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maybeling

Book recommendations?

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maybeling

Hopefully this is in the right place... I enjoy reading about whiskey almost as much as drinking it. Almost. Was wondering what books folks would recommend I add to my little whiskey library. I suspect several people will be thinking I need Chuck Cowdery's titles, and I'm inclined to agree, just haven't bought 'em yet. :)

Here is what I currently have in no particular order at all (this is from memory, I may be forgetting one or so):

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey: An American Heritage (Veach)

Whiskey Opus (Roskrow)

Michael Jackson's Complete Guide to Single Malt Scotch (Jackson)

Whiskey and Philosphy: A Small Batch of Spirited Ideas (Allhoff)

The Kings County Distillery Guide to Urban Moonshining: How to Make and Drink Whiskey (Haskell)

Bourbon: A History of the American Spirit (Huckelbridge)

Whiskypedia: A Compendium of Scottish Whisky (MacLean)

Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide (Reigler)

American Whiskey, Bourbon & Rye: A Guide to the Nation’s Favorite Spirit (Risen)

1001 Whiskies You Must Taste Before You Die (Roskrow)

Here is my current amazon wish list:

http://amzn.com/w/1QWTTZGK4L4UG

What do you think I should acquire and/or read next?

What is your favorite whiskey (or whisky) book?

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callmeox

Bourbon Straight by Chuck Cowdery is must.

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sutton

About Scotch, but Ralfy recommended the following and I enjoyed:

The Whiskey Distilleries of the United Kingdom, Alfred Barnard

Peat Smoke and Spirit, Andrew Jefford

Whisky, Aeneas MacDonald

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T Comp
Bourbon Straight by Chuck Cowdery is must.

You mean you still don't do the pop quiz on it before approving membership Scott :grin:.

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kjbeggs

Maybeling, you can get "But Always Fine Bourbon..." from pappyco.com for around $50. One of the few times amazon is not your best option. I got a copy of it for Christmas, but haven't found time to read it yet.

I've also heard good things about "Whiskey Women" (the book, not women who drink whiskey in general, although I've heard things about them too...)

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ModernThirst
Maybeling, you can get "But Always Fine Bourbon..." from pappyco.com for around $50. One of the few times amazon is not your best option. I got a copy of it for Christmas, but haven't found time to read it yet.

I've also heard good things about "Whiskey Women" (the book, not women who drink whiskey in general, although I've heard things about them too...)

Whiskey Women is a good read...very enlightening.

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fishnbowljoe

The bourbon related books in my "library" are:

Bourbon Straight, by Charles Cowdery

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey-An American Heritage, by Michael R. Veach

But Always Fine Bourbon-Pappy Van Winkle And The Story Of Old Fitzgerald, by Sally Van Winkle Campbell

Kentucky Bourbon-The Early Years Of Whiskey Making, by Henry G. Crowgey

The Book Of Bourbon-And Other Fine American Whiskeys, by Gary Regan and Mardee Haidin Regan

The Evolution Of The Bourbon Whiskey Industry In Kentucky, by Sam K. Cecil

Maker's Mark-My Autobiography, by Bill Samuels Jr.

The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book, by Joy Perrine and Susan Ziegler

Cheers! Joe

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maybeling

Bourbon, Straight & Whiskey Women ordered. :)

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kjbeggs

I've been very tempted to read Chuck's book on A.H. Hirsch, but I know where there's a bottle (the Humidor package) for sale, and i don't need anything else influencing me to throw that kind of money at a bottle.

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Kalessin
I've been very tempted to read Chuck's book on A.H. Hirsch, but I know where there's a bottle (the Humidor package) for sale, and i don't need anything else influencing me to throw that kind of money at a bottle.

You might find the contents of the book more satisfying than the contents of the bottle... :)

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PaulO

I found a book at my in-laws house and they let me have it. It belonged to my wife's grandfather; The Social History Of Bourbon by Gerald Carson published in 1963. I don't know how easy it would be to find a copy. Carson wrote about the beginning of whiskey in colonial times up to the early 1960s. I found it interesting to compare brands and distilleries mentioned in the book with what's still around.

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PaulO

I looked at your wish list. If you have interest in classic cocktails, there is a good book that came out a couple years ago called Imbide.

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cowdery

Carson's book is excellent despite being 50 years old. University of Kentucky Press reprinted it in 2010 so it should be readily available. I believe it's also available from them as an ebook.

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bourbonv

Downard's Dictionary of American Brewing and Distilling Industry should be on everyone's bookshelf.

Mike Veach

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cowdery

Agreed, but that's a hard get. I think I paid $60 for my copy. Have your buddies at UK Press said anything about reprinting it?

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Guest
Carson's book is excellent despite being 50 years old. University of Kentucky Press reprinted it in 2010 so it should be readily available. I believe it's also available from them as an ebook.

I grabbed a copy a couple years ago from amazon, very good read.

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Kalessin

I'm about halfway through Huckelbridge's "Bourbon, a History of the American Spirit". I'm kind of glad that I could borrow it from the local library, as I don't think I need to buy one to keep on the bookshelf for future re-reading.

It's less a studious history and more a fairly raucous history-story with lots of everything thrown in; the Washington Post says "a mashup of social history and personal commentary", which I agree with. It's still an enjoyable read, best after the second pour of the evening.

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HighHorse
I'm about halfway through Huckelbridge's "Bourbon, a History of the American Spirit"...

I read this last month and found it one of the best bourbon reads ever. I'm very impressed with Huckelbridge's writing style and find his "history-story" manner to me comfortable reading. Some of his paragraphs are plain out fantastic and this is his first book. Another local reader (Sailor) noted that Huckelbridge's discroption of how whiskey is made is the best description he's ever read. His supporting documentation on things like where the first "bourbon" was made in the US and George Washington's Mt. Vernon distillery likely mash bills looks solid to me.

I would encourage any and all bourbon folk to give this book a read. You won't regret it.

(Full Disclosure): I don't even know this guy Huckelbridge ... but .. I'd like to meet him!

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HighHorse

I give a copy of Chuck's book to all my buddies who are .. or get in to .. bourbon & Chuck has been good enough to sign them.

I wish Chuck would sit down and write the follow up ... or the updated version. A lot has happened in the spirits world .. especially bourbon .. in the past ten years or so.

How 'bout it, Chuck?

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cowdery

New book is almost finished. Out shortly.

I found Huckelbridge's book entertaining and an easy read, but someone already well versed in the subject probably won't learn anything. I thought some of his analysis was very good and although I didn't learn anything new factually, he provides some interesting perspectives, ways of looking at things, that are original and penetrating. I tend to look at the business as a business and from an insider's perspective, because I have been associated with the industry for most of my career. He looks at it as a true outsider and from a sociological perspective, which is interesting. I think maybe he tries a little too hard to be 'edgy,' but as someone pointed out, it is his first book. He may still be looking for his voice.

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maybeling

Seems this has little gem has snuck out into the wild without much fanfare :)

Bourbon, Strange by Charles K. Cowdery

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MNWKS1Y/

I pre-ordered the paperback (current pub. date says 9/5/14) which then allowed me to get the Kindle version now for $2.99. Looking forward to setting aside some time to read this one Chuck!

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paddockjudge

Dave Broom’s new release, "Whisky: The Manual" is a must have (besides Chuck's new book).

My favourite is "Canadian Whisky: The Portable Expert" by Davin de Kergommeaux.

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smokinjoe
Seems this has little gem has snuck out into the wild without much fanfare :)

Bourbon, Strange by Charles K. Cowdery

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MNWKS1Y/

I pre-ordered the paperback (current pub. date says 9/5/14) which then allowed me to get the Kindle version now for $2.99. Looking forward to setting aside some time to read this one Chuck!

Thanks for the heads up, Mike. I know what just got added to my Christmas list!

I can't help but giggle a little at the title, "Bourbon Strange". Sounds like a Jeopardy clue with this answer: "What is a one night stand during KBF"?... :lol: I'll grow up one of these days...:D

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heydobro

I'm in the middle of reading "Proof" by Adam Rogers. He is a writer for Wired magazine and it is a book on the science of alcohol and has chapters on yeast, fermentation, distilling, aging and more. I'm a very slow reader so it's taking me a while, but it's a lot more in depth than the tidbits they give you on distillery tours

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0547897960?pc_redir=1408257420&robot_redir=1

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mhatzung
I'm in the middle of reading "Proof" by Adam Rogers. He is a writer for Wired magazine and it is a book on the science of alcohol and has chapters on yeast, fermentation, distilling, aging and more.

I'll second this book. I'm just finishing it up and I was very impressed with the easy to understand way Adam Rogers is able to explain the science behind alcohol yet keep the book very humorous and entertaining. A must read for any liquor enthusiast who is curious of the why's of alcohol.

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