Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
cowdery

New Jim Beam Book

This topic has been inactive for at least 365 days, and is now closed. Please feel free to start a new thread on the subject! 

Recommended Posts

cowdery

Paul Pacult has a new book coming about about Jim Beam. He'll be at the Bourbon Festival. I haven't seen the book and all I know about it is in the sample pages on Amazon but I already have a quibble...with the dust jacket. Several times in the dust jacket copy they describe Jim Beam as a "family business." Unfortunately, it hasn't been a family business of the Beam family since they sold it in the 1940s. After that for about 20 years it was a "family business," but the family was the Blum family. Thereafter and ever since it has been as corporate as corporate gets, as part of what is now Fortune Brands.

Of course, I'm mainly just jealous. Why can't I get one of those corporate front gigs? I could use the money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boone

I've got it...When I got home from work last night, the book was sitting on my desk...I told Pat, that you said it was available, (in your post)...He went to Barnes and Noble a picked it up... grin.gifgrin.gif A very good surprise to come home to grin.gifgrin.gif...

A nice addition to my collection...Although, it's gonna be awhile before I have time to sit down and read it...

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

post-20-14489811236524_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bluesbassdad

Bettye Jo,

Thanks so much for the photo. The cover design is simply stunning. The photograph makes me feel as though I'm actually there, and the arrangement of the text perfectly complements the interplay of shadow and light.

However, ya know what they say about judging a book...

I've taken exception to other writings by the author in the past. I will be eagerly awaiting the opinion of you and others as to whether it's worth my long-ago hard-earned money.

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boone

Dave,

I read a little of the book, during my supper break, last night...Skimmin here and there...I found this one section...page 52...Jacob Beam's deep but light and savory secret...I just pushed back in my chair...just a grinnin and shakin my head...The secret? Jacob, being of German descent, enthusiatically relished grin.gif BEER grin.gif!!!!... grin.gif Ohhhhhhhhhhh Yeahhhhhhhhhhh grin.gif...

Most of ya know, that I have never hid the fact, that I drink BEER...and that I only drink Bourbon on special occasions...

I'm still grin.gif smilin grin.gif thinkin about him... I wish there were pictures so I could see his face...

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

BTW: Today, is a special ocassion...Break out the bottle of Elijah Craig 18 yr toast.gifdrink.gif...We (me and Pat) celebrate our grin.gif wedding anniversary grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pepcycle

Congratulations on your anniversary. I toast you with the '91 EWSB in an EWSB glass. toast.giftoast.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

I got my copy, Soon I hope to be autographed by as many of the folks who make up this saga that will do it .

I'm only a few pages into it, I am enjoying it immensely. grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boone

Hey Dave,

Go here American Still Life web page to get a look inside the book and read a bit of it...

They have pages you can read in the book (on thier web page, then links to amazon.com)...I have not looked at it very close but if it happens to show page 177...This is my branch of Beams... Beam Generations at Heaven Hill. It tells about Joseph L. Beam (my great-grandfather) and Harry Beam (my grandfather) grin.gif

I have been reading this book... (not finished yet)...Details later when I finish...

It walks you through the life of Jacob Beam (and goes right down to the present day decendants) and American History...Takes you through the good and bad times...Litterally, walks you through the events in American history and how they (Beams) coped with it and made it through...

Ya know...200+ years is a "long time" in fame, for a family of Distiller's...

The tile of the book is perfect...

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bluesbassdad

Bettye Jo,

Thanks for the reference. I'll take a look.

Ya know...200+ years is a "long time" in fame, for a family of Distiller's...

That reminds me of a quote that I found illuminating -- and this was well before certain disagreements came to the surface during the last several months.

To summarize the difference between Europe and America someone said the following. "Americans think 100 years is a long time. Europeans think 100 miles is a long distance."

Nevertheless, you are quite right. In our Country, so recently prominent on the world stage, 200+ years of known lineage is, perhaps, unsurpassed, especially when tied so intimately to the history of the Country itself every step of the way.

As someone who comes from a family tree with hidden roots, a rotten trunk, and many broken brances, I am envious, but in a completely friendly way.

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

I'm about half thru this book and all I can say is, It's fantastic. Pages 126 and 127 very clearly Place Carl Beam in the thick of things and his importance to placing Jim Beam on the top of the heap in the worldwide game. American Still Life tells the story well , at every pivotal juncture in the Beam story, Mr. Pacult adds the history of the day, From the end of the Revolution to the Civil War, Prohibition , 2 World Wars. At every step it tells how each generation of Beams played the hand they were dealt and kept the fire under the still going, except for 14 years, there.Another fact is that Jim's brother, Park established a line of Master Distillers, Carl Beam and his sons Baker and David At Jim Beam, and Earl Beam who was with Carl at Jim Beam and left to be Master Distiller at Heaven Hill and son Parker and grandson Craig. The only quibbles I have is a 10 year bust on when the Murphy-Barber distillery began( 1881 as opposed to this book stating 1891) A picture of Booker in a cinder block room full of new barrels that is labeled a Rackhouse. Minor points that do not detract at all from the overall story. I think Sally VanWinkle Campbell's Book , " But Always Fine Bourbon" was a better page turner for me , but only slightly.

BTW Jim Beam at Clermont are on their yearly shut down , Maybe the Bottling lines are back up this week, They are spending what appears to be an enormous amount of money on the physical plant, and have come up with a Dark Forest Green and Brick Red paint motif. They are painting Window Frames, Doors and Silos a very glossy Black. They have cleaned the Distillery building which has precast Exposed aggregate concrete panels on it, resealed the joints and are applying a sealer that really brings out the color of the pea gravel. grin.gif

toast.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

Unfortunately, it hasn't been a family business of the Beam family since they sold it in the 1940s

He addresses this, actually it hasn't been a Beam family business since they quit for Prohibition. When Jim Beam started back he had 3 investors ( Phillip Blum, Homel, Jacobson) who owned it and he and family members worked for them. Schenley tried to buy it and was going to drop Blum, which didn't set well so his son Harry bought the other 2 guys out in 1941, for 1 million. Not a bad return on 10,000 dollars in 7 years!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bluesbassdad

Bobby,

You've sold me. I've a Border's gift certificate that's been scorching my pocket for a while now. Tomorrow I'll probably take a notion to take a little stroll downtown.

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

If you do you'll be posting Jim Beam products' names in the WAYDN forum! toast.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cowdery

It's interesting that Beam is investing in the appearance of the facility. I never disliked the assorted pastels that have adorned the buildings for as long as I can remember. It never occurred to me that it could look better. I'll be interested to hear your assessment of it when everything is complete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

They placed it on the Post Office building first, formerly a farm house.Coincidentally Baker was born in that house. I understood that if they like that it would be used elsewhere,It was something to get used to But things proceeded in rapid fashion after that, The truck shop, Boiler room , Fermenting Building etc. I like it, it causes parts of that jumble of buildings to stand distinct from the rest. Like you I liked the Pastels especially when they had all the warehouses in those light blues, reds, and green. It was all a little faded, They could have went 10 more years without painting it. It is really starting to look formal and dignified.Not that it didn't, just more so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cowdery

I have mixed feelings about it, and this is without having seen it. On the one hand, I don't like the things I like to change. On the other hand, it makes me happy to hear that the Beam company (headquartered here in Chicago) is starting to recognize the value of its Kentucky assets.

On the other other hand, when do you paint your house? When you put it on the market! There's no evidence of that. It's just a rumor I'm starting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cowdery

In fairness, I should point out that dustjackets are seldom written by the author and are usually written by PR people who haven't even read the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

I'll let you start that one if you want. I think they are drowning in money. I have witnessed them spending it by the bucketfulls especially in the past 4-5 years. They are even removing Chain link fences and replacing with wrought iron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barrel_Proof

They are even removing Chain link fences and replacing with wrought iron.

Few of us would complain about similar improvements to our neighborhoods!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

Alright back to the book. Our own Chuck Cowdery here may be too modest to say so, or maybe not. I've never been shy about going out on a limb , so here goes. F. Paul Pacult has Chucks' articles listed as some of his source material.

" Who Invented Bourbon" Malt Advocate Vol 11,No.4 2002, and

" The Beams:America's First Family of Bourbon" Malt Advocate, Vol 10, No. 2 2001

toast.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barrel_Proof

Chuck be da man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

Few of us would complain about similar improvements to our neighborhoods!

Not a problem! They are dolling that ol' mule up real pretty. grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Forbes

Thanks for your opinions on the new book. It sound like a good read. I'll plan to pick up a copy at the festival.

Todd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc
grin.gif

post-73-14489811238616_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cowdery

Do all of the buildings in that picture have the new paint job?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobbyc

Everything in the foreground does. The red building to the left of the Distillery building hasn't been painted in a while. Of higher up expect nothing to happen to the brick buildings. Also notice the large JIM BEAM logo is gone from the distillery( It was above the large opening) I don't know if we are to expect something new and better( Include the Red Seal) or if they are just being repainted and will go back on after all the sealing is finished. Some of the wrought iron fence is visible by the lagoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.