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barturtle
05-03-2009, 06:21
If only they could get it right...:smiley_acbt:



Bourbon County claims the honor of invention, again by legend, Veach said, noting that by the time the county formed in 1785, there were dozens upon dozens of small farmer-distillers making a corn-based whiskey that came to be called "bourbon" after the county. Currently, only such whiskey from Kentucky can be called "bourbon."

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20090503/FEATURES/905030303&referrer=FRONTPAGECAROUSEL

p_elliott
05-04-2009, 08:11
Actually Mike says he's miss quoted in this article may times.

barturtle
05-04-2009, 08:15
Yeah, I'm not surprised. For some reason they sent an Art Critic and Gardening Columnist to write an article on bourbon history.

boone
05-05-2009, 02:06
If only they could get it right...:smiley_acbt:



http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20090503/FEATURES/905030303&referrer=FRONTPAGECAROUSEL

Henry McKenna is not Jim Beam product, it's Heaven Hill's...

The picture of William Heaven Hill has Evan Willliams name on it.

barturtle
05-08-2009, 07:27
You know...I emailed the author, the editor and the corrections dept on the day this was published...there are several comments that also correct this issue, but still the article hasn't been fixed or a correction published...

bourbonv
05-08-2009, 08:02
Eric Gregory is putting together a response to the article. Larry Kass told me he even sent her some hard copies of material and she still got the facts wrong.

Mike Veach

cowdery
05-13-2009, 11:59
Like Mike, I talk to reporters all the time. It's very frustrating when you give them the correct information but they still get it wrong in the article. It's especially frustrating when they cite you as the source, as she did with Mike, since it gives the impression that Mike doesn't know any better, when I'm sure he gave her the correct information in every instance.

Just somebody who is not very good at her job, I'm afraid.

Sometimes you can tell when it's going to happen, because they keep asking you variations on the same questions and can't seem to grasp the answers. Sometimes it's because they already think they know things and just don't hear (or care) when you tell them something contrary to what they already believe.

If you want evidence that a relative novice can ask a lot of questions and relay the answers accurately, read 99 Drams of Whiskey, by Kate Hopkins, AKA the Accidental Hedonist (http://www.accidentalhedonist.com/).