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smokinjoe

What are you having for Cocktail Hour? Fall/Winter 2015

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Golzee
12 minutes ago, Harry in WashDC said:

Oh, yeah.  Thanks for the bump on the MFMiaW.  I made one back then and then made another one or more then went to sleep and promptly forgot.  THIS time, I wrote it down and will put it in our cocktail book.

Tonight we each had a Yellow Daisy.  Attributed to Richard William Clark, a cowboy known as Dead Eye Dick, our variation came from Jason Wilson's 2011 booze column in the Washington Post who wrote that he took it from "The Savoy Cocktail Book" (1930).  I have that book but never checked.  Variations call for an absinthe wash, orange bitters, particular gins, etc.  I just keep it simple.

One serving takes --

1.5 oz. gin (I used Leopold's Navy Strength as it finished off the bottle so now I can buy another Leopold's NSG)

0.75 dry vermouth (I used M&R in order to finish the bottle)

0.5 oz. Grand Marnier (which finished off the bottle)

Chill a martini glasss.  Put the ingredients in a mixing glass, add ice, and stir a lot.  Shaking tends to make it too watery, so stir.  Strain into the martini glass.

This recipe scales up nicely - just multiply the ingredients and glasses by the number of drinks you want to make.

Sounds tasty, and I have the technology!

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Darwin
5 hours ago, Harry in WashDC said:

Get some Everclear and make yourself some limoncello.  It lasts forever and is wonderful as the substitute additive to myriad cocktails that call for "lemon juice and simple syrup".

BUT, like a whole ham being eaten by two people, when I say it lasts forever, I mean FOREVER.

Good idea Harry.  I have had some in the past that I enjoyed, I wish I knew the brand.  I bought a bottle that was recommended by a staff member of a big chain store, it tasted like DuPont made it.  Your suggestion will give me something to search for tonight.  Thanks.  ;)

 

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smokinjoe
10 minutes ago, Darwin said:

...it tasted like DuPont made it.  

 

Heehee!  :lol:

Well done!

 

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Guest

Girlfriend said she wanted "something like a sidecar" so I concocted this guy which ended up pleasing her greatly, think Il make one for myself too! Probably without the sugar syrup and with more armagnac.

1.5oz delord xo

0.5oz cointreau

0.5oz amaro montenegro

1oz fresh lemon juice

0.5oz simple syrup

shaken and strained into a coupe.

 

Edited by onemorepour

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tanstaafl2
17 hours ago, Harry in WashDC said:

Oh, yeah.  Thanks for the bump on the MFMiaW.  I made one back then and then made another one or more then went to sleep and promptly forgot.  THIS time, I wrote it down and will put it in our cocktail book.

Tonight we each had a Yellow Daisy.  Attributed to Richard William Clark, a cowboy known as Dead Eye Dick, our variation came from Jason Wilson's 2011 booze column in the Washington Post who wrote that he took it from "The Savoy Cocktail Book" (1930).  I have that book but never checked.  Variations call for an absinthe wash, orange bitters, particular gins, etc.  I just keep it simple.

One serving takes --

1.5 oz. gin (I used Leopold's Navy Strength as it finished off the bottle so now I can buy another Leopold's NSG)

0.75 dry vermouth (I used M&R in order to finish the bottle)

0.5 oz. Grand Marnier (which finished off the bottle)

Chill a martini glasss.  Put the ingredients in a mixing glass, add ice, and stir a lot.  Shaking tends to make it too watery, so stir.  Strain into the martini glass.

This recipe scales up nicely - just multiply the ingredients and glasses by the number of drinks you want to make.

The Yellow Daisy is indeed in the Savoy Cocktail Book although the recipe is more generous with the vermouth as was often the case in those days.

1 to 1 gin to dry vermouth with .5 of Grand Marnier and a dash of absinthe in the Savoy book. Wilson was likely adjusting to accommodate the more "modern" palate for a boozier cocktail. I like to try them as written first and then adjust as needed.

This is also a bit different from the "Daisy" cocktail, which many people, including me, think is the most likely true source of the now far more popular Margarita. The Daisy was basically Brandy, Lemon juice and Curacao or triple sec. As people drifted south of the border to find their cocktail fix during prohibition it seems likely that tequila was substituted for brandy, lime juice for lemon juice and the Margarita (which of course means Daisy in Spanish) was born.

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smokinjoe

Whipped up an Old Crotchety Fashioned, but subbing CB Peat Monster for the bourbon.  Paired with an Oliva V cigar, it is absolute bliss...

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smokinjoe

A Perfect Manhattan with a Gurkha Royal Challenge Maduro out on the front porch soaking up some late afternoon Sun.  Not being a big sweet vermouth fan, I've tended to steer away from Manhattans.  But, I really like how the dry vermouth in the PM counters it.  This will now be how I do it.

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ratcheer

It's not really a cocktail, but I have been enjoying Americanos on these nice, Spring afternoons. Equal amounts of Carpano Antica Formula and Campari, ice, and a generous splash of club soda.

Tim

Edited by ratcheer
To correct typo

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tanstaafl2
28 minutes ago, ratcheer said:

It's not really a cocktail, but I have been enjoying Americanos on these nice, Spring afternoons. Equal amounts of Carpano Antica Formula and Campari, ice, and a generous splash of club soda.

Tim

The Americano is no less a cocktail than any other. Indeed, it is considered to be one of the "classic" cocktails in the International Bartenders Association Official Cocktails List and one that bartenders should be expected to make and make well as part of the annual IBA World Cocktail Competition.

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ratcheer

Ok, you win. It seems that the current definition of a cocktail is much more open to everything than the traditional definitions I prefer. E.g., "... any generic alcoholic mixed drink, cocktail may mean any beverage that contains three or more ingredients if at least one of them contain alcohol." - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocktail

We used to distinguish between cocktails, highballs, aperitifs, etc. I apologize for being old.

Tim

 

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ratcheer

Last night, the Braves were losing again, so I decided to make myself feel better. I made a Sazerac Cocktail using sugar, a few drops of water, Peychaud's bitters, a small splash of Herbsaint, and Wild Turkey 101.

 

Tim

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smokinjoe
6 hours ago, ratcheer said:

Last night, the Braves were losing again, so I decided to make myself feel better. I made a Sazerac Cocktail using sugar, a few drops of water, Peychaud's bitters, a small splash of Herbsaint, and Wild Turkey 101.

 

Tim

If that's your Braves Feel Better Go-To, You may want to consider investing in a couple of cases of WT, Tim...:(

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flahute

For the past week it's been Negronis every night while I was in Italy. One of the best ones was made by the hotel bartender in a small town called Castlefranco Veneto. In Venice, on a whim, we asked for a Boulevardier from the hotel bar and they had never heard of one. We told them to make a Negroni with Wild Turkey 81 (it was all they had) instead of gin. The waiter asked me to write down the name so he could remember it. The next day, he was good to go. It was pretty good. Late in the week, we also drank a lot of what they call a Spritz. It's a combo of prosecco, club soda, and Aperol. They also make one with Campari in place of the Aperol. It's incredibly tasty and refreshing on a hot day when you've walked 10+ miles, which we did a lot.

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