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dave ziegler

The Kinsey Fire Observation Room

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dave ziegler

I just got two more shots from the Philadelphia Publicker plant from my friend Butch today.

Picture 1. far upper Left are fermmentation Spheres also the Walt Whitman bridge. These pictures were taken in Jan 1977 note the delaware river is frozon over. The White tank to the right of the Photo was a fuel oil tank. The pictures were taken from the rear of the Bigler Street maintenance shop.

Picture 2. looking from the maintenance shop dock at a tug boat next to the Carpenter Shop.

I always get excited when I get shots from the Publicker plant as I never had the good fortune to see any of it.

I will be hoping soon to post some pictures of Publicker that are very big so I will take digital photos so I can post them. I will soon have acess to them. I will post when I can to the thread that fits the Pictures and I have been told there may be a old shot of Kinsey from the 1940's which will go on here asap I see it.

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( The Best Old Fashioneds Are, You'll Find

The Mellow, made With KinseyKind! )

Dave Z

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dave ziegler

Here are a couple more pictures given me by my friend who was in management at Publicker. Also one of the Pictures has been highlighted by my Friend Butch who worked at Publicker when I worked at Kinsey, I will post the picture and then the highlighted copy.

1. Publicker Bigler Street Plant pre 1955 per my friend Butch

2. Same picture with Butchs Highlights explaining the buildings also noteing the building that exploded in May 1955 killing 3 people

3. A colume in the Plant

4. An Areial picture of Both Publicker plants bigler st and Snyder Av taken in 1925 given to me by Butch who worked in both plants from 1967.

5. Another Picture from my Management Friend Butch said the building on the far left was the AA Building it was built by the Government at the beginning of WWII to make Rubber, and was sold to Publicker after the war for $1.00 Butch told me this story as He worked there and was told this.

I will be posting more soon from stuff from my friend and Butch too, I hope this is still interesting and I also posted some pictures yesterday on the 1966 Bottle House Thread and some the day before on the Memories thread.

Dave Z

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It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

Well today I am going to post some more very rare and one of a kind pictures on here and the Memories thread.

1. Picture one is an aerial shot of the whole Phila plant area. Bottom Left side is the Phila navel Yard Photo taken before the Walt Whitman bridge was built. Publicker Bigler Street Plant is on the right side close to the middle of page. The Piers on the Left side of The River are Publicker also the extrem right the land is NJ. Sadly years of laying have clouded the Picture a good bit.

2. Sadly in bad shape stuck to glass, if I remove the last of the broken glass the picture will come off too! Here is another shot of the Publicker Plant.

I am slowly finishing up with these rare pictures and I am most thankful to My friend who was in a high position at Publicker for saving these from the dumpster 31 years ago even though in bad shape they are History in so many ways. And to Butch who worked there helping me with stuff in the pictures.

Dave z

===================================================

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

This past Sunday afternoon I decided I needed to take a walk around Kinsey as it had been at least a month since the last time. It was cool and breezes were coming through the plant from the river. I only walked half way back, but the sadness I felt was profound! I looked at the Explosion proof warehouses sitting in ruin vandels doing all they could to forever ruin them.

I walked into Building O opened by vandels to see bottle caps everywhere, and I walked into the Old Government Office there. Government Man Glen Smiths desk fliped over, old files tosed all over. I walked to my right and mounted the stairs to the old storage and shower room so long ago used.

My Heart grew sad I stood there remembering the Holidays back in the day, on the floor lay all that is left of the Government Mens Reusable Christmas tree, I listen for the sounds of the Old 1941 Ford Flat trucks coming up the small hill to get more barrels to dump. Of They are gone but in my Mind I could hear the old flat Head Ford V8's roaring by.

Instead of busy people working as they were the Last day I worked there there was silentness. The People are either Old, Dead or gone to who knows where. The plant sits in ruin and just the banging of broken doors moved by the wind.

When I worked there proudly so did 600 other people, we made good money and had good lives then. Yet Kinsey like a person has grown old and died and is gone forever, leaving me to talk of Her Glory days and the good people, the hard working people that made her great.

I am left with the task of showing all of you what a great Company Publicker Industries and Continental Distilling were. Last night I remembered for the first time in 20 + years the name of the New company man that old Dicky Phiefer did not like His name was Ray Drielblitz and he was nice guy, but Old Dicky got upset at him all the time for no real reason just the way Dicky was. Dicky called him Bluber Guts and hated when he had to work where he was.

Poor Dicky had the job of keeping all the old Trucks and cars going and I can remember times he no sooner fixed a door on one of the old 1941 Trucks someone would smash it right off again.

Later this week I am going to skip ahead on the Distillery catolog I posted early last week to a couple of KY ones and post one or two pictures in large but for the most part if I want to keep putting pictures up I will have to go the small route on pictures so as not to run out of space.

Dave Z

================================================

It seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

I talked to Ludy today and told him about Bill ( Windy Ewing dying. I then asked Ludy to tell me how we went about racking the Barrels when we filled racks so that the Bung would be up when they were in there place in the rack!

We would start by figuering what position on a clock would put the first barrel with its bung up, then the next 3 barrels would be set to start in the rack at 20 minutes each later on the image of a clock. So if the first barrel went in at High Noon the next would be 20 after then 40 after the hour and back to the hour again. This way all the barrels would be Bung up in the racks.

This also was the way to get all the barrels with their bung down to dump on the dump trough. It was important to make sure you got the first one bung down on the trough end and have each one set at 20 minuets on the clock after the first one.

There was not much worse then having all the barrels set wrong and having to move them back and forth till they fell at the right place.

Ludy was telling me that Al Landis now (92) Mr kinsey's great nephew racked all the 20,000 barrels in each of the Old Warehouse's D and E out at the front of the plant when Prohibition ended

Al's Father Hoarce was the master Distiller at Kinsey till the still shut down in spring 1951 forever.

Ludy, Jack Rayser and Al landis are the last 3 Living people that worked For Jacob G Kinsey back in the day as far as Ludy and I can figure.

And there are not alot of people left that worked for Continental Distilling either. Time waits for no one and time has left Kinsey in ruin but it will always be a place of beauty to me as I remember it as it was like a large beautiful Park!

Dave Z

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It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

Ameriica's most magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

I have just heard some talk about a Local man about to buy Kinsey. I wonder about one of the things he talks about doing which is to make the Old Bottle house into some sort of Electric Race car track and other types of things and I find it hard to believe he is talking about giving 25 million for the place. If he keeps the Buildings and makes the rest of them into condo's it would be a great way to preserve her. He seems to talk like that. Wants to find partners to go into it with him.

But first I want to see if he buys it as talk is cheap. I hate seeing it rot so if it fixes the Old Bottle House up it will be a good thing but where does he get the money to clean it up and how does he keep the Vandels out if he does buy it.

I have asked the People who speak to him to introduce me as I am very interested in seeing it saved and I also would like if it is bought and saved to be able to take pictures and see what Happens. It is such a shame that the Old still is gone as the front would have been a great History museum.

Dave Z

Kinsey The Unhurried Whiskey For Unhurried moments

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dave ziegler

The year was 1969 and I had worked at Kinsey for 3 years 3 months it was Wed Dec 24 the day before Christmas and I knew this day was going to be something else. I have written of this before but wanted to talk of it again for this years Christmas.

I was met once I got to the Warehouses by one of the guys I worked with the plan was to get the work we had, allot less then normal done early as tomorrow was Christmas and a well deserved day off. This was my first year in the warehouses and I knew it would be very different then years before in the yard gang.

The first thing my Friend did was give me a full pint bottle of whiskey straight from one of the Future Bourbon barrels. We worked for about 3 hours and then everyone including the boss's and Government men began partying and drinking lots of Whiskey.

By Noon the whole plant was very well Loaded, I pretended to drink to letting the whiskey go back in my bottle as I wanted to watch this happening for the sake of History never knowing all these years later I would be telling this story here on the web.

Even Securtiy was drunk that day! People were laughing talking and having a great time. Lunch time some people were buying Ginger ale in our lunch room to mix with their whiskey and I have been told the big bottle house was in full party mode too.

Government men were in their offices in O bulding sitting near their fake christmas tree they used every year drinking and telling stories of Distilleries they had been at during their carears.

I visited them and found them most happy! At days end we fed the fish extra Wonderbread in the old Cyprus fermenter in the old Dsp-Pa-12 near our time clock and then left for the Holiday. As I drove out Security came out of the Guard box and in a half loaded voice wished me a very Merry Christmas.

Way Different days then no one got hurt no one had an accident everyone acted fairly responsible for themselves leaving.

I am glad that I was the one person to stay sober that day to remember that day 41 years ago in my life I was 22 yrs old then I am now 63 a long time ago but some fond memories of a great Company Publicker Industries and its afiliates Continental Distilling and Kinsey Distillery!

The front water tower used to proudly say Publicker Industries Continental Distilling Division Linfield Pa.

Dave Z

------------------------------------------------------------

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

Well we got about 8 inches of snow last night and this morning I could not help remembering snow days at Kinsey in the Yard gang. The first thing we did was load up the old 1948 Ford pickup with salt and our snow shovels. The Boss would get out the Old tractor and start plowing and before he did he would drop us at different places in the plant to shovel walks including Mr Bryants and ED Zucca's company House down by the river. With well over a Hundred acres of Plant with buildings it was an all day job.

We had company gloves coveralls and sub zero Army Surplus Coats so we were warm and we took breaks from time to time when John Zuber our boss would take us in the back of the old Ford Flathead pickup to the Break room for a cup of coffee from our coffee machine there. It was an Old time coffee machine but the coffee was darn good! We also had crackers and other snacks there.

Then it would be back to work till every side walk at every one of the 21 warehouses, the bottling house and the Old Bottle house and still and grain buildings and the two company houses out front were all clear for safe walking. Many a snowy winter we would be clearing the way to the Coal piles that powered the 2 Coal boilers along with our one oil boiler to heat the plant by over head Pipe lines all the way down to the begining of the road to the steer pens and river, where it stopped.

I was young then and did not mind the hard work and the cold now I am old I hate trying to shovel snow, but I look back to those years which were years that taught me the value of work and to be a reliable person on my Jobs.

To this day I rarely miss a day and up to 2007 for seven years never missed a day of work. In 2007 those who have read my stuff know I almost died was sick in bed for 21 days and when I started to get better started this project of writting the History of Publicker/Continental and Kinsey as much as possible with as many History Pictures as I could get now with close to 2000 Pictures I am still at it.

Every time I get new pictures to post on the memories thread I get excited and I plan to post some more in a day or so as posted some Monday night there And wrote there last night.

Another amazing thing the people who drank on the job even in the worst snow seemed to just keep drinking and working without getting hurt. I was only 19 when I started there and because of being young remeber these things like yesterday.

The harder job then cleaning the snow, was when I went to the warehouses after being bumped and trying to haul barrels with snow everywhere. I think I remember them putting chains on the old 1941 Ford Flat trucks so they would not get stuck till every drive was plowed. Rolling barrels out on the wet docks was a pain everything got wet. But what people today do not relise Pa was one of the earlyest and biggest States back in the Old days for Whiskey especialy Rye Whiskeys and My Sams Mapping book that belonged to Publicker has more then I can count of old Distillerys in Pa!

Pa will always have a great part in the History of Distilling Great Whiskeys and in Pa Publicker will always be thought of as the King in those great days past after prohibition ended.

I really enjoy writting about work days at Kinsey and it is my hope it is not boring to anyone.

Dave Z

---------------------------------------------------------------

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

Here is a picture from an early Photo around Late 1933 of Our Products back then.

1. Picture shows are earliest brands Envoy Club Whiskey, Snug Harbor and Sweep Stakes Straight Whiskey. plus good old Dixie belle Gin and another early gin Caledonia Gin. I am lucky enough to have a Envoy Club Bottle and a Snug Harbor Bottle both late 1933 Products. I also have a couple of Sweep Stakes Straight Whiskey Bottles.

Snug Harbor acording to My Friend who was High up in the Marketing part of the Company was if not the First one of the Very first drinking Whiskeys Continental Distilling made when Prohibition ended!

I got this picture from my friend Butch and I will post a picture of My Envoy Club and Snug Harbor Bottles here soon.

--------------------------------------------------------

The Best Old Fashioneds Are, You'll Find

The Mellow, Made

With Kinsey Kind!

Dave Z

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unclebunk
Here is a picture from an early Photo around Late 1933 of Our Products back then.

1. Picture shows are earliest brands Envoy Club Whiskey, Snug Harbor and Sweep Stakes Straight Whiskey. plus good old Dixie belle Gin and another early gin Caledonia Gin. I am lucky enough to have a Envoy Club Bottle and a Snug Harbor Bottle both late 1933 Products. I also have a couple of Sweep Stakes Straight Whiskey Bottles.

Snug Harbor acording to My Friend who was High up in the Marketing part of the Company was if not the First one of the Very first drinking Whiskeys Continental Distilling made when Prohibition ended!

I got this picture from my friend Butch and I will post a picture of My Envoy Club and Snug Harbor Bottles here soon.

--------------------------------------------------------

The Best Old Fashioneds Are, You'll Find

The Mellow, Made

With Kinsey Kind!

Dave Z

Very interesting texture on the large bottle, Dave. Looking forward to seeing the Snug Harbor and Sweep Stakes bottles too. Thanks!

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dave ziegler

Unclebunk I will post some pictures of Old Continental Bottles if possible this week on this thread! Been doing nothing but shoveling Snow and working lately.

Dave Z

================================================

Kinsey The Unhurried Whiskey

For Unhurried Moments

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dave ziegler

As promised Unclebunk here are a few of my Rare Publicker Bottles.

1.Envoy Club 1933 fall empty. The next two were full when I got them Hallers Straight Rye and Phliadelphia Striaght Rye, a gift from my friend who was high up in Marketing late 1930's They taste wonderful

2. Sweep Stakes Striaght Whiskey / Keystone Striaght rye empty when bought

3. Sweep Stakes Blended / Patrician Striaght Bourbon empty when I got them

4. Original 1930's / 40's Rittenhouse Rye / bottle Snug Harbor Blended Whiskey one of the very first bottles of Whiskey to be made by Continental this one late 1933 Empty when I got them.

5. Kinsey Gold, Embassy Club Whiskey 1940's. empty when I go them

I will post some more pictures of Old Products of ours soon!

Dave Z

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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ethangsmith

Great photos! You are for Kinsey what I am trying to be for Michter's. I love following your research and additions to your collection. It keeps me motivated to keep going ahead with Michter's!

On a side note, I bought a ton of Michter's stuff yesterday and in the box were test bottles of Jacquin's liqueurs that Michter's was producing for them. So it seems Jacquin's wasn't just buying off Continental in the 70's, they were also patronizing their smaller friends to the west too.

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CL
These are the last four I have at hand....1. Tele poles leading back to the Kinsey House. 2.&3. The Kinsey House. 4. A case of Embassy Club whiskey restored by Dave Z.

I used to live in that house. ;-)

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dave ziegler

Hey Chuck good to see you post here, I mowed the lawn many times at the Old House by the river when you were living there and Always enjoyed talking to Your Grandfather Mr Bryant who had the Plant running very good while he was there and Mr Neuman was alive! Everyone in the Bottle house had great respect For Mr Bryant and I always called him Sir in respect to him.

Dave Z

==============================================

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

The years I worked in the Warehouses one of the most important jobs was the dumping of Barrels in the troughs for a trip to stainless tanks and then the Bottle house. As we took the Barrels out of the racks we rolled them to the Trough and the most important thing when doing this was the timing of the Bung to be down when it got on the trough at spots all along the trough!

I will never forget one day when I was in Jack Raysor's gang and we had a new Guy who had been a sargent in the Army for 20 years. He worked very hard but his big problem was the rolling of the Barrels.

He was not satisfiyed with just rolling them in Line, He would slid them side to side to make them a perfect line! It did not matter if we were racking or just moving them to another warehouse to dump but this day he was on Jacks gang and he was so busy sliding them side to side that he paid no attention to where the Bungs would fall when they got to him at the end of the line.

Everyone was timed wrong and Jack who when he got Mad not offten but when he did blew his stack. He said don't EVER Let me see you playing with moving the barrels side to side to make the Line Perfect when we are going to dump.

I don't give a dam if you want to work twice as hard when we are moving them from a building making them line perfect. From now on You will be called LINE UM UP LOUIE, His name was Lou and from that day we used to sing Line um up Louie when ever he worked with us.

I don't remember ever having him in a gang I was in ever again after a couple of months and I think he did not work there long after that. Jack was so mad his face turned red, we had to move them all off and reset everyone of them for the right timing.

This is just one of Many stories I remember from the days of Kinsey.

We also had a fellow who would take his Morning break eating crackers on the toilet not a good place for that and his name was Jim.

Many of us played dice during Break rather then travel to the lunch room if we were in the back of the Plant as it took to long riding on the flat bed of the Old 1952 Dodge Flat truck down to the break room and back when break was over.

We always had guys who liked to mix bottles with Ginger ALe And Whiskey at Break time so the Ginger Ale in our old soda machine was out of it most mornings.

Even though there was alot of Drinking those days, they were also a group of very hard working men who always got the days work done right and our Final product some of the best Whiskeys ever made. And the most important thing unlike the Phila plant we never had a fire or People Killed at Kinsey!

Dave Z

=======================================================

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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Gillman

Dave, I am just curious whether any females worked in any of the warehouse jobs in that era, or was it all men? Can you recall any women workers in the production part of the facility?

Gary

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dave ziegler

Gary when I worked there it was all men, but when Mr Neuman died and they were moving out all the Whiskey in the early 1980's Sandy who had worked on the Bottling lines for many years in the Bottle house worked in the warehouse's.

Somewhere back in my posts is a picture with Her Name written on one of the Old Elevators.

I will have to ask Ludy if during the war any women worked in the Warehouses as He would Know. Going to call him this morning. Taking the Barrels out of the racks tended to be a dirty Job so they gave us Coveralls to wear.

Rolling Barrels all day was hard on the back so we would switch what we were doing during each job.

We also would see many a rat running through when we opened up a warehouse that had been closed for some days or weeks. When a warehouse had been closed for weeks the Blue fumes in the air were amazing, I enjoyed it, was like walking into a giant Whiskey Vaporiser, opened your nose alot quicker then Vicks!

The Explosion Proof switches and light covers and pilot lights sure did their job, never had any fires or explosions. When my gang was dumping we would travel to many warehouses each day to get the lots marked on our dump sheet. In my time I was on 3 to 5 different gangs with different Boss's. Two of them were Jack Raysor, and Ben Meyers, can't remember other Names right now but maybe Ludy can refresh me on other Lead Men they were Union guys who ran the gang because of their ability and years of service.

Dave Z

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It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler
Gary when I worked there it was all men, but when Mr Neuman died and they were moving out all the Whiskey in the early 1980's Sandy who had worked on the Bottling lines for many years in the Bottle house worked in the warehouse's.

Somewhere back in my posts is a picture with Her Name written on one of the Old Elevators.

I will have to ask Ludy if during the war any women worked in the Warehouses as He would Know. Going to call him this morning. Taking the Barrels out of the racks tended to be a dirty Job so they gave us Coveralls to wear.

Rolling Barrels all day was hard on the back so we would switch what we were doing during each job.

We also would see many a rat running through when we opened up a warehouse that had been closed for some days or weeks. When a warehouse had been closed for weeks the Blue fumes in the air were amazing, I enjoyed it, was like walking into a giant Whiskey Vaporiser, opened your nose alot quicker then Vicks!

The Explosion Proof switches and light covers and pilot lights sure did their job, never had any fires or explosions. When my gang was dumping we would travel to many warehouses each day to get the lots marked on our dump sheet. In my time I was on 3 to 5 different gangs with different Boss's. Two of them were Jack Raysor, and Ben Meyers, can't remember other Names right now but maybe Ludy can refresh me on other Lead Men they were Union guys who ran the gang because of their ability and years of service.

Dave Z

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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Gillman

Thanks Dave, that's great, appreciate the info.

Gary

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squire

Dave I appreciate your ongoing efforts in the history section of the Forum. Please keep up the good work.

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dave ziegler

Thanks Squire it means alot to know people like the story of Publicker I put forth. Another important thing in the reasons there was never any major fires or explosions at Kinsey was all the monthly fire drill's done there with the Linfield Fire Company and our Company fireman and truck and the very thing this thread started with, that way back in 1946/47 the Compnay decided to put a fire observation room on top of Explosion proof Warehouse Q at the High Point of the Plant and a double decker one so that you could see arcoss the roof toward the game lands and woods.

Publicker learned from explosions and other things that happened in Phila and put lots of safety measures when they Built the 14 new Buildings. No short cuts on switches all being Explosion proof. Explosion and fire protected fire escapes walls and floors 2 foot thick. and tons of Sprinklers including spending the money to Put sprinklers in every Old Kinsey Building with large water capasity Piping there were sprinkler heads running all 6 levels of the wooden racks in the old Warehouses like H warehouse.

1. Here is a Picture of the Fire observation Tower and room!

I always feel very proud of our Safety records at Kinsey there was never a time I ever worried about explosions or getting hurt. Continental may have made some terrible mistakes in the big Phila Plant but from the moment Kinsey reopened as a division of Publicker Industries even when the Old DSP-pa-12 Distiller was running from late 1940 which it did till spring 1951 there was never any fires or explosions and our Fire drills were very well done and mostly in the Oldest Buidlings even when they were not used anymore they still had heat and Power and Sprinklers working and great roofs with no leaks. IT is this also that made Kinsey very safe.

Dave Z

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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dave ziegler

During the time the Kinsey Plant has been abandon the Old Explosion Proof warehouses have proved how well they were built. Way back in the early 2000's vandels set some almost empty corn whiskey barrels on fire on the third floor of Q warehouse the warehouse with the fire observation room.

The fire company came and put the fire out the only major damage was that they punched a hole in the wall to put water on the fire. The fire was so hot the window glass melted in the fire observation room and ran down the walls. And the window frames bent from the heat.

How ever the building is still strong and I have been in the room around 3 to 4 times. The other time was in warehouse "I" where when the plant was abandoned, there was one corner of this building that had whiskeys and Liquor's abandoned there. They were on skids from the floor to the ceiling 22 feet above on the first floor.

Someone got in there in the late 1990's to early 2000 when no one was watching the place. Long before I ever got there, and they set fire to the spirits, most likely Kids. The fire from all the research I did when I saw its remains burned till it was all burned up. When I went in there was no smell of smoke only cracking on the brick inside the wall next to the fire area, and the broken burned up glass from the labeled bottles. So you had a very hot major fire burning till it went out by itself with almost zero damage to the Explosion proof warehouse.

This is a great testament to the Buildings, their Builder Mc Cuskie Builders of Phila and Kelly for Brick and Continental Distilling's engineers.

I was able to salvage a bit of Peanut Liquor from the very bottom of the Pile but everything else burned up. And the reason I know it burned itself out was the lack of any water on the floor or Fire fighting chemicals. So it may well have burned for days with no one knowing till it burned out.

Seeing this I have no doubt that they would have done their job had there ever been an explosion in one of them to contain it! Those buildings may be forgotten and abandoned but in my Heart they bring great memories of a great company and great products and great people working there!

Dave Z

The Best Old Fashioneds Are You'll Find

The Mellow, Made With Kinsey Kind!

===================================================

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dave ziegler

Last week I when I walked around Kinsey as I walked in I looked over to see the Fire control room where Cal Roberts and Harry Martin used to hang out and work out of, now Hidden by weeds and trees. Back in the day they would walk behind the old Grain prep Building around the still and get the Old Fire truck out of 1892 Number 10 Rye Barn where it was kept when I worked there, back it down the lane and drive it through the Plant once a week to the delight of the people working in the plant as they would test the sirun as they drove around.

Once a month they would get it out for the Monthly Fire drills. During the week every week they would go down the list of Buildings testing a couple every day opening Hydrants and testing presure. Both Men were well liked by everyone and I never felt any danger from fire.

Every building as I have said many times was sprinkeled and had heat and power including the Old DSP-Pa-12 and rye Barn even though they were not used anymore for the most part. It was these safety things that kept us from ever having any type of fire there.

Dave

--------------------------------------------------------------------

It Seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory

America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

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