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New 14 Year Old Bottled in Bond Bourbon From MGP Is On Its Way

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Harry in WashDC
On 7/4/2019 at 6:35 AM, GaryT said:

Am I the only one who expects to see the mashbill disclosed in any article/topic that involves MGP?  When I read it, I thought "$200 is insane . . . which mashbill though?"  I'm definitely out, but just curious if anyone has heard.

 

I'm also confused as to why MGP distilled stuff aged somewhere else (like Smooth Ambler, etc) can be pretty damn tasty - but I've yet to try something produced directly from MGP that was as impressive.  They certainly know how to distill; seems odd to me that they wouldn't have some stocks of pretty damn good whiskey to bottle (and with their business, could bottle them at a price more competitively).

Excellent observation (primarily because it is self-evident BUT I had not thought about it :o).  I remember searching and finally finding Metze's Select at MSRP (which was upper market at the time - $70?) and liking it some but being disappointed.  LOTS of stuff @ $30 I liked a lot more (even relabeled MGP) so guess where my money for bottle #2 went?

 

I also love your suggestion on a series of MGP mashbill releases.  Just don't price it like the BTAC.

 

AND, on thread - Without my tasting the Volstead first, this is a pass for me.

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kcgumbohead
On 7/4/2019 at 9:17 PM, JoeTerp said:

Nailed it

Well, one mans trash... I certainly feel that way about certain profiles and I wouldn’t doubt it if they might be some of your favorites 😏. I happen to like the GD profile, I also like the MGP profile , good MGP as in MGP under someone else’s label. While I might like it or I might find it  “gross”  I won’t pay that much for  the privilege of finding out. I have other MGP bottles aquired for a much more palatable price.

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The Black Tot
On 7/4/2019 at 10:35 AM, GaryT said:

AI'm also confused as to why MGP distilled stuff aged somewhere else (like Smooth Ambler, etc) can be pretty damn tasty - but I've yet to try something produced directly from MGP that was as impressive.  They certainly know how to distill; seems odd to me that they wouldn't have some stocks of pretty damn good whiskey to bottle (and with their business, could bottle them at a price more competitively).

 

Because aging is an art and a skill in itself. Not telling you anything YOU don't know, Gary - but rackhouse construction and local microclimate are huge factors in whiskey development.

 

Willett and Smooth Ambler are great examples - they take other people's distillate and somehow seem to mature it with such skill, rackhouse structure, and great climate that they often end up smoking the source distillery's own efforts.

 

You've got to distill like a scientist, but then do your aging like an artist/traditionalist/educated guesser.

 

My suspicion is that MGP is so science-oriented (their main business is industrial chemicals from what I understand) that they do their aging like scientists, and are missing a few of the tricks that the old distillers know about rack houses and barrel management.

 

BT has a lot of science going on in the maturation department - I love science and think it's eventually going to figure out what the secrets are. But a lot of the experimental collection demonstrates that a good hypothesis doesn't often yield a great bourbon. But tradition and handed-down experience seems to be serving the Trace pretty well until they crack the code.

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The Black Tot

...also, +4.

 

I'd buy a 14 yr old MGP 100 proofer for $60 - if I heard it was good.

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GaryT
7 hours ago, The Black Tot said:

 

Because aging is an art and a skill in itself. Not telling you anything YOU don't know, Gary - but rackhouse construction and local microclimate are huge factors in whiskey development.

 

Willett and Smooth Ambler are great examples - they take other people's distillate and somehow seem to mature it with such skill, rackhouse structure, and great climate that they often end up smoking the source distillery's own efforts.

 

You've got to distill like a scientist, but then do your aging like an artist/traditionalist/educated guesser.

 

My suspicion is that MGP is so science-oriented (their main business is industrial chemicals from what I understand) that they do their aging like scientists, and are missing a few of the tricks that the old distillers know about rack houses and barrel management.

 

BT has a lot of science going on in the maturation department - I love science and think it's eventually going to figure out what the secrets are. But a lot of the experimental collection demonstrates that a good hypothesis doesn't often yield a great bourbon. But tradition and handed-down experience seems to be serving the Trace pretty well until they crack the code.

Well said Paul.  I was thinking about the micro-climate angle (I mean, some of HH's distillate aged across the street at Willett has been amazing!)  You're probably right about the science angle too.  Thinking about Beam, and creating Bookers, Bakers, Knob Creek, and Jim Beam all from the same mashbill - just based on age and aging location (both which rackhouse, and where within those rackhouses) - takes some learning over time about your product and how it develops.  I wonder if they just shoved some stuff into a rackhouse or three at some point, and just in the last few years have started seeing what they could pull and bottle.  With their capacity (understanding that much of their work is contract distilling), their cost should be similar to one of the other major Kentucky distillers.  Maybe they need to subcontract out the product development (and consider renting rackhouse space, although these days with them falling down, catching fire, etc - that's expensive I'd reckon).

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