Jump to content

How Do You Make Your Favorite - Sazerac Cocktail ???


johnnyflake45
This topic has been inactive for at least 365 days, and is now closed. Please feel free to start a new thread on the subject! 

Recommended Posts

johnnyflake45

I have never had a Sazerac Cocktail in a bar or a restaurant, etc., so I have no idea about how a good one should taste. I know, I know, the type of Rye will make a difference and so on.

Therefore, I have decided to ask you guys, how you make your favorite Sazerac Cocktail. What's your favorite formula?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rinse a rocks glass with Absinthe and put in the freezer.

1tsp Gomme Syrup

5 dashes Pychauds Bitters

Muddle/mix add ice

3oz of Rye Whiskey (I tend to go 100 proof or higher MGP rye or WT 101)

Stir and then strain into the rocks glass from the freezer.

Add a lemon twist if I'm feeling fancy.

That's my version . . .

Link to post
Share on other sites
johnnyflake45
Rinse a rocks glass with Absinthe and put in the freezer.

1tsp Gomme Syrup

5 dashes Pychauds Bitters

Muddle/mix add ice

3oz of Rye Whiskey (I tend to go 100 proof or higher MGP rye or WT 101)

Stir and then strain into the rocks glass from the freezer.

Add a lemon twist if I'm feeling fancy.

That's my version . . .

Thanks!

Can a decent Sazerac be made without adding the Syrup or sugar? A few friends are type 2 diabetics and will have an occasional cocktail. It would be great if the sugar or syrup could be left out and still have a decent cocktail.

Link to post
Share on other sites
BonVivant84
Thanks!

Can a decent Sazerac be made without adding the Syrup or sugar? A few friends are type 2 diabetics and will have an occasional cocktail. It would be great if the sugar or syrup could be left out and still have a decent cocktail.

Not really as it will throw the whole balance of the drink off and will be overly bitter. I think Splenda is ok for some diabetics (but def confirm with your friends first!) and if thats the case i would go with making a simple syurp with that (1:1 ratio) - and you really only use 1/4 oz usually.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks!

Can a decent Sazerac be made without adding the Syrup or sugar? A few friends are type 2 diabetics and will have an occasional cocktail. It would be great if the sugar or syrup could be left out and still have a decent cocktail.

I suppose you could try. I've read that Agave nectar may be a good substitute for diabetics because it processes differently (Dad is a type 2), that being said, I'm not a doctor, so you'll have to do the research on it. Maybe try to make a simple syrup with a sugar substitute as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the most basic recipe from this site: http://sazerac.com/cocktail.aspx

My only change is that I use Rittenhouse BIB, and instead of cooling the glass by filling it with ice, I cool it in the freezer for a bit.

A simple and straight to the point Sazerac.

Link to post
Share on other sites
BourbonJoe
I use the most basic recipe from this site: http://sazerac.com/cocktail.aspx

My only change is that I use Rittenhouse BIB, and instead of cooling the glass by filling it with ice, I cool it in the freezer for a bit.

A simple and straight to the point Sazerac.

I mostly follow the recipe but I substitute real absinthe for the herbsaint.

Link to post
Share on other sites
johnnyflake45
I mostly follow the recipe but I substitute real absinthe for the herbsaint.

I have seen many recipes that say to rinse the glass with absinthe and pour out the excess and I have seen a couple that just add absinthe. Which is better and why?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have seen many recipes that say to rinse the glass with absinthe and pour out the excess and I have seen a couple that just add absinthe. Which is better and why?

As far as taste, both ways can get the same results. You just want the absinthe influence on the taste. Since you've got a bottle of rye and a bottle of absinthe, experiment around until you get the taste you like. Dive in the experiment pool. Sazerac is a fine drink. Last November I spent a few days in New Orleans and made it a point to try Sazeracs from as many bars as possible. Good experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
tanstaafl2
I have seen many recipes that say to rinse the glass with absinthe and pour out the excess and I have seen a couple that just add absinthe. Which is better and why?

I really only want a hint of absinthe/herbsainte in the glass and it can quickly overwhelm a drink if you add to much. I prefer the traditional method of coating the glass with absinthe and then pouring the excess out (into my mouth usually!). To save time I have occasionally add a drop or two using an eye dropper directly to the drink. Another good way to do it is get an atomizer and lightly spray the glass with the absinthe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
...Last November I spent a few days in New Orleans and made it a point to try Sazeracs from as many bars as possible. Good experience.

Nice! the sazerac bar was on that list i presume? lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice! the sazerac bar was on that list i presume? lol

It was, but the two best Sazerac's I had (remember: there is no accounting for taste) were at Arnaud's French 75 Bar and Brightsen's. One can drop a lot of coin at NO bars.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Like that atomizer idea for coating the glass, since I usually end up spilling when trying to get it well coated.

I've had Sazeracs in bars made with Rye, and with Cognac. Recently I made a couple at home using a 60/40 Rye- Cognac split.

Also, I usually express the lemon oil over the drink, then discard the peel.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Young Blacksmith

I've tried the coat the glass thing with absinthe, now I just splash a little in before adding the rye. Less change of spilling, especially as you progress through the evening.

I usually use Sazerac rye, mostly because Rittenhouse is hard to find out here. I also find I prefer the Absente brand absinthe over the Grand Absinthe. Stuff's expensive though!

Edited by Young Blacksmith
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
It was, but the two best Sazerac's I had (remember: there is no accounting for taste) were at Arnaud's French 75 Bar and Brightsen's. One can drop a lot of coin at NO bars.

I just finished a similar tour this past weekend and my favorite was at the Carousel bar at the Hotel Monteleone. In addition I was thrilled to sit and talk to Chris McMillian at Kingfish who shared with me that Herbsaint is an anagram of Absinthe, it all makes sense now

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't fuss making my Sazeracs. A shot of rye, a tiny splash of Herbsaint, Peychaud's, and ice. To me, they are as good as the ones from the bars and restaurants in New Orleans. Although I did have an exceptional one at K Paul's Kitchen, once.

TBH, I don't fuss much over any of my cocktails.

Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to be more fussy with my sazeracs than most cocktails I make, my regiment is usually:

Two rocks glasses, one filled with crushed ice

To the empty glass i add a cube of sugar, 2.5 oz of good high proof bourbon or rye (usually bookers or Rit101 - depending on my mood)

3 dashes peychauds

Muddle with a bar spoon untill sugar dissolved

Add ice from other glass, stir well about 30 seconds

Leave to rest and atomize absinthe into the chilled glass, i use pernod

Strain cocktail into chilled glass

Depending on my mood i will sometimes twist a bit of lemon peel over the glass to express some essence, never do i flame the peel, drop it in the drink or rub it on the rim. Usually use a high walled and straight rocks glass.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I just finished a similar tour this past weekend and my favorite was at the Carousel bar at the Hotel Monteleone. In addition I was thrilled to sit and talk to Chris McMillian at Kingfish who shared with me that Herbsaint is an anagram of Absinthe, it all makes sense now

A rather loose anagram to be sure since Absinthe is missing an "R"!

Link to post
Share on other sites
A rather loose anagram to be sure since Absinthe is missing an "R"!

Wow, after a couple juleps I didn't even think twice, good point

Link to post
Share on other sites

Was shopping with the wife yesterday and picked up what was being sold as an Olive oil atomizer for half-price ($5.00).

Used it last night to coat my chilled Saz glass with Corsair Red Absinthe, into which I poured:

2 oz Sazerac Rye (Baby Saz)

1 oz Remy Martin 1783 cognac

3/4 oz Demerara simple syrup

5 Dashes Peychaud's

(All stirred in an ice filled cocktail glass)

After transferring to the prepared glass, expressed the oil of a lemon peel over the top.

Super tasty. Hit the spot after yesterday's disappointment from UPS.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Thanks!

Can a decent Sazerac be made without adding the Syrup or sugar? A few friends are type 2 diabetics and will have an occasional cocktail. It would be great if the sugar or syrup could be left out and still have a decent cocktail.

Johnny,

I know a lot of folks disagree, but I make my Sazerac without sugar (or a sugar substitute). I know it's not traditional, but I enjoy it a lot. This might just be my quirky preference, I usually don't like shaken cocktails, or most beverages with added sugar (I drink coffee black). But you might want to give it a try. Look if you like the rye alone, and since the Peyschaud's bitters have a sweet element backing the bitter, I find it works for me.

Also, my absinthe addition process is to coat and then leave upside down on a paper towel as I stir the rye and bitters with ice. I find it's pretty consistent and guarantees not to overwhelm the drink. Hope you enjoy experimenting with the different suggestions here.

Bill

Link to post
Share on other sites
johnnyflake45
Johnny,

I know a lot of folks disagree, but I make my Sazerac without sugar (or a sugar substitute). I know it's not traditional, but I enjoy it a lot. This might just be my quirky preference, I usually don't like shaken cocktails, or most beverages with added sugar (I drink coffee black). But you might want to give it a try. Look if you like the rye alone, and since the Peyschaud's bitters have a sweet element backing the bitter, I find it works for me.

Also, my absinthe addition process is to coat and then leave upside down on a paper towel as I stir the rye and bitters with ice. I find it's pretty consistent and guarantees not to overwhelm the drink. Hope you enjoy experimenting with the different suggestions here.

Bill

Thanks for your thoughts. I have been experimenting a lot, using different Ryes. So far my favorite is 5 drops of Peychauds Bitters, 10 drops of St George Absinth, with a 2oz pour of Rittenhouse. No sugar or sweetener of any kind. Using Bulleit or Dickel would be my second favorite.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for your thoughts. I have been experimenting a lot, using different Ryes. So far my favorite is 5 drops of Peychauds Bitters, 10 drops of St George Absinth, with a 2oz pour of Rittenhouse. No sugar or sweetener of any kind. Using Bulleit or Dickel would be my second favorite.

Sounds great, and right up my alley. I'll keep an eye out for the St. Geo. Abs. thanks for the recommendation. Have you tried a twist of lemon with that recipe,if so what are your thoughts?

Link to post
Share on other sites
johnnyflake45
Sounds great, and right up my alley. I'll keep an eye out for the St. Geo. Abs. thanks for the recommendation. Have you tried a twist of lemon with that recipe,if so what are your thoughts?

I have not tried a twist of lemon, but I'll keep that thought and try it soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

In the mixing glass:

About 1 tsp simple syrup. (I use 1:1 demarara)

5 shakes Peychaud's

2 oz rye (I really like RR 6 yr small batch)

Stirred with ice and strained into a chilled rocks glass that's been rinsed with absinthe. Express and discard a lemon zest and sit back and relax.

 

I like to use some smallish rocks glasses so they don't look like someone sipped half my drink. And I use Lucid absinthe.

I'll also, from time to time, use a cognac for the base spirit. Usually that's Remy VSOP, for what it's worth.

 

 

 

Edited by Midwest101
Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.