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nysquire

Old Farmers Distillery

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nysquire

I am looking for info on "old Farmers Distillery". They made

a great 12 year 100 proof bourben that they bottled in 1964.

I am trying to find out more about this distillery if anybody has info. Are they still around (under another name?)where were they located in kentucky? They bottled private label bourben.

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OneCubeOnly

I don't know if this will help you or not, but I got one hit on Google which lists their incorporation as being in Delaware.

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nysquire

On the bottle it says: Old Farmers Distillery

Reg. Dist. No 20, Dist. of Kentucky

Straight Bourbon Whisky - 100 proof - Distilled in Kentucky

post-711-14489811722201_thumb.jpg

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OneCubeOnly

Maybe Chuck or one of the historians can shed more light for you. Would a Kentucky distillery incorporate in another state (maybe for tax purposes!?)

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dgonano

Gary,

Yes many large national corporations incorporate in Delaware since the annual franchise and other taxes are less. There are other benefits also.

That is why many corporate attorneys are found in Wilmington, De

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bobbyc

DSP 20 was Cummins Collins Distillery which is a few miles from BettyeJo's house and the remaining buildings are being used for a cooperage. There is also 2 references to DSP30 in Sam Cecils book, DSP30 General Distillers of Kentucky , that was connected to The Mellwood Distillery. DSP30 in Bourbon County, The Millersburg distillery and WM Davis &Co. It is listed as a failed venture in 1882.

BettyeJo made a nice post about the Atherton distillery some time ago. A search should turn it up.

He clearly states that General Distillers of Ky did bottle for Old Farmers. Seagrams was involved at some point. I would think that that is now a dead label or collecting dust in the cat and dog bin.

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cowdery

I don't know the Cummins Collins name, but the Atherton Distillery became Seagram's probably during WWII and they operated it until it was largely destroyed by fire in 1972. It never reopened as a distillery.

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bobbyc

It appears that the Atherton site was home to 5 or 6 distilleries or owners over the years. Cummins -Collins rebuilt there after prohibition and sold to Seagrams in 1946. He also says they alternately ran Atherton and H McKenna at Fairfield.

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nysquire

Thanks everybody for the info. Was that standard practice for a distillery to make bourbon and have someone else bottle it.I have to say I have drank a lot of different kinds of bourbons over the years, the boubon in this bottle is just outstanding.It sat in a cool dark area for 40 years and i am amazed.Really smooth, brown sugery/vanilla impact. I have ord'd cecil's book hopin to learn a little more.

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Gillman

Interesting, this is very close to how I recall the taste of Benchmark Bourbon in the 1970's, i.e., not long after its launch by Seagram. Probably every generation or so bourbons will (broadly speaking) resemble each other, and then they will change together through an evolutionary process that is hardly noticeable and too subtle to analyse with precision. Thus, when I did my mini-tasting recently of WT 101, Elmer Lee, Woodford Reserve and ORVW Lot B 12 years old, I was struck by how similar they were again in a general way. Probably this results from:

(i) the few makers extant of charred barrels;

(ii) the uniformity of much of the dry yeast, corn and malting barley available and of current designs of continuous stills;

(iii) converging production methods such as the slow but steady abandonment of cypress vessels in favour of stainless steel; and

(iv) probably numerous other, interracting, factors which together create the "zeitgeist" of bourbon today. In other words, people (or the current makers rather) expect straight whiskey to taste a certain way but this is also affected by slow changes over which they have no real control; inevitably, the collective result differs from the taste profile of yesteryear. Also, increasing consolidation in the industry tends to result in a greater uniformity of palate, in my opinion. Not that the current products don't differ but I am speaking "broad brush" again.

Gary

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nysquire

If the distillery was Cummins-Collins owned by seagrams, why or where does the old farmers distillery come into play?

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cowdery

Many--maybe most--whiskey companies use something called "DBA" names, which stands for "doing business as." DBA names are legal entities registered with the state as proxies for the real corporation. At one time, the distilleries would actually hang out a sign with the dba name on it when they were running the production for that proxy. In other words, "Old Farmers Distillery" is a dba.

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nysquire

Is there a way to find out who was the master distiller there from 51 thru 64? what about the actual recipe they used then, is another of thier distilleries making similiar bourbon.

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cowdery

About all I can suggest is that since Seagram's definitely had a house "style," you should look for something from another Seagram's distillery. Although Seagram's as a company is now gone, the Four Roses Distillery in Lawrenceburg is still very much committed to that Seagram's style, so try either standard Four Roses, Four Roses Single Barrel or Bulleit. Based on your description, I think the Four Roses Single Barrel might be nearest to what you remember.

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boone

This is venturing off just at tad but still within the subject...

On one of my lines (C-LINE) we run lots of different product, bourbon, vodka, rum, tequila, etc. etc. etc...At the case packer, there is a sign with our DSP#. This sign, is only on C-line because on a regular basis we will run wine on that line... The minute we "change" that line to run Wine...We flip the sign over...It has our BWC# on the other side grin.gif...

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

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nysquire

Thanks so much Bettye Jo for all of your help. If i can find a bourbon even so close to this one bottled in 1964 right next store to you, i'd probably buy a case of it. I as well look very forward to visiting your great rich in history area.(hopefully this february).

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nysquire

I am also wondering how I would get a bourbon barrel just after a great bourbon has been released from it. I would be using it for culinary purposes. I have a passion for smoked foods(RIBS....) as well and have developed a great dry rub trhat I put on the meat before it gets smoked. It has a great many spices in it and I would like to try adding a flavor I could only get from one of those barrels. It's worth a try anyways. Thanks again and look forward to trying some of that EWSB 95, if I can get my hands on it....

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nysquire

Also wondering about the status of Cummins-Collins, Atherton or ever what it was last, now that Seagrams is out of the picture. Does this great tradition and history go away or is it available to the next person wanting to keep a great tradition alive? Where does that DSP# go?........

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stoopsie

The Old Atherton Distillery is now a cooperage. They had a fire there recently, but I am not sure how badly it was damaged.

Howie

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boone

Barrels are a dime a dozen around here grin.gif

Most all of the distilleries sell their used cooperage.

The cheapest place to find them is at Keene's beverage Depot. They are located in Bardstown--(8 Bloomfield Pike), up hill from the Civil War Museum. The Civil War Museum is where they host the Sampler every year.

Last year a barrel cost $8. Now they are about $12...The price varies, and depends on the market and the availability.

A long time ago, HH used to have a big saw, in the back of the building. One of the jobs at HH was to cut the barrels into halves. They shipped them out to be sold as flower pots grin.gif They ceased this practice over a decade ago.

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

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brendaj

I am also wondering how I would get a bourbon barrel just after a great bourbon has been released from it. I would be using it for culinary purposes. I have a passion for smoked foods(RIBS....) as well and have developed a great dry rub trhat I put on the meat before it gets smoked.

Hey Jim,

Just saw your post. I have a passion for smoked food myself. Have a look at the bbq page on my site . Please overlook the missing stuff, it's still under construction (geez, how long have I been saying that now... rolleyes.gif).

The fresh barrels are pretty hard to find these days, but I have a buddy at the Barton warehouse. On occassion, they have broken barrels, and they're happy to give me the pieces.

I'll try to help you find some barrel pieces if you post the recipe for that rub... wink.gifyum.gif

Bj

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Gillman

Great Lakes Brewing News, current issue, has an ad at page 23 from Niagara Tradition Homebrew, a beer- and wine-making supplies outlet. NTH is offering a, "fall special: 50 gallon Kentucky Whiskey Barrels Select Grade, Used Once, $75 each". NTH is located on Sheridan Drive, Buffalo, NY, 1-800-283-4418, 716-877-8767.

Gary

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nysquire

Is there such records to who was the master distiller at the seagram's/atherton distillery from 1950 thru 1962? Is that info recorded anywhere? possibly cecil's book, which I have ord'd and have not gotten yet.....

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cowdery

It is not in Cecil's book. What you need to find are the annual compilations done for tax purposes of whiskey in bonded warehouses. Liberty Bank in Louisville, which no longer exists, of course, did them for many years. You might try contacting the Kentucky Distillers Association. I know these things are done every year, but I've never found a source that has all of them in one place. I have a few, odds and ends from various years, but don't think I have the years you are interested in. Anyway, it shows every company that has whiskey aging in warehouses and identifies the master distiller. I tried to see if the state government had them but struck out there. If the Getz were a real museum (don't get me started), that's the sort of thing they would have.

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boone

I know a man that worked there until the fire...After the fire, he got a job at Barton's...He lives within walking distance from the old Athertonville Distillery---now a cooperage.

I will see if Mr. Sims is home tomorrow. Maybe, he will have the answer to your question grin.gif

grin.gifgrin.gif Bettye Jo grin.gifgrin.gif

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