anytime, than Czechvar from the Czech Republic, does the trick.

ratcheer
08-04-2006, 19:34
Tim,
The Yuengling brewery is 20 miles up the road from me. It is the oldest brewery in the USA and still family owned. The Yuenglings are very nice, down to earth people. Keep on drinkin that Yuengling.
Joe :usflag:
Will do, Joe. I just had one a few minutes ago and I don't see any reason to stop. It really hits the spot. :yum:

Tim

T47
08-04-2006, 19:39
I am still drinking Redhook ESB, I find it very refreshing on a hot day.

NorCalBoozer
08-04-2006, 19:41
negra modelo. I really like it.......for now. I'm nortoriuos for finding a beer I really like then after a few weeks or months I get bored of it. Don't know why that is. Only seems to happen with beer.

I will always go back to my roots though, which is Sierra Nevada Brewery.

TNbourbon
08-04-2006, 19:43
Don't miss the Flying Dogs, from Denver. I tapped a quarter-cask of the pale ale, the brand favorite, at the Sampler, to good response. Personally, I like the amber lager, Old Scratch. Fine with food, not too bitter to drink without accompaniment.
Due credit to Cliff (Barrel_Proof), who turned me on to these brews after a lifetime of beerlessness.

TimmyBoston
08-05-2006, 00:57
I'd say my favorite beers are:

Sam Adams Summer Ale (In the Summer)
Sam Adams Light - one of my favorite lights
Amstel Light
Anchor Porter
Arrogant Bastard Ale - a great malty ale
Stone IPA
Ruination IPA - another stone product

I"m sure I'll think of a few more as time goes by or maybe try some of your recommendations and find some new ones.

Nebraska
08-06-2006, 09:53
Currently I'm revisiting some past favorites:

August Schell caramel bock, new ulm,MN
" " Schamalt's Alt
" " Firebrick

Bohemia (used to love this, still do)
Leinenkugel's Red

wadewood
08-06-2006, 14:50
Here is a good list of Top 10 summer beers to try:

http://www.novusvinum.com/beer/features/top10summer_beers.html

smokinjoe
08-06-2006, 20:36
I'm not a beer officianado, so to speak, but I do drink it all year long. If you ask "What beers am I drinking these days"?" In the Summer, on a hot and muggy day, not much beats a plain old Corona. Particularly down at the beach. Many folks poo poo Corona, but for me, it sure cuts the thirst this time of year.

JOE

elkdoggydog
08-06-2006, 21:51
Red Hook ESB here, too. Good call, Todd.

Whiskey Willie
08-07-2006, 07:22
Samuel Adams Boston Lager and Boston Ale are my favorite brews. Once the weather cools, I will lay in the supply of Bell's Kalamazoo Stout.

scopenut
08-07-2006, 08:29
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, year 'round.

Kevin

chasking
08-07-2006, 12:24
Earlier this year I discovered my new favorite beer: Okocim Porter! Made in Poland. This is the best beer I've had. The only other that is in the same league is McEwan's Scotch Ale. Both huge, chewy beers. An Okocim Porter is damn near a meal.

TomH
08-07-2006, 17:02
Sprecher Pipers Scotch Ale
Sapient Trip Ale
Piraat Ale

Tom

jeff
08-08-2006, 15:17
Well, recently in California I enjoyed beer from Deschutes brewery: one of my favorites. Black Butte Porter to be exact. Unfortunately they don't distribute east of Colorado (good for you Dane!), so that's another reason for a trip again next year:lol:

Right now I'm enjoying my favorite IPA: Bell's Two Hearted Ale. Named after the Hemingway short-story, this beer pack a lot of Centennial hop flavor and aroma with just the right amount of bitterness. It's a great summer beer, but I enjoy it year-round. In fact, all of Bell's beers are very very good. Ed and I enjoyed a mini-keg of the Oberon wheat ale a few weeks ago and it was fantastic, especially with his wonderful seafood boil. :yum:

Gillman
08-08-2006, 17:23
Jeff, did you sample the Black Butter on draft or in the bottle? I had some in the bottle on the recent trip and saw it on draft at a beer bar in San Francisco.

I happened also upon a cask-conditioned porter made by a company called English Ales in Marin which was particularly good. Cask porter and stout (real ale) is really quite different from filtered draft ales good as those can be.

I hope the running marathon went well for you and Leslie.


Gary

robbyvirus
08-08-2006, 22:14
Out here in San Francisco I drink a lot of Anchor Steam. All their beers are great...Anchor Steam, Liberty Ale, Anchor Small Beer, Anchor Bock. I also drink cheap Mexican beer in cans, like Tecate or Modelo...great for a hot day.

jeff
08-09-2006, 05:21
I had a couple of Anchor Steam beers last weekend while enjoying North Beach Pizza. I kinda wanted to get to the brewery, but I never made it south of Market. I did try out the SF Brewing co. Nice Pale ale and Alt.

Gary,

I bought a six-pack of Black Butte porter while at a grocery store with Jim and Stephanie. Jim was grilling steaks for dinner and I needed a break from wine after a day of hard tasting. I had a couple at Jim's and I had the rest over the week. I really like Deschutes and I wish I could ship some in.

The race went very well. 57 degrees at start and the scenery was gorgeous. Running out-and-back over the GG Bridge was an experience I'll remember for a long time and, luckily there was no fog even at 6:30am to dampen the view. I was however underprepared for the hills. I'm glad we did it, but I don't think I'll do it again :lol:

Gillman
08-09-2006, 05:33
Thanks and I'll say this, Anchor Steam is still the one to beat in SF.

I had it on draft at Tommy's Joynt (Geary and Van Ness, old-style bar with a vaguely Swiss or German motif now obscured by time and Americanisation).

Anchor Steam's flavour is best expressed on draft but the bottled one is good too especially I imagine in the Bay Area. Good to hear the San Francisco Brewing Company is still going strong, it is one of the early brewpubs in the U.S.

Gary

jeff
08-09-2006, 05:41
The SF brewing co was indeed going strong, though the building is aging and has the strange odor of decades of grease and lacquer :lol: The pulled-pork sandwich they served was even better than the beer :yum: We stopped in for lunch and a couple beers and then ran into the North Beach Jazz Festival just a little up the road in Washington Square. Sat in the lawn and listened to some good music. It was a really good day!

robbyvirus
08-09-2006, 23:56
Thanks and I'll say this, Anchor Steam is still the one to beat in SF.

I had it on draft at Tommy's Joynt (Geary and Van Ness, old-style bar with a vaguely Swiss or German motif now obscured by time and Americanisation).


Yes, Tommy's Joynt is still going strong. It's been there forever. A great place to go for a cold beer, and a heaping plate of sliced turkey and overcooked vegetables. A true San Francisco tradition!

TimmyBoston
08-10-2006, 01:16
I had some Bass Ale tonight. I had forgotten how much I like it.

gothbat
08-12-2006, 18:00
As always I've been drinking some of my favorite Belgian saison ale from Fantome. Unfortunately the store by me doesn't seem to be getting it in any more though and all they really have left is the Strange Ghost variety which I like but not nearly as much as others from this line. Some pics below. The first is the Strange Ghost I’ll drink tonight next to the Grolsch that I’m going to have with the steamers I’m about to cook up, next is Fantome Babillard which is the first Fantome I tried, unfortunately they don’t make it anymore. The label is the reason I tried it, the guy on it looks like me in weekend mode. :) Finally we have the Fantome I should be drinking now, Ete (which I assume means summer). Gonna have to talk to the beer guy next time I’m at the store.



http://img141.imageshack.us/img141/2676/tonightsu1.jpghttp://img141.imageshack.us/img141/6376/babillardkv9.jpghttp://img141.imageshack.us/img141/9550/etehh2.jpg

TnSquire
08-12-2006, 18:15
I like High Life. How can you not like the Champagne of Beers?

Ambernecter
08-14-2006, 12:43
Nelson Mandela is Cockney slang for Stella (Artois) larger.

When I was in the British Army (Airborne) there was a T shirt that had a cartoon barmaid wearing a T Shirt saying "Free Nelson Mandela." The soldier in the cartoon said "I'll have 2 pints of Nelson Mandela please."

Not particularly funny, but years later when he was freed from jail the cartoon changed to the barmaid's T shirt saying "Nelson Mandela is free!"

The soldier of course ordered the 2 pints of Free Nelson Mandela - Genius!

I do drink Stella when out on the town and at 5% it is also lovingly referred to as "wifebeater!" I don't have a wife and do not condone domestic violence btw. As my father always tells me Stella is a huge export out of Belgium but none of the Belgians drink it!

Gillman
08-14-2006, 13:16
They used to drink it, when it had more taste. :) When I first went to Belgium 20 years ago Stella Artois was a tasty beer. It had a flowery hop nose and taste. Today it is much more bland. I think it was weakened in flavour (not abv) to appeal to a broader market. The strategy seems to have worked.

Gary

Nebraska
08-14-2006, 17:16
We have a semi-local small brewery (Spilker) that was putting out some mighty fine beers. They had "growlers" half gallon jugs that you brought back each time and exchanged for a new one.

My all time favorite was "Hopeluia" an unbelievably hoppy beer. For some insane reason they decided to put a stop to the growlers and put it in cans. Yuk.

ratcheer
08-14-2006, 18:14
They used to drink it, when it had more taste. :) When I first went to Belgium 20 years ago Stella Artois was a tasty beer. It had a flowery hop nose and taste. Today it is much more bland. I think it was weakened in flavour (not abv) to appeal to a broader market. The strategy seems to have worked.

Gary

The mass American brewers had been pursuing that strategy for about the past 30 years, but they finally went too far and are now gradually putting the flavor back - according to a Wall Street Journal article I read a few weeks ago.

Tim

CrispyCritter
08-14-2006, 21:48
As my father always tells me Stella is a huge export out of Belgium but none of the Belgians drink it!
LOL! Sort of like the word on the street that few Australians drink Foster's. :)

Funny thing is, my sister absolutely loves Stella Artois - and she first encountered it when she was in England.

As for me, my favorite Belgian beer is Chimay Blue Label. However, it's not something that I drink often.

Gillman
08-14-2006, 23:37
Well, the good part is such beers provide a bridge to more flavourful ones (for those who continue). I saw the other day some people drinking draft Hoegaarden, which used to be a tiny brewery in Belgium and now is owned by InBev (formerly Interbrew) and internationally distributed. I never thought this would ever happen, so mass taste is (slowly) changing and as Tim says there is a swing back to products with flavour. The microbrewery renaissance showed that. I always felt if, say Budweiser and Michelob were brewed to something approaching their original American specs people would welcome the change. I think the part of the beer world that wants a bland taste would stick with a light beer or one of the mass market imports (say Corona).

Gary

TimmyBoston
08-16-2006, 22:23
Lately, I've been drinking Anchor Porter. I like it as much as any beer I've been drinking lately. It has a chocolate creaminess that blends really well with food. Has anyone had any of the other Anchor products? Do you have a recommendations?

Also I picked up a bottle of Dogfish Head's 120 minute IPA, I haven't opened it, has anyone had it so I know what to expect?, other than a helluva lotta hops, I do know that much. Also any glassware recommendations? I've had the 90 minute from a snifter, but it's too sweet IMO, but from another glass it's resplendent. But the it has a 90 ibu rating as opposed to the 120's 120 ibu rating, so that glass may work very well and the alcohol is 20%.

Thanks much.

jeff
08-17-2006, 04:14
Lately, I've been drinking Anchor Porter. I like it as much as any beer I've been drinking lately. It has a chocolate creaminess that blends really well with food. Has anyone had any of the other Anchor products? Do you have a recommendations?

Also I picked up a bottle of Dogfish Head's 120 minute IPA, I haven't opened it, has anyone had it so I know what to expect?, other than a helluva lotta hops, I do know that much. Also any glassware recommendations? I've had the 90 minute from a snifter, but it's too sweet IMO, but from another glass it's resplendent. But the it has a 90 ibu rating as opposed to the 120's 120 ibu rating, so that glass may work very well and the alcohol is 20%.

Thanks much.
I picked up a sixer of Anchor's Liberty Ale for the first time. I'm really enjoying it. Crisp with just the right balance of hops and malt for me. FWIW, I think the dogfish head IPAs have become sweeter over the last couple years. I have not had the 120, but the 60 and 90 are too sweet for me anymore and the hops are very understated for an american-style IPA, IMHO. Maybe you'll have better luck with the 120.

Gillman
08-17-2006, 04:38
Liberty Ale was the first modern craft American IPA. Fritz Maytag used a large amount of North West hops to reproduce an old British IPA beer and created something different and much emulated by later brewers.

I like this kind of beer style when served well-chilled. I remember trying emerging examples in California in the early years of the craft brew renaissance. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale was one, still very much around and there are many others. I still associate the taste with windy ocean-side cafes (an orangey, grapefruit-like taste).

By the way, Fritz Maytag was kind enough to reply to a note I sent Anchor about the Hostalings single malt whiskey (made from all-malted rye). He said no juniper or other flavorings were added and the flavors in the whiskey are solely the result of its extended maturation in non-charred oak.

The original Dutch genever, a low-proof distillate made from a mainly-rye mash, had (and some still does) a marked juniper taste. However this is because juniper was added. I am now wondering if pot still rye whiskey which is long aged in non-charred wood typically acquires a juniper-like scent. If it does, this may explain why juniper was added to young rye spirit (to emulate the effects of long aging). Until the Hostalings was made available, no one knew what low-proof rye whisky long aged in non-charred wood would taste like. (Lot 40 is a partial exception, and indeed it bears some resemblances to Hostalings but does not really taste juniper-like). Now we know and it may shed light on the early development of genever gin. Sorry to interpolate this note about whiskey in a beer thread but Anchor is the link!

Gary

MTBottle
08-18-2006, 18:22
Today, I went to the liquor store and come home with a few microbrews. I bought an Anchor Porter, Dogfish Head Brewery 60-minute IPA, Dogfish 120-minute IPA, and a Stone Ruination IPA. As you can probably tell I am a huge fan of IPA's. What beers are you all drinking, out there these days? I love beer and I love whiskey, but I'm curous about the beers you are enjoying. Maybe I can get some good tips.

Those are some of my favorites, especially the 120. My current inventory of beers (and I'd recommend any one of them) are:

Victory Prima Pils, and Old Horizontal
Weyerbacher Heresy, and Double Simcoe IPA
Dogfish Immort Ale, and 90 Minute IPA
Sierra Nevada Bigfoot 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, and 2006
Thomas Hardy 2004
Dominion Oak Barrel Stout, and Ale
Great Lakes Locktender Lager
Brooklyn Brewery Brown Ale

Mark

nor02lei
08-20-2006, 06:07
Those are some of my favorites, especially the 120. My current inventory of beers (and I'd recommend any one of them) are:

Victory Prima Pils, and Old Horizontal
Weyerbacher Heresy, and Double Simcoe IPA
Dogfish Immort Ale, and 90 Minute IPA
Sierra Nevada Bigfoot 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, and 2006
Thomas Hardy 2004
Dominion Oak Barrel Stout, and Ale
Great Lakes Locktender Lager
Brooklyn Brewery Brown Ale

Mark

Mark,

The 2006 Bigfoot did hit Sweden 2 weeks ago. 720 bottles all together and only sold in our 3 biggest cities for about 5 USD a peas. Its not an easy task to be an American beer freak in Sweden.

Leif

MTBottle
08-22-2006, 04:18
Mark,

The 2006 Bigfoot did hit Sweden 2 weeks ago. 720 bottles all together and only sold in our 3 biggest cities for about 5 USD a peas. Its not an easy task to be an American beer freak in Sweden.

Leif

Leif, If you like Bigfoot and haven't tried the 2006 yet, try to buy some, I think it's the best one I've tasted since the first one I tried in 1999. That price isn't too bad...the couple of times I was fortunate enough to find it on tap here in Pennsylvania, I paid about $5 a glass. But the few cases I've have cellared were a much better price...about $40 per case of 24 bottles.

Mark

chasking
08-22-2006, 15:10
My homebrewing club recently brewed up a bourbon porter. We used a porter kit from Northern Brewer and added about 500 ml of Maker's Mark to the fermenter. Damn, it's good! Except that it could have used a little more bourbon! When we cracked open the first bottles, I splashed in a little more Maker's and the result was really quite tasty. The beer and whiskey flavors melded well and complemented each other.

We quickly resolved to brew another batch---I'm hoping to try a rye-based bourbon this time. Although the Maker's Mark was certainly good, I think this is a use in which a lower-tier bourbon would be just fine---the harshness generally associated with such spirits would be dissipated in the beer, but the bourbon character would still come through. The subtleties of a higher-end bourbon would also, I would think, get lost mixed with a robust beer like a porter. So, I'm going to lobby for Ten High.

Anybody else made bourbon-spiked beer? What bourbon(s) did you use?

barturtle
08-22-2006, 15:45
Interesting thought, though I don't brew. I would have never thought of adding the bourbon at the start of the ferment. The higher initial alcohol content seems like it would lead to a sweeter brew as the yeast would die off before the sugars had all been reduced to the normal level.

Thinking back to the orange-bourbon thread, how would this work in a belgian style wheat beer?

Sijan
08-25-2006, 00:00
Drank a fair amount of Shiner Bock when I was on my Texas tour. Was pretty good for what it is - basically available like a macro brew in most places in TX.

Drank a lot of Fat Tire on my trip, and was also very pleasantly surprised by New Belgium's 1554 Black Ale. Very good stuff - definitely a favorite of mine.

I also tried Yeti Imperial Stout and despite the online raves was not to thrilled by it - way too hoppy for a stout IMO. The flavors just didn't mesh well at all.

Had a few Lambic beers with my girlfriend at the Alamo Draft House - that's about the only beer she'll drink. They were the standard brand - Framboise, or whatever it is. Peach & Raspberry. Liked them both, the nose of the raspberry was great, but I think I could drink more of the peach.

nor02lei
08-25-2006, 07:24
Leif, If you like Bigfoot and haven't tried the 2006 yet, try to buy some, I think it's the best one I've tasted since the first one I tried in 1999. That price isn't too bad...the couple of times I was fortunate enough to find it on tap here in Pennsylvania, I paid about $5 a glass. But the few cases I've have cellared were a much better price...about $40 per case of 24 bottles.

Mark

Mark,

Believe it or not I have had Bigfoot on tap in Sweden as well. Not in any bar though but at Stockholm whisky and beer festival. 40 buck for 24 bottles seems like real nice price for a beer of that calibre.

Leif

Powertrip
09-04-2006, 09:55
Out here in San Francisco I drink a lot of Anchor Steam. All their beers are great...Anchor Steam, Liberty Ale, Anchor Small Beer, Anchor Bock. I also drink cheap Mexican beer in cans, like Tecate or Modelo...great for a hot day.

Anchor Steam. Always been one of my favorites! Thank goodness they import it to Canada!

Powertrip
09-04-2006, 10:08
Oh oh...people I just tried a real gooder. Lip smacking good.
Young's Luxury Double Chocolate Stout.
It is so delicate and suttle yet covers the palate in flavor. Get out there and try it...yikes its good!

Barrel_Proof
09-04-2006, 17:32
Enjoying a 90 Minute Imperial IPA tonight, in honor of Bobby's birthday.

CrispyCritter
09-05-2006, 20:06
Young's Luxury Double Chocolate Stout.
That sounds downright scary, especially for a chocoholic like me. ;)

Note that, as far as stout goes, I prefer Murphy's to Guiness.

Joeluka
09-06-2006, 06:33
That sounds downright scary, especially for a chocoholic like me. ;)

Note that, as far as stout goes, I prefer Murphy's to Guiness.

Those are good stouts but you should try Victory's Storm King Stout, North Coast's Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, and any of Rouge's Stouts. They will jsut warm you right up.

Big Chipper
09-06-2006, 11:43
Anchor Old Foghorn barleywine ale...good, good stuff!

cowdery
09-06-2006, 11:56
If one must drink a pilsner, there is only one (at least, only one that is readily available at Jewel): Pilsner Urquell.

Gillman
09-06-2006, 13:10
I recommend the canned version which arrives very fresh in North America. The best-by date (on underside of can) by my interpretation is 9 months after production. We get them here as early as two months after production. That is pretty fresh. The product takes to the canning very well. When fresh it never has a hint of any faults. Although I know people who swear by the bottled one I am always slightly mistrustful of the green bottle. In my experience they are susceptible to being light-struck (a fault in which light causes a photosynthetical reaction in the hops and an off-flavor occurs). Fresh Urquel in the bottle won't generally have the fault but I prefer the canned one. Urquel is available on draft too but I'd rather have a fresh can (less chance of a mishandled keg or poor draught service). Very fine beer which has a micro brewery-like taste, the spiciness of Saaz hops and the sweetness of Czech malting barley are in perfect union.

Gary

ratcheer
09-06-2006, 15:13
If one must drink a pilsner, there is only one (at least, only one that is readily available at Jewel): Pilsner Urquell.

That used to be one of my favorites, too. It is so expensive here, now, that I can no longer bear to buy it.

Supposedly, it has been brewed using the same continuous yeast culture for over 1300 years, which has been carefully protected through many major wars and other upheavals.

Tim

Powertrip
09-06-2006, 16:23
That sounds downright scary, especially for a chocoholic like me. ;)


Tell me about it. I'm not a big fan of sugary beers but this was delicious cocca and that's it, the sugar was nominal.

Powertrip
09-06-2006, 16:25
Anchor Old Foghorn barleywine ale...good, good stuff!

I'm starting to really enjoy barleywine beers. A local one made by Alley Cat here in Canada is quite good as well....want to try and taste as many as I can!

Gillman
09-06-2006, 16:30
Brewing does go back millenia in the Bohemian and other German-influenced Central and Eastern lands (of course in England too, etc.).

However the creation of Czech pilsener beer can be dated quite precisely to the 1840's - pils beer is a newb in the beer world, that is.

Bohemians wanted to improve their beer and the malting barley which was at its core. A German brewer was brought to Pilsen to help brew an improved beer. He came up uniquely with a light-kilned malt and the light-coloured Czech pils was born. Before that the beers were dark in color, as they were in Munich until the 1920's when the rage for Pilsener and its derivatives (which went around the world not least in the U.S.) impelled the Bavarians to develop a Helles (light-coloured) beer.

That is as far as the color goes. Lager beer is (dark or light) bottom-fermented and that style of beer was known for hundreds of years before Pilsener was invented (i.e., Urquel is a light-colored offshoot of dark, bottom-fermented lager). Its use was facilitated by storing the beer in cold caves in Germany and by brewing in the colder parts of the year.

With the onset of mechanical refrigeration in the later 1800's, this gave lager beer a huge push. It enabled its methodical, reliable production. Well, Pasteur helped too, also later in the 1800's.

The styles of Czech beer that existed before Pilsener were probably dark lagers (they still survive there, after a fashion) and top-fermented wheat beers, which may also survive here and there in the East but did better in Germany and Belgium and have resurged in recent decades. Probably too the old ambient-brewed and stored top-fermented ales were common in parts of the German east. Those ales had the fruity tang of a top-ferment beer, and they still do. Victorian England stuck with the old ales but the Germans (mostly, not entirely) ditched them for the new improved lager beer of which the star was pioneered in Germanic-influenced Bohemia.

It's as if someone decided today to invent a new and improved bourbon and it took off like a rocket - that is what Urquel beer was like in the 1840's..

Gary

barturtle
09-06-2006, 17:14
This time period (1840s) also happens to correlate quite nicely with the advent of pressed glass(1827). It would take a few years for the process to become widespread. The old dark and sometimes murky looking ales, while tasting fine, were always hidden in a stein.

The spead of cheap glass mugs and glasses suddenly showed how ugly these beers were. The new pilsner absolutely sparkled in the glass.

barturtle
12-16-2006, 14:05
Right now as I type this,I am sitting in Rogue's southern-most public house, in San Francisco, enjoying a Santa's on draft.

SBOmarc
12-16-2006, 15:22
Fat Tire, Heineken Light, New Castle and Stella Artois.

T47
12-16-2006, 15:30
Elysian Brewery ESB, called The Wise. This is the best bottled beer I have had. I also had their ISP The Immortal, which I enjoyed but did not find it as remarkable.
This (http://www.elysianbrewing.com/index.html) is their web site.

melting
12-16-2006, 16:03
Samuel Adams winter lager, what else really living here near Boston Massachusets. Mixed in is some Wachusett Country Ale done up by a brewer one town over from me. It's a little expensive at $24.99 a case but it supports the local guys.

Chris

ratcheer
12-16-2006, 17:38
Tonight, I had a Pete's Wicked Ale. Very tasty!

Tim

Joeluka
12-17-2006, 08:35
Brooklyn's Monster Ale and Goose Island's Bourbon County Stout. I also spent some time with Stone's Double Bastard Ale and their "Oaked" Arrogant Bastard (they put the OAB in sixers this year:bigeyes: )

cowdery
12-18-2006, 23:25
Stella (a new favorite) and Pilsner Urquell (an old one). Despite the admitted appeal of ales, I seem to have a soft spot for well-hopped pilsners.

jeff
12-19-2006, 03:52
Leslie and I were in Chicago this past weekend and had a few beers at Rock Bottom and Goose Island. Both were nice with good food, but Rock Bottom has the better beer. Their winter beer is dark and very hoppy (and very good) and the oatmeal stout is exceptional. They have several bourbon-aged beers, a stout, a brown, a porter and a coffee porter. I tasted the porter and, while good, I think they over did it just a touch with the bourbon barrel. Highly recommeneded.

Whiskey Willie
12-19-2006, 05:45
With winter coming on, the stock on Bell's Kalamazoo Stout is in, as well as the ole stand-by Samuel Adams Boston Ale.

nor02lei
12-19-2006, 06:48
I drink Oppigårdens winter ale. It is from a microbrewery 40 km from my home. They only brew this beer for Christmas. It is a small business and the owner still work part time at his regular work.

Leif

OscarV
12-19-2006, 13:19
Grolsch
It was such an expceptional day today, weather wise that is, lots of sun and above normal temps, so I felt like a beer.
I picked up a 6 pack of Grolsch. I like to pour it in a glass and smell.
It is filling, but I have room today.

ratcheer
12-19-2006, 14:48
Grolsch
It was such an expceptional day today, weather wise that is, lots of sun and above normal temps, so I felt like a beer.
I picked up a 6 pack of Grolsch. I like to pour it in a glass and smell.
It is filling, but I have room today.

I used to buy Grolsch, back in the day. Does it still have that complex stopper with wire thing? I haven't had it in a long time, but I remember always enjoying it.

Tim

SBOmarc
12-19-2006, 20:25
"Oil Can" Foster's...and some brats with cabbage.

cowdery
12-19-2006, 20:47
I like Grolsch too, probably my favorite Dutch beer and what I generally will drink when there (what I smoke is another matter). It wasn't that long ago that the "complex stopper with wire" thing was the only way Grolsch came, but now I more generally see it with normal caps. However, Binny's and a few other places have the biggies (what are they, 1 L, I guess?) and they still have the thingie.

smokinjoe
12-21-2006, 14:50
Loaded up today for the Holidays today with: Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout, Celabrator Doppelbock, Sweetwater 420 Ale, and Good ol Budweiser. The first three are awesome brews that I've been drinking regularly for the last month or so. I'm a regular Bud drinker, but I become even more attached to them during the Holidays, because I can't resist the special Holiday packaging on the carton. A harbinger of the Season for me, is the several years old Clydesdales tromping through the snow TV commercial. Which reminds me, I don't recall seeing the equally as old, good and similar Miller Holiday commercial. Is it still shown?
Cheers!
JOE

gothbat
12-21-2006, 18:31
I like Grolsch too, probably my favorite Dutch beer

Same here, it's a little more bitter than Heineken. The wire stopper bottles are nice, I never want to throw them out after I drink them since they cost so much and look cool but I have no use for them. Although it's widely available here I never even noticed this beer until I was in Holland and didn't try it once, when I got back I ran out and bought some. I'm not sure if there are bigger ones but the ones I get are 16oz and can be bought either single or in four packs.

Anyway, I haven't drank any of them yet but I just picked up some Fantome de Noel. I love this beer, as well as all the others I've tried in the Fantome (Belgian Saison ale btw) line, and I think it's definitely in the running for not only my favorite Fantome but my favorite beer over all. I was pretty disapointed that the liquor store didn't get any in last xmas and the guy hadn't stocked the shelves yet so I just grabbed the whole case. :grin: So yeah, that's the beer I'll be drinking in days to come! :) Let's just hope it's as good as I remember, it's been a while...

full_proof
04-28-2007, 08:19
I think the intensity of bourbon collecting and tasting has changed my palate so much that I can hardly swallow the ubiquitous foamy, light, piss-yellow domestic "girly" beers. I usually drink Samuel Adams Black Lager, Samuel Adams Boston Lager, Sierra Nevada Porter, Guiness Extra Stout, Negra Modelo and Flying Dog Scottish Porter. :drink:

nor02lei
04-28-2007, 10:51
Loaded up today for the Holidays today with: Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout, JOE

We did have the 2005 version (vintage) of this here at our government store some 15-month ago and it was very good. It did come a small load of the last version as well but it was banned of some reason and the importer was not able to sell it. I am not sure but I think it was because the alcohol content wasn’t on the label.
My regular “house beer” just now is Anchor liberty ale.

Leif

Jazzhead
04-29-2007, 16:17
Funny, I love to try all manner of bourbon, but for beer I tend to stick to the same brand - Straub's, from St Mary's, Pennsylvania. This is a historic pre-Prohibition brewery that makes the cleanest, most refreshing lager I know. Eminently drinkable, the way Rolling Rock used to be.

I also like Yuengling Premium (not the Traditional Lager, which is darker. Premium is the golden lager they've been selling in Pottsville for over a century. Trad Lager was ( and is) a successful attempt to grow the Yuengling brand outside Pennsy, and is always my go-to beer in a bar that has nothing better. But the Premium is what all the old pensioned anthracite minors have always drunk, short beers for two bits apiece. )

I picked up a case of Stoney's last week, but it's not from Smithton anymore, it's made by Iron City. Hey it's great that Iron City is still around! Zesty, I suppose, but really a very slight beer. On hot days, it'll wet my whistle.

bigtoys
05-28-2007, 21:25
Pete's Wicked Ale
Hacker Pschorr Weisse
Unibroue--a Belgian style ale from Canada.

SBOmarc
05-30-2007, 16:02
Dos Equis Amber, Tecate and Negra Modello. Getting ready for a late June Cabo trip.

TBoner
05-30-2007, 18:10
Dos Equis Amber, Tecate and Negra Modello. Getting ready for a late June Cabo trip.

Don't pass up Bohemia if it's available to you. Until very recently, when some American microbrewers began trying to resurrect the style, Bohemia was as close as you could get to a pre-Prohibition American-style lager. Well-hopped, but not aggressive, with a good bit of corn in the grain bill and a rich, malty finish that doesn't keep it from being very refreshing. Along w/PBR, this is a "swill" beer I like to keep on hand. Actually, given its import status, it costs a good bit more than even Bud. But it's worth it.

BTW, I've been drinking a good bit of homebrewed saison and Bridgeport IPA.

jeff
05-30-2007, 19:03
Tonight, while brewing my oatmeal stout, I enjoyed a Deschutes' Mirror Pond pale ale and a Black Butte porter :yum: Can't get these east of Colorado, so a friend and I have them shipped in across country on a freight truck. With shipping it becomes something like $3/beer. Outrageous, but worth every penny!

Hyperspace
05-30-2007, 22:41
Trappist Westvleteren 12
Miller High Life


:bigeyes: I know, that’s crazy! :lol:

RoyalWater
06-01-2007, 21:33
The commercials finally got me and I tried Budweiser Select a few days ago. I was pleasantly surprised at the richness of the flavor. No, it's not Arrogant Bastard Ale or Skullsplitter, but it's a bit surprising for American macro-brew. Not even as heavy as Molson Canadian, but surprisingly flavorful. I was under the impression from advertising that it was a second light beer in the Budweiser franchise. I suggest it get a fair trial from those who like American beers. I consider it very good, but it's not going to displace my PBR. I might buy it from time to time, especially if I'm going to be in the company of AB lovers.

Martian
06-03-2007, 03:46
I'm with you Kevin. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is hard to beat. I also think Warsteiner blond is a good mass produced German.

nor02lei
06-03-2007, 10:11
The latest versions of Brooklyn black chocolate stout and Bigfoot. They did release some small quantities of these 2 beers in our government store June 1. They didn’t get one single bottle in my small town so I had to go to the next city and be at the door when it opened10 am.
I was well worth the trouble!

Leif

mier
06-04-2007, 01:40
Because it`s already quite warm over here i drink a lot of Lambic Gueuze as well as Kriek, fresh and crispy Belgian beer but on colder days i prefer Guinness or Hertog Jan triple.Just depends on the climate.Eric.

Whiskey Willie
06-04-2007, 13:16
Warm weather = Bell's Pale Ale

jeff
06-04-2007, 14:56
Warm weather = Bell's Pale Ale

Have you tried their Two-Hearted Ale? One of the best IPA's available IMHO. :yum:

ratcheer
06-04-2007, 15:02
Warm weather ==> Budweiser in that red aluminum bottle thing

Tim

Joeluka
06-04-2007, 16:40
Have you tried their Two-Hearted Ale? One of the best IPA's available IMHO. :yum:

Jeff hit that one right one the Head. It cost me a bit more but in NY I have to ship it in. Great Beer. Smuttynose also makes a great IPA.


I forgot to mention Bell's Hop Slam. It's an Imperial IPA and it's one of my all time favorite Beers in general. If you enjoy super-hopped beers, GO GET IT!!!!

barturtle
06-04-2007, 16:44
Gee warm weather = Guinness in the can for me as opposed to the much richer bottled Extra Stout version for me. And of course hefewiezen instead of dunkel, the occasional Pilsner Urkel or Warsteiner...I guess I just turn everything down a notch.

Whiskey Willie
06-05-2007, 05:35
Have you tried their Two-Hearted Ale? One of the best IPA's available IMHO. :yum:

Nope, but I will look for it on the next beer run. Bell's Kalamazoo stout is pretty good too.

jeff
06-05-2007, 07:34
I forgot to mention Bell's Hop Slam. It's an Imperial IPA and it's one of my all time favorite Beers in general. If you enjoy super-hopped beers, GO GET IT!!!!

Yep, that's a good one. But watch out, it's 10% abv and goes down easily. :drinking:


Nope, but I will look for it on the next beer run. Bell's Kalamazoo stout is pretty good too.

Look for the one with the fish on the label. :fish2:

Special Reserve
06-10-2007, 08:58
Warm Weather = Bell's Oberon. A great summer beer. Unfortunately my wife has discovered it as well. She will always tell me how good the bourbon is that I serve her but fortunately does not pour herself a bourbon.

OscarV
06-10-2007, 09:07
This is the best time of year for Oberon, they roll it out in April so it's only a couple months old.
But as with wheat beer even at that age, you can taste a differece in the beer at just a month or two, more citrus in the aroma.

mier
06-11-2007, 06:56
OscarV,which Oberon are you talking about?Alocal brew or a Belgian one?Eric.

barturtle
06-11-2007, 08:18
I just noticed that Rodenbach has finally returned to Louisville, as well as Gouden Carolous and a couple others.

I did notice the Oberon, also available on draft in growlers, and in 5L mini-kegs...maybe next time...I had to get some Flanders Red!

Joeluka
06-11-2007, 09:50
I just noticed that Rodenbach has finally returned to Louisville, as well as Gouden Carolous and a couple others.

I did notice the Oberon, also available on draft in growlers, and in 5L mini-kegs...maybe next time...I had to get some Flanders Red!


Did they have the Grand Cru or Classic on tap??? I don't know what kind of imports you get in KY, but if you like the Rodenbach's I suggest Panil Barrique, Duchesse De Bourgogne, and La Folie (New Belgium). I find that I love the Flanders Oud Bruins as much as the Flanders Red ales. Go for Liefmans Goudenband and Petrus Brown. The fact that most of these are barrel aged, giving the ales an oaky wooden flavor really does it for me. I have a bunch of these cellaring right now.

I just went a took a Grand Cru and Goudenband out of the beer bunker and put it in the fridge for tonight. I've been doing vertical of Barleywines and Imperial IPA's lately and this will be well deserved change of pace. Thanks Tim!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

snakster
06-11-2007, 12:14
Currently I'm drinking my staple, Stegmaier 1857. Brewed at The Lion Brewery in beautiful and historic Wilkes-Barre, PA.

barturtle
06-11-2007, 13:19
Did they have the Grand Cru or Classic on tap??? I don't know what kind of imports you get in KY, but if you like the Rodenbach's I suggest Panil Barrique, Duchesse De Bourgogne, and La Folie (New Belgium). I find that I love the Flanders Oud Bruins as much as the Flanders Red ales. Go for Liefmans Goudenband and Petrus Brown. The fact that most of these are barrel aged, giving the ales an oaky wooden flavor really does it for me. I have a bunch of these cellaring right now.

I just went a took a Grand Cru and Goudenband out of the beer bunker and put it in the fridge for tonight. I've been doing vertical of Barleywines and Imperial IPA's lately and this will be well deserved change of pace. Thanks Tim!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

No, bottles only, but your choice of 750ml or 8.45 oz (glad I just realized they were that small or I wouldn't have picked them up for they price they were charging...ouch!)

Duchesse De Bourgogne I have had, as well as Goudenband and Petrus. I consider Goudenband my "camping beer". Panil Barrique, though, I have not heard of, and alas New Belgium doesn't make it here (nor in Louisiana, either...but I can go over to Texas and pick some up from time to time.)

About cellaring these...how long do you expect to cellar this type of beer, I have never thought of cellaring them before, though I do have some others hidden away in a cool dark closet.

While we're on the subject...do you think '97 JW Lees is ready to drink at this point or past its prime?

pepcycle
06-11-2007, 18:19
Last night I dranks some Andelot ABT Mystique.
Malty and velvety smooth with notes of raisin.
Lots of alcohol this quadrupel comes in pretty high in the ABV category.
A pleasant surprise.

Pastor Bourbon
06-11-2007, 18:40
The prospect of store-bought is not a thrill. It's legal to brew here in Australia, and fully 95% of my beer would be homebrew!

I agree with OscarV - that (brewing) and drinking beers, ale, lagers, and stouts is a seasonal event. The hotter the weather, the lighter and colder the beer.

Here in Queensland, Australia the 'winter' weather has set in and it's nut brown ale, Brown smoked ale and Bock beer with additional malt for me. The enjoyment of stout is yet to come with the heavy winter weather still ahead.

Having said all this I had some of the Yuengling Traditional Lager when we visited family in Lexington, Virginia and that was not a bad drop.

Grolsch, Kirin, Elephant Beer, Asahi and Guinness are hard to pass as regular store-boughts and maybe it's the ex-patriot in me but I buy a six-pack of Bud in the summer when the weather is really sticky and get it to just below icing up in the bottle temperature...

and there you have it :)

Joeluka
06-11-2007, 19:27
Hey Pastor, Coopers Vintage Ale is one of my all-tme favorties

gothbat
06-12-2007, 17:32
The beer I most recently tried was called Famosa. it was a pretty good lager for summer, tasted great, cooled me down, and went great with the clams! I just bought it on a whim because the bottle said it was Guatemalan. I'll definitely be buying more of this but probably not until after I work through all the beer I accumulated earlier this year.

brian12069
06-12-2007, 18:13
These days...Saranac Black Forest...

mred
06-12-2007, 18:31
Miller Lite

OscarV
06-12-2007, 19:15
Molson Golden

smokinjoe
06-13-2007, 09:56
Still working off some beer from our Cinco de Mayo party last month: Dos Equis, Tecate, Corona, Sol, and Modelo. :bandit:

Cheers!

JOSE

snakster
06-14-2007, 10:33
These days...Saranac Black Forest...
Me likey.

To me, the only good thing about winter time is getting the Saranac '12 beers of winter' case.

Joeluka
06-14-2007, 13:20
I went with two complete opposite ends of the beer spectrum. Started with a 750ml of Cantillon Rose De Gambrinus. This is one of my all-time favorite fruit lambics out there. I then decided to open up a DFH Burton Baton I've been cellaring for a year. This is a great American double I.P.A. Its a blend of an oak-aged English Strong ale (Immort Ale) and a double I.P.A. (90-minute I.P.A.) I recommend both if you can them.

ratcheer
06-16-2007, 11:14
I went way off my usual scale, yesterday. I went to a beer store that claims to sell every beer legally available in Alabama. Many desirable beers do not qualify because of above-the-limit alcohol content.

I decided that while I was there, I would choose something more upscale in honor of Father's Day. So after browsing the choices for 20 minutes or so, I settled on a 4-pack of Samuel Smith's Organically Made Ale. What could it cost? $8? $9? It rang up as $11.58 including tax!

So I had one last night. It is very good, but I'm not sure its that good. :skep:

Tim

Pastor Bourbon
06-18-2007, 03:47
Yes Joeluka, Coopers do a fine job all round! If you're a stout drinker too, you might like to see if you can find a Eumundi Stout, bottled here in Queensland, Australia. fairly 'fruity' and straight shooting withvery little bitterness.

The other one I enjoyed when we were in the States in January was the Negra Modelo which I sampled while sitting in LAX for 12 and a half hours :) Couldn't remember what it was called til I read through these postings; but if I ever see it in Oz I'll definitely get a six-pack.

OscarV
07-05-2007, 13:54
Stella Artois from Belgium.
I have noticed the last half year that this beer has been grabbing a lot of tap handles in bars and resturants.
So I tried it on tap and I see why. It tastes like beer.
Not light beer, ultra light beer, dry beer, ice beer, amber beer, honey beer, raspberry beer, ect. beer, ect. beer.
Yeah, it tastes like beer and beer tastes good.

I also got a 6pac bots. Much prefer it on tap at a bar, but I will repeat that 6 of bots.

TBoner
07-05-2007, 18:20
Stella Artois from Belgium.
I also got a 6pac bots. Much prefer it on tap at a bar, but I will repeat that 6 of bots.

My recommendation is to buy a 12-pack next time. Because of the green bottles (which don't block UV rays), the hops in Stella can get skunked by UV light in beer display cases, etc. This may be one reason you prefer it on tap. The bottles in the 12er are sealed off from light. Not saying the sixer you have is skunked, but it's worth a shot. I always buy 12ers of clear or green bottles if I can. YMMV.

TNbourbon
07-05-2007, 18:22
Sam Adams Winter Lager, with chicken/pasta at Ruby Tuesday's in South Carolina.
Good choice -- I'll look for it when I get home.

OscarV
07-06-2007, 12:40
Yeah TBoner,
I will try a covered 12 pack the next time, I do know light does hurt beer, also heat and time. But there is a difference between draft and bottled beer.
A few years ago I heard that a beer advocacy group was going to petition breweries to stop using clear and green glass bottles and to go with brown only.

jesskidden
07-07-2007, 09:12
My recommendation is to buy a 12-pack next time. Because of the green bottles (which don't block UV rays), the hops in Stella can get skunked by UV light in beer display cases, etc.

I can't find any confirmation of it on the 'net, but on one of those cable TV channel (History, Food, Discovery?) shows on beer and the brewing industry, there was a segment filmed at the Stella Artois facility (right around the time InBev first re-introduced it to the US market as "luck" would have it) and a brewery spokesman said that Stella's green bottles had a "special coating" that filtered out the harmful light waves. I sort of raised my eyebrow at that (gee, wouldn't it just be easier to put it in brown bottles, "tradition in the US" be damned?) and since it's not the sort of beer I'd ever seek out I've never "tested" the special bottle and now I'm surprised to see no mention of it with various Google searches. Anyone remember that show?

Gillman
07-07-2007, 10:27
An interesting and controversial question. I prefer beer in brown bottles or preferably, if newly packaged, in cans. Fresh Stella Artois in cans is an excellent mass market lager. It is good on draft too. We get it fresh in Canada due to the Labatt distribution that opened when InBev (Stella's parent in Belgium) bought Labatt's, and due also to the sales volume: Stella is selling very well here.

However, I drank Stella in Belgium in the early 90's and thought it was better than what we get now, not because of freshness, but it seemed more flowery in taste. I suspect the beer was tweaked somewhat in connection with the international launches that occurred after but make no mistake, it is an excellent beer, all-malt as far as I know, anyway I like it.

Probably the green bottles are as good since they are sold fast also but I just have an ingrained tendency to prefer brown glass and canned products (all cans are lined now to prevent the tinniness that used to occur). Heineken's green bottles seem, today, largely exempt from the skunking problem, I am sure it too uses some type of coating or other system to retard the reaction that can occur when light and hops interract.

It's funny though, I think some of this has to do with the brewer's skill and/or nature of the beer, e.g., there is a Saison I like, I think Pipaix', that I used to buy at Beers of the World in Rochester, NY when I got down there more than I do now. It was sold for many years in clear bottles, and maybe still is. The beer was always perfect! I had drunk it in Belgium and it always tasted great here too, no matter how old. Some beers are just made right and (within reason) nothing can hurt them.

Samuel Smith's beers (well-regarded ales from Yorkshire, England) were sold for many years in clear bottles and they always seemed fine to me. I have noticed recent imports of Sam Smith beers are sold in brown glass and I am all for that, but the clear bottles seemed okay in their case.

However I can't count the skunky pils-type beers I've had in green bottles in my time and so in general, I stay away from any beer sold in green glass unless I buy them right out of a freshly opened case. I did this recently with a 6 pack of Peroni and it was fine, assisted also by the freshness of the beer. While we don't have the largest selection of imported beer in Ontario, generally the imports are being brought in really fast these days and their quality is much improved as a result.

Gary

Pastor Bourbon
07-12-2007, 06:57
"An interesting and controversial question. I prefer beer in brown bottles..." Gillman

For home brewing purposes I wouldn't use anything but brown bottles; because of the 'light' factor.

Anecdotally speaking, a friend brewed several darker ales, using whatever bottles he had at the time - clear Corona bottles, greens and browns. He didn't like them brews and had promised to give me several dozen old bottles he was no longer using.

Along with the empties came the beers he didn't enjoy. They had been sitting in a shed, partially exposed to light for two years. Same bottling, mixed together in the cases, some of each colour exposed to direct sunlight some not. All of the clear bottles without fail were rubbish! not many greens so hard to tell; but... even the brown bottles exposed to light were still drinkable; and those which were out of the light made me very pleased indeed that my mate didn't like dark ales.

To answer the question: at the moment I am drinking young kit homebrewings of Brown Smoked Ale and Nut Brown Ale. Soon I will be getting into the last of my Cooper's Stout homebrewing which is 1 year old and lovely! Cheers.

Gillman
07-12-2007, 09:00
All good and interesting points. I don't doubt that over a long time period such as you describe, brown glass containers are superior to clear or green although as you point out, even brown glass ultimately allows some light in (i.e., you said the ones kept completely dark were best).

What does this mean? Beer should be consumed as quickly as possible, but where it is intended for aging, keep it out of any light whatever.

This mean too that some green glass beer will drink well if sold quickly. The turnover of high-volume brands like Heineken and Beck's (plus Grolsch and many others) is such that the light just doesn't have time to work any harm to the beer. Also, I believe some companies do use a protective coating as was mentioned earlier.

Still, all in all, I'll take a canned product over the bottled equivalent. Comparative tastings e.g. of Pilsener Urquel in its green bottle and the can show to me the superiority of the canned one although when very fresh the differences are not great.

Gary

Pastor Bourbon
07-12-2007, 19:37
Sure, no problem.

When it comes to home-brewed beer, part of the added pleasure is that if treated like wine in the storage process, homebrew develops character with age.

I drank a ten year old stout and a six year old brown ale that had been well cellered and they were better and more interesting than ANY store-bought beer I've ever tasted with one or two exceptions that were equally as good.

This is not to say that any homebrew will be better than any store-bought of course. :D

Gillman
07-13-2007, 05:22
Definitely agreed some beers benefit from long aging, this will occur with bott-conditioned beers. It is such an exception (i.e., known only to some homebrewers and micros) that I didn't mention it, but I've had some great unfiltered long-agers (I did mention e.g., earlier Saison Pipaix).

Gary

melting
07-13-2007, 13:38
Wachusett Country Ale. In a nice brown bottle. In my opinion, beer should be packaged in bottles, not cans. I believe Jim Koch just ruffled some feathers when he made that statement.

Chris

mier
07-14-2007, 13:59
In his biography Freddie Heineken admitting to put Heineken in green bottles for export for esthetic reasons,being different and there for more attractive to buy.In Heinekens homeland all breweries use brown bottles,it would block the sun the best.The green bottles are looked upon as a minor bottle to be drunk right away.If it is true i don`t know fact is that brown blocks sunlight better than other colours.Winebottles are green but these are being put in a dark place so sun doesn`t affect the bottles.If beer would be stored this way i expect it wouldn`t give problems too.
Eric.

TBoner
07-14-2007, 14:09
Bridgeport ESB. Delicious, balanced ale with a long, complex finish.
Homebrewed saison from last winter. This is good, but its aromatics aren't as potent as when first brewed. Of course this style is meant to be aged, so it could be consumed at the end of a long storage, so perhaps this is a historically accurate flavor. Nonetheless, I enjoyed the funk of the fresh-bottled stuff.
Tomorrow I'll be opening a 2004 Anchor Old Foghorn barleywine. Very excited about it...

Phischy
07-17-2007, 14:20
On tap I have a Rust Ale-was intended to be a red ale made w/ chocolate malt and a touch of roasted malt, but it came out a wee bit too dark and heavy.

Other tap is about to be carb'd up and I have my choice for a Pale Ale, a Nut Brown or a Mocha Vanilla Chocolate Porter and I've got a San Diego Pale Ale (IIPA-push to rename all Double or Imperial IPA's to San Diego Pale Ale since that style was started in So Cal) in the 2ndary. I bottled an Extra Pale ALe for the co-workers to be delievered Monday (which means they'll all be hungover Tuesday). That leaves me with 2 empty 5gal kegs, and Sept 1st I'll recieve 4 3gal kegs so I can put a 3rd tap on my kegerator. Time to start brewing!

On my docket is a cider, a spiced amber ale, and thinking ahead for winter I'll need to brew up a nice stout.

Commercial brews: None.

Favorite local brewpub is Port Brewing Company. Couldn't care less about Stone, but they have an awesome new faciilty. San Diego County has amazing breweries and I was just thinking I need to set up another brew tour.

Favorite IPA is Pliney the Younger from Russian River. If you EVER get a chance to taste, it'll blow you away. Do not confuse with Pliney the Elder, which is more easliy found.

Frodo
07-27-2007, 02:52
From the LCBO

- Innis & Gunn beer aged in Scotch casks. I'd prefer to try beer aged in Bourbon casks, but you get what you can.
- Corona because of the weather.

From the Pub anything from the Granite Brewery (local brewpub).

CrownVicLX
07-29-2007, 12:44
Flying Dog Pale Ale, they also make a good porter.

I'm partial to Newcastle, too.

barturtle
07-29-2007, 13:32
New Albanian Brewing Co. Old 15-B. (http://www.newalbanian.com/bobs%20old%2015b.html)

Brought home in a growler, wonderful stuff
(http://www.newalbanian.com/bobs%20old%2015b.html)

nor02lei
07-29-2007, 14:45
I did go to the fantastic beer bar in Söderbärke yesterday. I did drink almost exclusively American beer. Most of them very good but the 2 best came from the same brewery: Oskar Blouse Brewery. Jackmans American pale ale and the totally fantastic Gordon IPA. The later was one of the best beers I ever had in my life. The taste was still in my mouth several minutes after I did finish it.

Leif

bigtoys
08-03-2007, 19:49
Had a Hacker-Pschorr Weisse w/ pizza for dinner. Tasty!

nor02lei
08-04-2007, 14:18
I did visit Gothenburg’s and maybe Sweden’s best beer bar The Rover for the second time this year just before the Rolling Stones concert that was my prime goal. I do really love some of the micro beer from a very small local brewery called Dugges that they carry. They got a double IPA called bullocks with is a very god IPA for Swedish standards. I don’t understand the “double” though. Their real highlight is there porter “half idiot” though. Very very thick and individual stile with a lot of liquorice in the taste that I’m not used to find in porters. Double would have been very motivated here instead of bullocks. By the way. The owner and one man operator of the brewery also do deliver the beer by his private car to the few bars in the city that carries it.

Leif

HipFlask
08-05-2007, 20:44
I had a couple of Bitburger's and a veltin's while I watched the Bourne Identiy. Hoplefully tomorrow I will watch the Bourne Supermacy and crack open some Schwartz Beer and maybe some ER 10 yr.

TBoner
08-12-2007, 12:02
It's Sunday afternoon. Pizza and beer.

Today, it's a bomber of Bear Republic's Hop Rod Rye. Never had this, as it's realtively new to our market.

Appearance: Deep red, bordering on brown but shot through with nice ruby highlights. Creamy, dense head that lasts throughout the glass.

Nose: Caramel-sweet with walnuts and spice at first. Then, orange peels and a hint of orange blossom. But the lingering impression is sweet fruitiness.

Palate: Rich, oily, and tongue-coating. Medium-level carbonation keeps the heavy mouthfeel from being cloying. Layers of bracing bitterness sandwiched between toffee-nut and pie spice. There's a definite citrus backdrop, as in the aroma, but it is not the overwhelming grapefruit of many American ales. Malt and hops play together very nicely.

Finish: Long and malty, bittersweet, with spice from the rye peppering the tongue.

This is a very nice ale that improves greatly as it warms up. I think in the future I'll try to drink this at about 55* instead of the 40ish it started at today. I also think this would pair beautifully with a good Stilton or a well-aged cheddar.
I love rye beers. The spiciness and rich mouthfeel is hard to match with other grains. In this beer, it balances what would otherwise just be another big IPA. Glad this is a permanent fixture in our market, unlike many of the pale ales I've picked up from other parts of the country on recent trips.

Phischy
08-12-2007, 23:20
Today I kegged 2 beers, a Double Red Ale at 8.35% ABV and a Extra Pale Ale at 5.53% ABV. Both were very tasty, and then I blew my overhoppped pale ale so the Extra Pale ale is now carbing.

The EPA will be the quickest brew to drink at 2 weeks I've ever done, my other tap has some 2 month old mocha porter. It also has chocolate and vanilla but it's so faint...too much coffee and it's a tad overpowering. Just have to tweak it next time!