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New Riff Winter Whiskey


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Now here's a strange one. I just came across this piece about it, link provided below.

The mashbill is:

65% corn

20% malted oats

7% pale ale malt

5% steel cut raw oats

3% chocolate malt

 

That's the strangest mashbill I've ever seen. The author says it's really good but would like to a couple more years on it. Right now it's BIB at 4yrs.

Has anyone tried this?

 

https://www.gobourbon.com/new-riff-winter-whiskey-2020-the-best-thing-we-drank-this-week/

 

(I have no connections to either the author or this website)

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PhantomLamb

If it wasn't overpriced I'd be interested to try it.  Reminds me of craft beer.

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41 minutes ago, PhantomLamb said:

If it wasn't overpriced I'd be interested to try it.  Reminds me of craft beer.

I think it sounds very interesting as well.   I give New Riff credit for innovation.   Maltster, Balboa Rye, Backsetter = continually changing their game.   I have had all three, and really enjoyed the Balboa and Maltster.   Did not care for the peat bomb backsetter products.   Just my .02

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Old Hippie

Gotta give props to the little guys who are going with thoughtful innovation rather than marketing/packaging gimmicks or high proof for the sake of high proof.

 

Would be interested to hear about this one from someone who has tried it. Not sure how you do a chocolate malt other than a milk shake machine. I guess maybe I should read the article.

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Chocolate malt is a type of malted barley used as an ingredient in brewing some dark beers, like stout.  I've used it before in home brewing.  It does not contain chocolate, but does impart a very similar taste and dark color.

 

The milkshake known as a "malt" is a milkshake with a spoon full or dash of powdered malt sugar added.

 

On the other side of the Atlantic, "malt" = single malt whisky.

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4 hours ago, PaulO said:

Chocolate malt is a type of malted barley used as an ingredient in brewing some dark beers, like stout.  I've used it before in home brewing.  It does not contain chocolate, but does impart a very similar taste and dark color.

 

The milkshake known as a "malt" is a milkshake with a spoon full or dash of powdered malt sugar added.

 

On the other side of the Atlantic, "malt" = single malt whisky.

Love coming here and going to school. 

Edited by CUfan99
typo
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My New Riff experience is very limited; multiple bottles of a single barrel bourbon, but I’m excited to try more. It’s surprising that NR invested so much time and money into these limited offerings when they were just starting and before they had sold anything. Certainly not the craft norm. 

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  • 1 month later...
Jazz June

To further expand, malting is a process that can be done to different cereal grains. The term "single malt" typically refers to malted barley, as single malt Scotch must be 100% malted barley, but malted grains are also used in the production of many other whiskeys. My understanding is that malted grain assists with fermentation. The U.S. standards of identity recognize malted rye as a distinct category from regular rye and there have been at least a few malted rye whiskeys released. I believe there was an Old Potrero "single malt" that was in fact 100% malted rye.

 

The chocolate terminology refers to the toasting of the malted grain, which gives a strong chocolate note. I did not care for the Woodford Reserve Master's Collection Chocolate Malted Rye, which was a bourbon containing 15% malted rye that had been toasted for that chocolate note. The effect on the flavor was much too strong for my taste, but I typically don't like chocolate stouts either. Here it looks like New Riff has "chocolate" toasted some malted barley and also used malted oats, an interesting mash bill to be sure. I assume "pale ale malt" is a brewer's malt, but not entirely sure. If the chocolate note was lessened from the Woodford and brought into a better balance with the other flavors, I could see this being good.

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On 2/18/2021 at 11:01 AM, Jazz June said:

To further expand, malting is a process that can be done to different cereal grains. The term "single malt" typically refers to malted barley, as single malt Scotch must be 100% malted barley, but malted grains are also used in the production of many other whiskeys. My understanding is that malted grain assists with fermentation. The U.S. standards of identity recognize malted rye as a distinct category from regular rye and there have been at least a few malted rye whiskeys released. I believe there was an Old Potrero "single malt" that was in fact 100% malted rye.

 

The chocolate terminology refers to the toasting of the malted grain, which gives a strong chocolate note. I did not care for the Woodford Reserve Master's Collection Chocolate Malted Rye, which was a bourbon containing 15% malted rye that had been toasted for that chocolate note. The effect on the flavor was much too strong for my taste, but I typically don't like chocolate stouts either. Here it looks like New Riff has "chocolate" toasted some malted barley and also used malted oats, an interesting mash bill to be sure. I assume "pale ale malt" is a brewer's malt, but not entirely sure. If the chocolate note was lessened from the Woodford and brought into a better balance with the other flavors, I could see this being good.

I too did not like the Woodford at all, gave it away in the end to a friend who liked it.   I'm with you.

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