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TimmyBoston

Manhattan's

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ILLfarmboy
Not a fan of Manhattans made with Bourbon.

I prefer a good Old Fashion anyway..

I prefer Manhattans made with bourbon. In fact I should say I don't like Manhattans made with rye. But I like Old Fashioneds made with rye, Saz Jr. being my favorite. Although not my favorite sipped neat. Go figure.

A few weeks ago I ordered a WT 101 Manhattan in a nightclub, A nightclub that use to be a favorite of mine both for the knowledgeable staff as well as the live entertainment every Friday night. They now are under new management and most of the former waitstaff are gone. What I got was an abomination, no bitters and what I swear had to have been grenadine in place of sweet vermouth. I would have sent the drink back were it not for the fact my wife probably wouldn't have appreciated my making a scene with her boss and a couple of her coworkers present. So I kept my mouth shut, which was, for me, both difficult and uncharacteristic. I drank only about a third of the "cocktail", enough to be sociable and then made up something about wanting to take a Benadryl later before going to bed.

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CrispyCritter
On the topic of vermouth selection...has anyone tried Vya sweet vermouth? I've been looking all over for it. I'm wondering if Vya is worth the extra money and expense over, say, Pratt or Rossi.

Oh, my, yes. IMO, it is head and shoulders above anything other than Carpano Antica Formula. Vya sweet and Antica Formula are very different from one another, but I consider them to be peers from a quality standpoint.

Punt e Mes is closely related to Antica Formula, but has an extra bitter edge to it that works really well in some drinks, like the Red Hook.

I haven't tried the Vya dry vermouth - I use very little dry vermouth. If I find a 375 of it, I might give it a try, though, as I've certainly been impressed with their sweet vermouth.

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cowdery

The other night I had a French Manhattan, in which Chambord is substituted for the sweet vermouth. Over the weekend I had a Pama Manhattan, in which Pama pomegranate liqueur was substituted for the vermouth. I liked both of them, though in both cases the bartender needed to have a lighter hand with the vermouth-substitute. I specifically requested bitters in the Pama one. The Chambord one was mixed up in a batch and I don't think it contained any bitters.

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Aged In Oak

Inspired by this thread, I've been playing around with Manhattans this past week. I've been experimenting with different whiskies to see what suits my tastes best... so far I think WT and BT are the best bourbons I've tried. I didn't care for Blanton's... the flavor didn't seem to blend with the vermouth very well. I also tried Sazerac rye, which was decent, but seemed to be missing something compared to the bourbon-based variants. Might have to try altering the ingredient ratios a bit to see if I can get a better fit. Still want to try a broader variety of ryes, as well a Canadian or two as some have suggested. Guess I'll have to make another trip to the liquor store... darn! :grin:

Andy

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pepcycle

Time to Bump this Thread.

I just read this in the Lexington Herald Leader and decicded to make a round (or two) with the new WT Russell's Rye. Very Nice. I'm only going to infuse for 8hrs. (I'm not that big a clove fan)

Michael Flynn, wine and beverage director at Dallas' revamped Mansion on Turtle Creek restaurant, came up with this variation on a New York classic. You'll be humming Silver Bells to yourself before you've finished mixing the first batch.

Manhattan holiday

1 orange, halved

2 tablespoons whole cloves

1 cinnamon stick

10 ounces bourbon

2 ounces sweet vermouth

Bing cherries and cinnamon sticks for garnish

Stud orange halves with cloves.

Place the clove-studded orange halves and cinnamon stick in a medium-size glass container. Fill the container with bourbon.

Cover and allow mixture to infuse at room temperature for at least 48 hours.

When ready to serve, fill shaker half full with cubed ice. Strain and pour bourbon mixture into shaker.

Add sweet vermouth to shaker. Shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Strain and pour mixture into four chilled martini glasses.

Garnish each drink with a cherry and a cinnamon stick. Serves 4.

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HipFlask

Straight Rye makes the best Manhatten's. I go with Rittenhouse BIB as the numero uno. 2 oz of whiskey to 1 oz sweet vermouth. a couple of dashes of bitters and a marschino cherry. 2 tips for you one is to chill the martini glass with ice before you prepare the drink in the shaker. The other is to shake it for no less than 5 seconds. Strain it into your chilled glass and you are good to go. If you want to make a perfect Manhattan use 1/2 a oz of sweet vermouth and 1/2 a oz of dry vermouth. A dry manhattan is 1 oz of dry vermouth. Enjoy.

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tommyboy38

Just recently decided to try my hand at a few Manhattans and I think i found my recipe off the back of a vermouth bottle. Made them 2:1 bourbon to M&R vermouth but no bitters. i think I'll pick somem bitters up when I get a new bottle of vermouth. Used EW black mostly but did try some EWSB which kinda sucked in my opinion. The black made a much better manhattan.

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rockporter

Here is another version called a Moto Gucci

Equal parts bourbon and Punt e mes (an Italian vermouth which is dark brown in colour and has a bitter flavor)

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StraightBoston

Bitters are key -- Angostura (easy to find with the yellow cap) will do just fine.

Purists will tell you that by definition a "cocktail" must include bitters... I find that they tie the drink together into something better than the parts.

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JeffRenner
Purists will tell you that by definition a "cocktail" must include bitters... I find that they tie the drink together into something better than the parts.

Amen, Brother! Preach it!

Here is what Gary and Mardee Regan say on the subject on p. 271 of their 1995 The Book of Bourbon:

"Without any bitters at all, a Manhattan is no more than a decent mixture; with them, it is a dazzling cocktail that will bring a sparkle to the eyes and put a slick step back into a pair of tired dancing feet."

Jeff

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