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johnnybogey

Building Home Bar.....Need your opinion and progress report

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Which would you choose  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. Which would you choose

    • Refrigerator with freezer, on the rocks baby
      14
    • Beverage Center, I sometimes like wine too
      3
    • Neither. You need more shelf room for Bourbon
      13


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johnnybogey

hey guys,

As some of you know, I was inspired by the "Pictures of your Home Bar" thread to build a back bar in my basement. Many thanks BourbonDork's Blog for the design layout.

I need your help though.

I am looking to put in either a) a compact refrigerator with freezer B) a beverage center dual zone for both beer and wine.

Each has its pros and cons as noted below.

Refridgerator with freezer

Pro - has a freezer so I don't have to go upstairs for times when I want to have a pour on the rocks. :bigeyes:

Con - can't hold wine

Beverage Center

Pro - can hold both wine and beer :grin:

Con - no freezer

Here is what I got built thus far. At a stopping point because the Fridge or Beverage center will be installed under the counter in the middle. Depending on which I go with will dictate the split between this compartment that holds the fridge/beverage center and other side which will hold TBD.

A picture of my progress thus far. All in all, a fund project so far. Only a few busted knuckles and gigantic splinters.

Thanks in advance

ZGcq3Rzl.jpg

Edited by johnnybogey

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tanstaafl2
hey guys,

As some of you know, I was inspired by the "Pictures of your Home Bar" thread to build a back bar in my basement. Many thanks BourbonDork's Blog for the design layout.

I need your help though.

I am looking to put in either a) a compact refrigerator with freezer B) a beverage center dual zone for both beer and wine.

Each has its pros and cons as noted below.

Refridgerator with freezer

Pro - has a freezer so I don't have to go upstairs for times when I want to have a pour on the rocks. :bigeyes:

Con - can't hold wine

Beverage Center

Pro - can hold both wine and beer :grin:

Con - no freezer

Here is what I got built thus far. At a stopping point because the Fridge or Beverage center will be installed under the counter in the middle. Depending on which I go with will dictate the split between this compartment that holds the fridge/beverage center and other side which will hold TBD.

A picture of my progress thus far. All in all, a fund project so far. Only a few busted knuckles and gigantic splinters.

Thanks in advance

http://imgur.com/ZGcq3Rz' rel="external nofollow">

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Harry in WashDC

Got space in some other corner for a small freezer? We compromised - a beer/wine/soda (no ice) undercounter fridge near the bar area and, in a far corner of the basement, a 3 cu ft freezer from Costco (under/about $250) for ice and funny shaped frozen stuff that takes up too much space in the upstairs fridge. Nice big plastic ice bucket suitable for indoor/outdoor use sits on top.

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Richnimrod

Ice at a convenient distance can be a time/steps saver; but I only use ice occasionally myself, and the extra steps, especially up and down stairs is actually a waistline plus.

Now, if you do a good deal of entertaining ... serving drinks, both hard and soft, this may be a virtual necessity.

Your/and your wife's lifestyle (assuming you are married) should dictate the functionality needed beyond purely storage space.

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petrel800

You could always go with a table top ice maker. I've seen them at home depot for around $150. May give you best of both worlds with the beverage center and an ice maker.

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GaryT

What are wine and beer? I see those offered at places that don't offer bourbon . . . although in my defense . . . it could be that as soon as I find bourbon available, I stop looking at other beverage options :lol:

Seriously though, I like Mark's suggestion - especially if the ice is something that doesn't come up often and is more for entertaining. A tabletop model could be tucked away when not in use or needed. Looks great so far though!! Nicely done John!

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R-Savage

Need a Beer Fridge, I like Wine, and I need space for my Bourbon and other whisky's

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johnnybogey

Ok guys. Ended up going with the compact refrigerator. After hours of research, it seemed like you really need to drop a few hundred dollars for a good beverage center/wine fridge. All the reviews I've read of the lower tier units had bad reviews.

Made some good progress tonight. The selection of the fridge/beverage center, etc... was holding things up as I needed to know the width of the unit so that I could put up a divider to support the counter top.

Hopefully I can get the rest of the counter completed this week so that by the weekend, I can sand, stain and poly.

Thanks for the suggestions guys.

post-12100-14489822117235_thumb.jpg

post-12100-14489822117235_thumb.jpg

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Richnimrod

Coming along very nicely, my friend. Hat's are off to you! I look forward to viewing the finished edifice (I expect to enjoy it vicariously that way).

I think you made the absolute best compromise by keeping the space open and adding the small fridge below. Will you install shelves in the space to the left of the fridge?

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johnnybogey
Coming along very nicely, my friend. Hat's are off to you! I look forward to viewing the finished edifice (I expect to enjoy it vicariously that way).

I think you made the absolute best compromise by keeping the space open and adding the small fridge below. Will you install shelves in the space to the left of the fridge?

Thanks Rich for the motivation.

As for the space to the left, I plan to build a cabinet with shelves to hold glassware and items that I wouldn't want sitting on the shelves, e.g. shaker, muddler, etc...

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tanstaafl2

Look great! Given the counter depth I would almost wish that the shelves were as deep as the counter. I can see myself constantly whacking into the front corners of the counter and more shelf space is always a good thing! And if you don't initially need all the shelf space you can always bring the bottles towards the front. But then I have a lot of bottles.

My motto after all is "too much is never enough!". :cool:

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johnnybogey
Look great! Given the counter depth I would almost wish that the shelves were as deep as the counter. I can see myself constantly whacking into the front corners of the counter and more shelf space is always a good thing! And if you don't initially need all the shelf space you can always bring the bottles towards the front. But then I have a lot of bottles.

My motto after all is "too much is never enough!". :cool:

Tell me about it! The current plans are wife approved. To resubmit design plans could be costly. :cool:

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johnnybogey

Ok, need some more opinions.

I've never owned a lazy boy type of chair or recliner but I think one or two would be appropriate for the home bar. I really like the Eamis Chair but wow, very pricey. I'm sure it's comfortable but I would get nervous sitting in it out of fear of breaking it.

I think I would prefer something along the lines of Archie Bunker's chair. :lol:

There is a Lazy Boy shop by me and I believe they are having a huge sale. Will stop by to test out some of the models but also wanted to hear opinions from the folks here on SB.

Thanks in advance.

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Richnimrod

Just my own personal experience; but here goes.

Having owned three 'Lazy Boy' chairs, and three 'off-brand' ones from various other sources over the years, I've never found the Lazy Boy brand to be superior, in fact, one of the three seemed inferior by comparison.

None of three off-brand ones was fabulous or special, but all seemed mechanically sound, and two of the three had quite durable fabric. One of the Lazy Boy chairs had mechanical issues almost from day one. Another had very 'UN-durable' upholstery.... An, each of the LB chairs was more expensive, even on sale (which is practically the only way I'll ever buy furniture). I think one off-brand was 'Flexsteel', and that was probably the best one of all. One of the others was Montgomery Ward house brand.... now defunct, of course. The third was sold at a discount house. I don't know the brand; but it performed as well as any other; but the fabric wasn't very durable. So.... There you go.

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johnnybogey
Just my own personal experience; but here goes.

Having owned three 'Lazy Boy' chairs, and three 'off-brand' ones from various other sources over the years, I've never found the Lazy Boy brand to be superior, in fact, one of the three seemed inferior by comparison.

None of three off-brand ones was fabulous or special, but all seemed mechanically sound, and two of the three had quite durable fabric. One of the Lazy Boy chairs had mechanical issues almost from day one. Another had very 'UN-durable' upholstery.... An, each of the LB chairs was more expensive, even on sale (which is practically the only way I'll ever buy furniture). I think one off-brand was 'Flexsteel', and that was probably the best one of all. One of the others was Montgomery Ward house brand.... now defunct, of course. The third was sold at a discount house. I don't know the brand; but it performed as well as any other; but the fabric wasn't very durable. So.... There you go.

Rich, thanks for your valuable feedback. This is all new to me and Lazy Boy was the first name that popped in my head.

I guess this is one of those situations where you have to try and many as possible. The hunt begins.

Thanks again for the insight.

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Paddy

I'll second the Flexsteel recommendation. I've got their products (chair, recliner, ottoman and couch) in leather. All are comfortable, well made, durable AND expensive.

As I don't plan on buying furniture on a regular basis, I consider it money well spent.:grin:

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petrel800

I'm assuming that frig vents heat out of the back, did you build in enough space for proper ventilation?

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johnnybogey
I'm assuming that frig vents heat out of the back, did you build in enough space for proper ventilation?

From what ive read online, a minimum of two inches is needed for proper ventilation. But two inches seems way too little.

I would say say there is about 4-5 inches gap. Do you think that is enough?

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kjbeggs

In defense of Lazy Boy, I had one of their recliners a few years ago and my dog (a pup at the time) chewed up the lever.

I went to one of their showrooms and ordered a replacement. When I got there to pick it up, there was no charge.

They said it was covered under he lifetime warranty...

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Harry in WashDC
From what ive read online, a minimum of two inches is needed for proper ventilation. But two inches seems way too little.

I would say say there is about 4-5 inches gap. Do you think that is enough?

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johnnybogey
(A little late in responding, but I was doing taxes so . . .)

If the unit is designed to be "built in", that is, it's clearly designed and labeled for under-counter installation, and if the mfr says two inches is enough, likely it is enough. I'm guessing that, if it is for built-in use, the installation book means a two inch gap all cross the top (like, if the unit is 20" wide, you'd have 2X20 = 40 sq. inches of unblocked space between the top of the unit and the bottom of any shelf above it). BUT, be sure to avoid the fatal attraction of sliding books, menus, utensils, canisters, etc., in there (or do what I did and get the silent treatment for a week for telling her she just can't put stuff in there). If it's NOT designed to be built in, then you can call/email the mfr and ask if "two inches" means on top AND the two sides OR just the top (OR just one side/just the top - pick one). I cannot imagine their ignoring your question. Well, I can imagine it, but . . .

Harry. No worries at all. Thoughts and comments always appreciated. The project had been on hold for the past two weeks. Swamped at work trying get our audit finished up and tax returns filed.

i am going to take a look at the owners manual for recommended gaps for built in. Not sure if it will provide as this is basically a large dorm refrigerator.

Thanks again Harry.

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johnnybogey
(A little late in responding, but I was doing taxes so . . .)

If the unit is designed to be "built in", that is, it's clearly designed and labeled for under-counter installation, and if the mfr says two inches is enough, likely it is enough. I'm guessing that, if it is for built-in use, the installation book means a two inch gap all cross the top (like, if the unit is 20" wide, you'd have 2X20 = 40 sq. inches of unblocked space between the top of the unit and the bottom of any shelf above it). BUT, be sure to avoid the fatal attraction of sliding books, menus, utensils, canisters, etc., in there (or do what I did and get the silent treatment for a week for telling her she just can't put stuff in there). If it's NOT designed to be built in, then you can call/email the mfr and ask if "two inches" means on top AND the two sides OR just the top (OR just one side/just the top - pick one). I cannot imagine their ignoring your question. Well, I can imagine it, but . . .

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tanstaafl2

I suspect that is providing an abundance of clearance to cover themselves. You appear to have plenty of space over the top and I would guess a good bit of space behind (at least the 5" suggested?) with a little on the sides so there is a fair chance you won't burn the house down... :cool:

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johnnybogey
I suspect that is providing an abundance of clearance to cover themselves. You appear to have plenty of space over the top and I would guess a good bit of space behind (at least the 5" suggested?) with a little on the sides so there is a fair chance you won't burn the house down... :cool:

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Harry in WashDC

What the free lunch guy said, plus a top gap in the back is a good idea - is a good way for "excess" heat to escape. Because the cooling coils on a fridge/freezer/heatpump/etc. are for heat exchanging, and because hot air rises (just watch the air around me hahaha), a slight bit of natural convection would be created. As tanstaafl2 asked, is there enough front-to-back space to allow, say, 5 inches between the wall and the back of the unit? The idea here is to avoid trapping hot air back there.

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