Jump to content

Book Recommendation


This topic has been inactive for at least 365 days, and is now closed. Please feel free to start a new thread on the subject! 

Recommended Posts

I'm interested in buying a book or two that deal with or can be applied to dusty hunting. I did several searches and came across a few bourbon history books that look really interesting, but none directly relating to the subject. I've found several online blogs which feature dusty related topics but so far, no books. Any recommendations?

Link to post
Share on other sites

This site is a better hunting reference than any book could ever be.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Scott is telling you true the last whiskey book I bought was full of so much shit it wasn't funny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryan, I think that you'll find that "dusty hunting" isn't a the sort of pastime anyone's really going to write a book about Those who engage in it have a vested interest in keeping the number of competitors down and the pricing low on old bottles -- vintage wine pricing is a good example of price increases on old bottles.

The internet is a great source of information on old bottles, old labels, and old advertising, put your search-engine skills to work!

Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, there's no difinitive book on the topic. I have about 30 bourbon books in my library, and most touch on historic bottlings in some way, but not in the way you are after.. I think you'll find you would have to pull the information from multiple sources - books, internet, videos etc and put your own fact sheet together.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryan, the subject matter doesn't lend itself to book form because there are no set rules or tactics that will work everywhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bryan, the subject matter doesn't lend itself to book form because there are no set rules or tactics that will work everywhere.

You just need a good bird dog. A few years back my son (aged 5 then) sniffed out a dozen 375ml bottles of ER10/101 because he "liked the bird on the label." Forget the book, you need kids!:lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think Scott is telling you true the last whiskey book I bought was full of so much shit it wasn't funny.
Edited by p_elliott
Link to post
Share on other sites
Bryan, I think that you'll find that "dusty hunting" isn't a the sort of pastime anyone's really going to write a book about Those who engage in it have a vested interest in keeping the number of competitors down and the pricing low on old bottles -- vintage wine pricing is a good example of price increases on old bottles.

The internet is a great source of information on old bottles, old labels, and old advertising, put your search-engine skills to work!

Thanks for all the replies. I'm definitely doing the above regarding the internet and also trying to make my own cheat sheets.

When I get interested in something, I tend to get a bit obsessive and figured a book would be another great resource to delve into. I guess I will have to keep being creative, which makes the whole process even more interesting and fun.

Thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're welcome! Now get out there and start looking for the Liquor Store that Time Forgot!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Hidden

This site is without a doubt the best place to go forinfo. That being said, however two good books worth owning as part of anyrespectable whisky library are Chuck Cowdery's "Bourbon Straight: TheUncut and Unfiltered Story of American Whiskey", (great job on this bookChuck) and "Bourbon: The Evolution of Kentucky Whiskey" by Sam KCecil.

They both provide actual facts as opposed to therelentlessly repeated fables and tall tales. There is a significant amount ofmisinformation out there in print and even more online. Actual foot-noted (orend-noted) scholarship with documentation is rare. This combined withnon-distiller producers who call themselves distillers, even though they onlybuy barrels from actual distillers means there are a lot of fables, myths,half-truths and just plain lies out there.

Tread carefully and when in doubt – come back here. Good luck.

Link to post

This site is without a doubt the best place to go for info. That being said, however two good books worth owning as part of any respectable whisky library are Chuck Cowdery's "Bourbon Straight: The Uncut and Unfiltered Story of American Whiskey", (great job on this book Chuck) and "Bourbon: The Evolution of Kentucky Whiskey" by Sam K Cecil.

They both provide actual facts as opposed to the relentlessly repeated fables and tall tales. There is a significant amount of misinformation out there in print and even more online. Actual foot-noted (or end-noted) scholarship with documentation is rare. This combined with non-distiller producers who call themselves distillers, even though they only buy barrels from actual distillers means there are a lot of fables, myths, half-truths and just plain lies out there.

Tread carefully and when in doubt – come back here. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.