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Cincinnati Chili


Gillman
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The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

Gary

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I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I only lived in Cincinnati for a brief time (6 mos.) but fell in love with the city and never pass an opportunity to visit. Vine street has some nice music venues and record shops. But Skyline chili is a godsend. I love it on a dog piled high with shredded cheese and a splash of their own hot sauce. I was pleasantly surprised to find one in Loiusville. And walking across that bridge into KY is kinda funny in that the first thing you notice is the large neon signs simply advertising "Whisky!"

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Gillman viewpost.gif

I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.

I don't know what a wiener shnitzel is but I can testify to the fact tenderloin sandwiches are nothing to write home about. It's hard to believe they are actually made from the tenderloin because they are not tender. They're beaten very flat with a tenderizing mallet, usually breaded, deep fat fried and served on a bun.

A hundred times better is butterfly pork chop sandwich. Especially when cooked outside on a grill. (outdoor festivals and such)

For something Midwestern try a made-rite; a loose hamburger sandwich made with "made-rite sauce" served on a bun. Moist, greasy, messy and very tasty. We have "made-rite" restaurants, it's their signature item.

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I was raised in a large family. We had a huge garden...Seemed as if it were 10 acres :( I spent a lot of time in the garden during the summer breaks, of my youth...It seemed as if the rest of my free time was spent canning tomatoes, snappin' green beans, and shuckin' corn. I swore that when, "I got big", I ain't never gonna have a garden...I'll buy this stuff...

I kept true to the promise...I hate gardening...always have and guess I always will.

Anyway, back to th original post. We always killed hogs the first cold weekend in November...The best part (really there isn't) was on the first supper after the hangin'...Daddy would cook us tenderloin sandwitches...The prime cut was from there and I will admit, it's the best.

I ain't a farm girl...never claimed to be...never wanted to be but simply stuck into the "lifestyle" from being in a large family.

This has nothing to do with Chili...so any further discussion might be moved to "new thread" about tenderloin :grin: ...

Bettye Jo

The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

Gary

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Thanks all. We can do a new thread, but I've learned a lot. I thought tenderloin sandwiches are the same as the butterflied sandwich mentioned, so I see now these are two different things.

I never heard of the made-rite sandwich, I like that, want to try that too.

In Ontario we don't have many local foods or preparations but one that most people know is the peameal bacon sandwich. This is the cured but not smoked pork loin, cut in thick slices, coated (whole before the slicing) in yellow corn meal (nothing to do with peas, maybe yellow pea meal was used originally), fried, and piled on a kaiser roll. It is very good with a little mustard or ketchup and some people specify a dusting of black pepper. You can add tomato slices and lettuce. Traditionally though it is eaten plain. I've tried it on different breads but for some reason only a kaiser roll will do.

The Mennonite summer sausage sandwiches from southwestern Ontario are very good and here, I've seen (in their native area) most people eat them on plain white bread, the Wonderloaf-type. And strangely, it tastes really good that way. But the summer sausage has a lot of salt and I find it hard to take that as I get older. The peameal, being commercially cured and kept cold until sold or prepared, is not too salty at all.

Gary

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This is the first I've heard of Maid-Rite Sandwiches, even though they seem to be in this basic region. Since I love this sort of thing (regional cuisines, that is) I did some research and found the Maid-Rite Web Site.

Apparently, Gary, their menu includes tenderloin sandwiches.

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Thanks much that looks great. This is an operation with long roots (i.e., one of the older, smaller franchises like White Castle - I like that one too) and is no retro invention, I love the pictures of the store and counter from the 1930's. Even if (as inevitably) new locations are just copies of the original, at least there was an original! And they are using the same recipe for their signature dish. In fact, their whole menu has a 1930's feel to it. I am on a loose sandwich quest, friends...

Gary

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Some may be interested (or not) in my interest in such plain Jane regional fare. It has to do less with how the food actually tastes - although often the food is justification enough - and more to do with the fact that it is real and comes from real places. (So does more elegant fare, which is as valid, just different). One time I read in a biography of (famed American novelist) Jack Kerouac that he first met his first wife, Edie Parker, in a luncheonette in Manhattan. And what drew Edie Parker to Jack's attention, he later said, was that she ate one after the other four hot dogs covered with sauerkraut! He loved that and it made him love her. Kerouac had a tendency to exaggerate in the later years, but the marriage didn't last too long, so probably he was more right than wrong in the recollection. To me that story is all about luncheonettes and being young and America, really.

Gary

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CrispyCritter
This is the first I've heard of Maid-Rite Sandwiches, even though they seem to be in this basic region. Since I love this sort of thing (regional cuisines, that is) I did some research and found the Maid-Rite Web Site.

Indeed, they're mostly in Iowa and western Illinois (e.g. Quincy and the Quad Cities area). There are a few in Ohio as well, but it seems that they skipped the Chicago area completely.

Another out-of-place regional franchise that I've seen is the Wienerschnitzel (a California chain of hot-dog stands) in Champaign, Illinois. Their hot dogs were OK, but I'd take a Chicago dog over theirs any day.

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  • 7 months later...

Camp Washington Chili is my personal favorite. "American Regional Classic" James Beard Award, CBS News 1985 "the best chili in the nation". Blues musician Lonnie Mack sings a song entitled "Camp Washington Chili".[

Open 24 hours, its relation to bourbon is pehaps best decribed as an "after the bars close" destination. Any similarities to Mexican mole dishes are purely coincidental.

Cheap, watery, greasy, and VERY good.

Robert

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Open 24 hours, its relation to bourbon is pehaps best decribed as...Robert

... "better than the dry heaves".

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