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What is a Cocktail?


sailor22
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I saw one on in a shop a couple of hours from here - so I guess the answer is yes, maybe. That's the only place I have ever seen it and they only had one. It isn't here in Tallahassee.

I should check the proof on the one I saw to make sure it is the same bottling Gary is talking about.

Sounds intriguing from the write up...might be worth the road trip Steve. Looking forward to trying this one Gary and whatever you determime how it best be imbibed ;).

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As (I will hazard) one of the few on the forum to possess a bottle of Smith & Cross Traditional Jamaican Rum 57% ABV, I offer my nearly full bottle to the Gazebo table in April if others will bring the other ingredients.

We can re-dub the second cocktail tanstaafl2 mentioned, the NAFTA Giant.

Gary

As this is a pretty regular cocktail for me I have all the necessary ingredients on hand including the delightful S&C rum (there is only one proof so if you have a bottle you have the right one!) so I would be happy to bring the necessary fixin's for this cocktail (and the others I mentioned as well if desired) on my "maiden" voyage to the gazebo. Presuming someone reminds me to do so closer to April!

S&C rum, along with many of the other very interesting and unusual cocktail mixers made available by Haus Alpenz, are more readily available at larger stores in Atlanta these days than was the case even a year or two ago.

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Excellent, that is very good of you. My almost full bottle will be there and I look forward to this interesting drink. Many on the board enjoy rum and we by no means drink only bourbon at these events even though it is the focal point.

Gary

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I also prefer the more traditional definition(s) of cocktails. I will only give examples, not trying to get to a precise definition.

A Manhattan or a Sazerac is certainly a cocktail. So is a traditional martini. I would include drinks such as traditional whiskey sours, margaritas, and daquiris. But, to me, a frozen margarita or daquiri would not be a cocktail. I am not sure what the hell they should be called.

A very diluted drink such as a whiskey and soda or a JD and Coke would be a highball, not a cocktail. Even if bitters were added.

I recall another old definition of a cocktail as being "3 parts strong, 2 parts sour, 1 part sweet". I may have the proportions wrong, but it was something like that, and bitters were not mentioned. It was still a stiff drink. I think my general definition would be that, once you have diluted the spirit to less than about 50:50, you have gone outside the realm of cocktails. But, just spirits and ice don't qualify either, as there must be some additional flavoring components.

Tim

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It's a timeless question and of course the answers change as our sensibilities change. Is a vatting of rum 'n' rye, taken neat a cocktail? Probably, at least as much as a rum 'n' Coke is...

Around here, the word is a catch-all for any alcoholic drink, although the pronunciation seems to vary a little in this usage. Example: "Joe slipped on the ice last night and broke his wrist. Of course, he'd already had a coupla cyacktells in him," she said with a knowing wink. "Cyacktells" here might refer to Grainbelt Premiums, Philips Vodka, or brandy 'n' waters....

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I once knew a gent from the mid-west who used the term in that sense, of any alcohol drink. He pronounced it almost, "cacktail", which to me had a mid-west twang to it. I feel you can hear faint German and Scandinavian accents in mid-west speech, but that is getting off-topic!

Gary

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Yes, Gary, that's exactly what I'm talking about. Cacktail, cyacktell, it varies a bit depending on which of the Great Lakes you're closest to, but it seem that the catch-all usage goes hand in hand with the accent.

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Thanks for reminding me of high balls Tim, an appropriate term one doesn't hear too often now. As for the concoctions that rhyme with 'tini'

I believe they are best called 'leg spreaders'.

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There's something comforting about seeing the marquee sign for dining establishments in the Mid-West that advertise "Cocktails" on them, on a cold Winter's night. They're even better when they're in neon. Only seldomly do you see "cocktails" on similar signs here, Down South.

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There's something comforting about seeing the marquee sign for dining establishments in the Mid-West that advertise "Cocktails" on them, on a cold Winter's night. They're even better when they're in neon. Only seldomly do you see "cocktails" on similar signs here, Down South.
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