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Classic Cask rye question


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Specifically, CC 21 rye. Who makes it and who distributes it?

Any info is appreciated. Thanks.

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From what little I've seen recently it looked to me like the Malt Whisky Society has a hand in its distribution.

And from what I heard, it's from the same source that Tim referenced for the current BMH bottles.

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Classic Cask is an independent bottler brand. They started out with scotch and started to do American whiskey maybe ten years ago. I think they're a marketing company, not actually a bottler, and since the folks producing this sort of thing have dwindled, it pretty much has to be sourced from KBD or HH. HH, of course, uses their own whiskey. KBD uses whiskey it acquires, often but not always from Heaven Hill.

I have it from pretty good sources that all of the old rye in the marketplace right now, except the Rittenhouse 21, is coming from KBD and is whiskey distilled at Bernheim in Louisville by UDV, ostensibly for the Cream of Kentucky brand.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Their rye is a KBD distilled rye. I spoke with the Sales and Marketing Administrator and confirmed that with them.

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Their rye is a KBD distilled rye. I spoke with the Sales and Marketing Administrator and confirmed that with them.
If that is what the Admin said, I wonder how accurate the terminology "KBD distilled rye", is.

My understanding was that KBD currently owns and sells the whiskey that is bottled as Classic Cask, but KBD is not the original maker / distiller of the said whiskey.

:confused:

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Oh I guess she did say that the rye resides at KBD, I assumed it was distilled there. I can dig deeper.

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Oh I guess she did say that the rye resides at KBD, I assumed it was distilled there. I can dig deeper.
Definitely not pushing you to do anything you don't already intend to - with this.

I think the path has been traveled several times in the past and don't expect we'll find out a definitive answer as to specifically who made the orginal whiskey (although the choices seem to be fairly limited thanks to details Chuck and a few others have mined).

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Oh I guess she did say that the rye resides at KBD, I assumed it was distilled there. I can dig deeper.

There has been no distilling at the KBD site since c. 1982 when it was the Willett Distillery. The Kulsveens have installed a new still at the site, but are not yet in operation (unless fired up very recently).

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Shades of the book, Eats, Shoots and Leaves!

With slight variations in punctuation, the speaker may have meant (or meant to conceal) either of the following: "KBD-distilled rye" or "KBD, distilled rye".

The former would imply that KBD distilled it; the latter merely says that it bears the mark of KBD and is distilled. If the expression "rye whiskey" had been used, then the word "distilled" would have been superfluous. In that case one might argue that the omission of the hyphen was merely a matter of style.

Could it be that someone with my bent for nit-picking had a hand in coming up with this description? Or is it just happenstance?

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

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Shades of the book, Eats, Shoots and Leaves!

With slight variations in punctuation, the speaker may have meant (or meant to conceal) either of the following: "KBD-distilled rye" or "KBD, distilled rye".

The former would imply that KBD distilled it; the latter merely says that it bears the mark of KBD and is distilled. If the expression "rye whiskey" had been used, then the word "distilled" would have been superfluous. In that case one might argue that the omission of the hyphen was merely a matter of style.

Could it be that someone with my bent for nit-picking had a hand in coming up with this description? Or is it just happenstance?

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

While I'm not an expert, I would say that you're a veritable cornucopia of vernacularity!:slappin:

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