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cowdery

I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

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cowdery
I know this is getting off subject and for that I apologize. But I'm curious, when American authors are published in the UK and vice versa is it common practice to change the spelling?

Absolutely. Every piece I write for WHISKY Magazine is so edited (and I'm talking about words other than whiskey) and Lew Bryson, Managing Editor of Malt Advocate, mentioned to me over the weekend that he does the same for everything they publish by Stephen Beaumont.

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cowdery
I agree that "whiskey" and "whisky" are the same thing: distilled grains aged in wood.

What is the argument presented by those who say they are different things?

Further, I consider the Dickel and Maker's Mark use of the latter to be an affectation. Dickel calls themselves a "Tennessee Whiskey" even though they spell it without the "e" on the label.

I guess not so much arguments as just crazy beliefs. Here's just one example. I read someone who stated that Jack Daniel's was required to use the "whisky" spelling because the "whiskey" spelling was only allowed for bourbon.

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cowdery

In the post above, I meant to say George Dickel. Jack Daniel's spells it the right way.

The other American brands that use "whisky" are Early Times and Maker's Mark.

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Gillman

And Old Forester.

Gary

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mier

Why not go back to the origin and call it UISCE?:grin: .

Eric.

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Rughi
Here's my take on the debate Chuck started. I'd love to hear anyone else's comments:

Kevin Erskine is right on all counts.

But when in doubt or speaking generically, I'll use the "e", 'cause I'm a 'Merican (not a Mercian).

Roger

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Edward_call_me_Ed

I have always tried to use the spelling appropriate to the region. However, I find that I am swayed by Chuck's arguments. That, and memories of single malt drinkers who have adamantly claimed that bourbon is not whiskey because it isn't scotch. Not that I have run into this very often, but I have on more that one occasion.

Ed

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polyamnesia

interesting...in that whiskey is a true native american spirit.

and whiskey was pretty much born in ireland. which quite predates america....

whiskey goes east towards scotland, crosses the water and the 'e' falls into the sea......and becomes (scotch) whisk y!

[of course, the whiskey traveling east to west (to america), the 'e' stayed on board!]

hmmmm.....

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ILLfarmboy
I have always tried to use the spelling appropriate to the region. However, I find that I am swayed by Chuck's arguments. That, and memories of single malt drinkers who have adamantly claimed that bourbon is not whiskey because it isn't scotch. Not that I have run into this very often, but I have on more that one occasion.

Ed

I would be interested to know whether such an attitude is from ignorance or snobbery. I'd also like to ask if one considers only whisky made from malted barley to be whisk(e)y how would that person define a distillate made from a fermented grain mash containing grains other than barley?

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Edward_call_me_Ed
I would be interested to know whether such an attitude is from ignorance or snobbery. I'd also like to ask if one considers only whisky made from malted barley to be whisk(e)y how would that person define a distillate made from a fermented grain mash containing grains other than barley?

Equal parts each as far as I can tell. The truely knowable scotch drinkers I have known understand that bourbon is whiskey. One guy I had this conversation with said, "Scotch is whiskey. Bourbon isn't, bourbon is bourbon." I told him to look the relevant terms up in a dictionary.

Ed

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cowdery

I concede that I am trying to get people to think differently. I also think that most of the opponents of my recommendation have helped me make the point because, for the most part, their argument is that while "color" and "colour" are just different spellings of the same word, "whisky" and "whiskey" are two different words. I believe that position is both wrong on its face, unsupported by any lexiconic authority, and illogical.

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