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Enoch

"Pumpkin Pie" Bourbon

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Enoch

I have attempted to make "pumpkin pie" bourbon. Sort of based on the premise of "Apple Pie" (Justified).

I used Old Charter 10, vanilla bean, cinnamon stick, brown sugar, baked pumpkin slices form a party next Friday.

I'm interested in anyone else s ideas on this. I'll post how it turns out.

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Gillman

Good thinking there, it sounds wonderful for an after-dinner dram. Just a suggestion, but for another batch, add dried apple slices. In England, pumpkin and apple have been combined in pies for hundreds of years. Pumpkin is American but migrated there very early and the use of apple is an interesting complement. I'd advise this if the "squashy" taste is too pronounced in your current essay.

Gary

Edited by Gillman

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oke&coke
Good thinking there, it sounds wonderful for an after-dinner dram. Just a suggestion, but for another batch, add dried apple slices. In England, pumpkin and apple have been combined in pies for hundreds of years. Pumpkin is American but migrated there very early and the use of apple is an interesting complement. I'd advise this if the "squashy" taste is too pronounced in your current essay.

Gary

Sorry to thread drift a bit but when I was working at a bakery we did a pumpkin pie with apples on the bottom for thanksgiving. Quite good actually. Give it a shot Enoch. Let us know how it comes out.

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Gillman

Good to hear that (re the apples and pumpkin in U.S. pies), testament surely to old connections between America and Britain whence so many immigrants came.

Gary

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sutton

We do this (pumpkin pie with apple slices on bottom) in my neck of the woods for Thanksgiving. Along with the traditional spices, there is some cardamom that lightens it up a bit. The pumpkin puree is from roasted sugar pumpkins, so that should be similar to your baked pumpkin slices and address Gary's comment on keeping it from getting too "squashy".

You've given me an idea for this Thanksgiving though - some bourbon into the pumpkin/apple pie!

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kjbeggs
I have attempted to make "pumpkin pie" bourbon. Sort of based on the premise of "Apple Pie" (Justified).

I used Old Charter 10, vanilla bean, cinnamon stick, brown sugar, baked pumpkin slices form a party next Friday.

I'm interested in anyone else s ideas on this. I'll post how it turns out.

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GaryT

Definitely looking forward to hearing how this goes. I love Corsair's "Old Punk", and imagine it is a pale likeness to what you've got going on there!

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Enoch

It's been almost three weeks. I had planned to use it Halloween but had to take wife to the ER so I let it sit. Tasting every other night or so, The vanilla bean came out first, followed by cinnamon, finally fruity pumpkin taste. Even wife likes it. There seems to be two philosophies about about pumpkin prep. Bake for 40 minutes at 400 or 24 hours at 175. I used the first because it was quicker. It does seem to add a lot of liquid to solution. I just got another sugar pumpkin so I am going to try the latter to see if there is a difference in taste. I'll report back later.

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soonami

Most of the flavor we ascribe to pumpkin pie is in the mix of the spices. Pumpkin Spice coffee and beer often do not contain pumpkin at all because the flavor is fairly mild and it can give off an unpleasant astringency and vegetal green bell pepper note if used in high quantities. For this reason, I think that roasted pumpkin itself is really quite unnecessary, if anything use something sweeter like butter nut squash and really cook it down so that it's almost dried

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GaryT

Started a jar of this. I baked the pumpkin slices down for 10 hours at 200 degrees. Have 2 cinnamon sticks, a vanilla bean, a whole nutmeg, a star anise and some whole cloves (the anise and cloves are in cheesecloth sachets so I can pull them out independently). Using Old Ezra 7yr 101, and poured the bourbon over the pumpkin right after taking it out of the oven. Figure the anise and cloves will be the first things to get pulled (maybe just a day or two?), and I'll check periodically on the rest. Hoping it will be done by Thanksgiving (almost two weeks?).

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mosugoji64

Your idea inspired me to try my own infusion. I used some Old Fitz Prime and added a sachet of pumpkin pie spice, a cinnamon stick, and a vanilla bean. After about 4 days, I removed the cinnamon stick as the cinnamon flavor was overpowering everything else. The sachet came out a couple of days later. The vanilla bean is still in but will probably come out tomorrow. After about a week, the infusion smells and tastes like liquid spice cake. It is delicious! The empty glass is sitting in front of me as I type this and the smell is delightful. Thank you very much, Enoch, for the idea!

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GaryT

I found out the hard way that a little anise goes a long way. Just 12 hours in and I had to pull it, and after giving it a few days for the rest of the players to catch up - wound up dumping half the bourbon out and replacing it. Still more licorice on the nose than I'm looking for, but hoping more time will help the others catch up. Probably pulling the cinnamon tonight or tomorrow.

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CL

Enoch, I hope the wife is fine after her ER visit.

I have always enjoyed bourbon with pumpkin pie. I am lazy so I am quite content to use this method:

1. Take bite of homemade pumpkin pie.

2. Sip bourbon.

It's pretty fantastic for my purposes. :-) Good luck to everyone with their infusions.

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Enoch

An interesting conclusion to my experiment. I set aside about a pint of the infusion and let it sit for about a month in the fridge. As you can see it seperated.

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I then siphoned off a sample from the top and the bottom and did a SBS tasting

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Conclusion: The clear sample (left) was a wonderful whiskey with all the taste expected. The cloudy (right) appears to be largely juice extracted from the pumpkin and had very little whiskey taste.

Next time I am going to desiccate the pumpkin in the oven and see how it compares. And in the future I am going to make it up at least a month in advance and give it a chance to separate.

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