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Possible George Dickel Rye?


cazolman
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Found a label approval on the COLA website for a George Dickel Rye.

https://www.ttbonline.gov/colasonline/viewColaDetails.do?action=publicFormDisplay&ttbid=12234001000261

The label reads that it is chill filtered through sugar-maple charcoal, the typical Tennessee or Lincoln county process. Has this style of rye ever been released before? With rye so popular, I am a bit surprised that JD and GD have not already released something.

Chad

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Bring it on, the more rye the better! That said, I really dislike those two words "chill filtered" - I know most do it, but it really neuters a whiskey.

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Looking at the label, this is the 95% rye mashbill from LDI/MGP. It will be, cut, filtered, and bottled at 90 proof.

It better have a damn good price point for us to buy it, when you consider Willett unfiltered, uncut is about 30 bucks a bottle

Edited by Phil T
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Looking at the label, it does't appear to be "from" them. Looks like another LDI/MGP sourced whiskey.

B

same thoughts, but beat my a minute to the posting!

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Interesting. Gentleman Jack is the only Tennessee whiskey that goes through the charcoal after aging. This is Bulleit Rye that's been Lincoln County-ized after aging. Wild stuff!

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So is it still considered the lincoln county process? Or must the charcoal filtering be done before going into the barrel?

It will be interesting to compare it to Bulleit Rye to see how the flavors change.

Chad

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So is it still considered the lincoln county process? Or must the charcoal filtering be done before going into the barrel?

It will be interesting to compare it to Bulleit Rye to see how the flavors change.

Chad

The Lincoln Country Process is nothing official. It's a pretty informal terminology, used by Daniel's primarily to refer to the pre-aging sugar maple filtration they do. Dickel uses smaller beds and chills the spirit first, but it's still new make. Charcoal filtering of this type is common and used to be even more common than it is now for whiskey. It's still used extensively for vodka.

In Dickel's case, I think it's a branding move as much as anything. What makes Tennessee Rye Tennessee? Well, there has to be some charcoal filtering involved, but since they wanted to use whiskey that's fully aged, they're doing it post-aging but can still point to it as "that Tennessee thing." Especially since this product wasn't made in Tennessee, they had to do something or else it would just be Bulleit in a Dickel bottle.

Charcoal filtering has many uses and I think we're going to be seeing a lot more of it.

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Charcoal filtering has many uses and I think we're going to be seeing a lot more of it.

Heaven Hill's eponymous BiB proclaims "Every Drop Charcoal Filtered," and I think the other HH-branded bottlings have similar language. The current Beam's Choice (green label) also makes a point of stating "Charcoal Filtered" on the label.

With regard to these, I have always made a few assumptions: 1) that most bourbons are charcoal filtered to one extent or another, 2) that Beam and HH label these as such in an attempt to make some sort of brand association with JD, and 3) that Beam's and HH's processes have virtually nothing in common with JD. Is that accurate? In Beam's case they say that it is filtered before bottling and I always figured that was HH's deal too.

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Heaven Hill's eponymous BiB proclaims "Every Drop Charcoal Filtered," and I think the other HH-branded bottlings have similar language. The current Beam's Choice (green label) also makes a point of stating "Charcoal Filtered" on the label.

With regard to these, I have always made a few assumptions: 1) that most bourbons are charcoal filtered to one extent or another, 2) that Beam and HH label these as such in an attempt to make some sort of brand association with JD, and 3) that Beam's and HH's processes have virtually nothing in common with JD. Is that accurate? In Beam's case they say that it is filtered before bottling and I always figured that was HH's deal too.

Most whiskeys are chill-filtered before bottling to prevent chill haze. This usually involves a small amount of charcoal, tiny compared to what Daniel's or Dickel use, but charcoal nonetheless. So, yes, your assumptions are correct. Beam and HH, in an attempt to confuse the Daniel's drinker, use that tiny amount of charcoal contact to claim charcoal filtering.

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The things I'm hearing about are post-aging. I'm surprised the micros haven't discovered it before now. It can make some of their very young products a lot more palatable.

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Looking at the label, this is the 95% rye mashbill from LDI/MGP. It will be, cut, filtered, and bottled at 90 proof.

It better have a damn good price point for us to buy it, when you consider Willett unfiltered, uncut is about 30 bucks a bottle

Edited by Shell
correction
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My assumption is that they bought LDI new make, ran it through their charcoal vats in Tullahoma, and barreled and aged it in Tullahoma, so Lunn did everything in Tullhoma except distill it.

Edited by cowdery
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My assumption is that they bought LDI new make, ran it through their charcoal vats in Tullahoma, and barreled and aged it in Tullahoma, so Lumm did everything in Tullhoma except distill it.

OK, from the thread I was assuming they just bought aged rye and then ran it through the charcoal before bottling.

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That might be right. I've looked over the promo materials and can't find a clue. They do say it's at least 5 years old. It's possible they were thinking about this in 2007. When was that video dated, where Lunn has the bottle on his desk? I've made an inquiry.

By the way, I like the $24.99 price point very much. Yet another reason to not buy Templeton.

Edited by cowdery
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That might be right. I've looked over the promo materials and can't find a clue. They do say it's at least 5 years old. It's possible they were thinking about this in 2007. When was that video dated, where Lunn has the bottle on his desk? I've made an inquiry.

By the way, I like the $24.99 price point very much. Yet another reason to not buy Templeton.

The new Rye label states "We start with the finest distilled Rye whisky in the world. Then we finish it the classic way..." The No. 12 label specifies its "sweet maple mellowing" before "he sent it to age". If I can read any truth in the Rye label with the word "finish" it would be that it is being maple-charcoal filtered after barreling and before bottling. https://www.ttbonline.gov/colasonline/viewColaDetails.do?action=publicFormDisplay&ttbid=12234001000261

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I will try it, as I am a big dickel fan. I just wonder why in hell they did not just empty the fermenters in Tullahoma, make a rye mash and run it themselves. Could have made a good amount in a week. It being ldi takes a lot of the spirit out of the spirit.

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I agree with Tom, to go to all this other trouble seems odd when you can make it easily yourself, especially as Dickel has never been IIRC a full-year operation i.e., full operations every day except for any summer closing period. (And even if they were...). Anyway, at 5 years aged it should be good.

I doubt by the way it was put through the maple charcoal process after dumping. They would have done that before barreling almost certainly, but I could be wrong of course.

Gary

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I had some of the rye in Chicago 2 weeks ago. It is LDI rye filtered through the charcoal vats at Dickel. It did give it a bit of a sweet and smokey taste i rather liked, but it was just one sip from the sample bottle. I would have liked to have spent more time with it.

Mike Veach

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