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Bulleit...Rye?


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JeffRenner
I have found Bulleit to be pretty low on the totem pole. I think Pikesville is a better pour and you can get a 1.75 of it for less than a 750 of Bulleit.

I have a friend who visits MD every once in a while and who often brings me back a handle of Pikesville. Sadly, the last one was 3-years-old rather than the previous 4-y-o, and it showed. I wish the distilleries wouldn't do this.

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I have a friend who visits MD every once in a while and who often brings me back a handle of Pikesville. Sadly, the last one was 3-years-old rather than the previous 4-y-o, and it showed. I wish the distilleries wouldn't do this.

No kiddin'?

That 4yo was that much better than the 3yo?!

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No kiddin'?

That 4yo was that much better than the 3yo?!

Hmm. I wonder if they were from different distilleries?

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I have a friend who visits MD every once in a while and who often brings me back a handle of Pikesville. Sadly, the last one was 3-years-old rather than the previous 4-y-o, and it showed. I wish the distilleries wouldn't do this.
Hmm. I wonder if they were from different distilleries?

I wrote Heaven Hill last year about the age of Pikesville Straight Rye. They wrote back the it used to be aged 4 yrs., but they recently reduced it to 3 yrs. because of its high demand. They indicated that the Rittenhouse Rye continues to be a 4 yr. old.

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I wrote Heaven Hill last year about the age of Pikesville Straight Rye. They wrote back the it used to be aged 4 yrs., but they recently reduced it to 3 yrs. because of its high demand. They indicated that the Rittenhouse Rye continues to be a 4 yr. old.

Interesting!

Rittenhouse is probably still B-F made but I was wondering if Pikesville is now Bernheim distillate.

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JeffRenner
No kiddin'?

That 4yo was that much better than the 3yo?!

Yeah, the 3yo is a bit feinty. The one I really miss, though, is Fleishmann's rye, which used to be 4yo, then 3yo, and then disappeared entirely from Wisconsin, which is the only place I could get it. The 4yo was a terrific inexpensive little rye.

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Rye is a complex and assertive whiskey...

I am also an aficionado of Islay single malt scotch, but am similarly cautious when introducing new Scotch drinkers to the single malt scotch world. I would first have them try one of the Highland single malts, and then perhaps Bunnahabhain (one of the less peaty Islays).

So where would you go after Bunnahabhain? I fell in love with the 12-year last year. I've got my eye on the Laphroaig Quarter Cask and Bruichladdich, but I haven't found anything in their line-up I'm comfortable laying out the dough for. I picked up a bottle of Kilchoman this past weekend. I thought it was the new Spring 2011 bottling, but turns out it's Summer 2010. Enjoyable, but it hasn't inspired enough enthusiasm in me yet.

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So where would you go after Bunnahabhain?

I'm also a huge fan of Islay whisky. After the Bunnahabhain, I would suggest Caol Ila 12. Also, while not Islay, Talisker is another good place to start on the journey through smokey whiskies. There is nothing wrong with going straight to Laphroaig... or Ardbeg, but if you want to do it gradually, those are the two I would recommend.

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So where would you go after Bunnahabhain? I fell in love with the 12-year last year. I've got my eye on the Laphroaig Quarter Cask and Bruichladdich, but I haven't found anything in their line-up I'm comfortable laying out the dough for. I picked up a bottle of Kilchoman this past weekend. I thought it was the new Spring 2011 bottling, but turns out it's Summer 2010. Enjoyable, but it hasn't inspired enough enthusiasm in me yet.
I'm also a huge fan of Islay whisky. After the Bunnahabhain, I would suggest Caol Ila 12. Also, while not Islay, Talisker is another good place to start on the journey through smokey whiskies. There is nothing wrong with going straight to Laphroaig... or Ardbeg, but if you want to do it gradually, those are the two I would recommend.

Islay single malts: The Lagavulin 16 year is excellent as is the Ardbeg 10 yr. (they are both in my cabinet!). I have not tried the other Ardbeg's, but many of the reviews have been outstanding. Bruichladddich is also excellent, but can be hard to find. I had the opportunity to try the Laphroaig Quarter Cask at a dinner party and was blown away with its smoky and peat character. Bowmore is also quite good, but the peat character is toned down considerably. Enjoy!

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After the Bunnahabhain, I would suggest Caol Ila 12. Also, while not Islay, Talisker is another good place to start on the journey through smokey whiskies. There is nothing wrong with going straight to Laphroaig... or Ardbeg, but if you want to do it gradually, those are the two I would recommend.
Islay single malts: The Lagavulin 16 year is excellent as is the Ardbeg 10 yr. (they are both in my cabinet!). I have not tried the other Ardbeg's, but many of the reviews have been outstanding. Bruichladddich is also excellent, but can be hard to find. I had the opportunity to try the Laphroaig Quarter Cask at a dinner party and was blown away with its smoky and peat character. Bowmore is also quite good, but the peat character is toned down considerably. Enjoy!

Thanks for the rec's guys! Bowmore was another one I had my eye on, but the entry price on these whiskys is so high... it's hard to justify a bottle purchase without first hand experience. One of these days I'll make it over to Duke of Perth (Chicago bar) for tastings of all of these.

I've enjoyed a rare bottle of Caol Ila in the past. I picked up the last cask strength unpeated expression, and I like it but I'm missing the fresh sea salt of Bunnahabhain. I'm searching for that sea salt, more so than smoke.

I found a link to this flavor map somewhere in this forum. I found it interesting:

http://www.malts.com/index.php/en_us/Choosing-Whisky/A-World-of-Flavour/The-Single-Malt-Whisky-Flavour-Map

Sorry for the somewhat OT jaunt here!

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Thanks for the rec's guys! Bowmore was another one I had my eye on, but the entry price on these whiskys is so high... it's hard to justify a bottle purchase without first hand experience. One of these days I'll make it over to Duke of Perth (Chicago bar) for tastings of all of these.

...

In Chicago, I have found Delilah's (www.delilahschicago.com) to be a great place to sample whiskies in Chicago. They have 400+ whiskies (including bourbon, rye, and single malt scotch) and the bartenders are quite knowledgeable and a great source of recommendations. Pours are commonly $7-$8 - a minimal cost way to sample. I don't find it the most relaxing place to sip and enjoy a whisky - but I've never come across a bar with this extensive of a whiskey selection. (I haven't been to the Duke of Perth.)

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I'm searching for that sea salt, more so than smoke.

Then you may want to try Old Pulteney or Clynelish 14, though the latter will set you back around $50.

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... but I'm missing the fresh sea salt of Bunnahabhain. I'm searching for that sea salt, more so than smoke. ...

Since you have enjoyed the Bunnahabhain 12 year old, I would try the Lagavulin 16 yr. - it is outstanding and it shows more iodine in the taste. The price, however, is much higher: About $72 at some internet retailers, but it can be priced as high as $90 in stores depending on the state.

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I love you guys, but this is...a rye thread....7 posts may be a bit too much...;)

I Love Lagavulin 16...:D

But, stop...

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My favorite WTF momement in that article:

To qualifyin the sub-category of straight small batch ryes, which the new Bulleit Rye falls into, the mash bill must be at least 80 percent rye, which Bulleit Rye meets and exceeds with its very heavy 95 percent rye mash bill.

I was once in a grouchy mood (hard to believe I know) and was reading an blog article on Bulleit Bourbon. The guy was raving about what a genius Tom Bulleit was.

I left the following comment: "You know that Tom Bulleit has about as much to do with Bulleit Bourbon as the Morgan Family has to do with Capt. Morgan, right?"

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Parkersback

From the article on Bulleit that Chuck linked to:

The brand’s international influence is never more evident than with our neighbors to the north where Bulleit is Canada’s number one selling bourbon.

REALLY??!? I'm stunned by this.

Presumably they aren't counting Jack Daniels. But Bulleit now sells more in Canada than Jim Beam White? Evan Williams Black? Wild Turkey101?

This can't be right.

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My favorite WTF momement in that article:

I was once in a grouchy mood (hard to believe I know) and was reading an blog article on Bulleit Bourbon. The guy was raving about what a genius Tom Bulleit was.

I left the following comment: "You know that Tom Bulleit has about as much to do with Bulleit Bourbon as the Morgan Family has to do with Capt. Morgan, right?"

Quick, somebody tell Scott Bush to change his label to read "Straight SMALL BATCH Rye.":lol: :lol:

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From the article on Bulleit that Chuck linked to:

The brand’s international influence is never more evident than with our neighbors to the north where Bulleit is Canada’s number one selling bourbon.

REALLY??!? I'm stunned by this.

Presumably they aren't counting Jack Daniels. But Bulleit now sells more in Canada than Jim Beam White? Evan Williams Black? Wild Turkey101?

This can't be right.

Don't underestimate Diageo's ability to bully the LC Board's of Canada for distribution points.

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Read the Bourbon Review article about it.

I'll have some of whatever they're smoking.

I always have some of what they're smoking, but it doesn't make me write utter bull---t. It's always stunning to see the misinformation that gets passed off as reporting.

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Since the article was so heavily sourced from Diageo, it's hard to know what's bad reporting and what's misrepresentation.

Re Canada, I checked with someone in a position to know definitively. It ain't so. Bigger than Jim Beam? Not hardly. Maybe best-selling super premium bourbon, beating Knob and Woodford, but I can't believe they beat Maker's.

I like Tom Bulleit, but he really should be ashamed of himself.

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Is it wrong that I paged through the magazine and never even noticed the article? Of course this was while I was at the General Nelson for the sampler/gazebo festivities and maybe I did read it :lol: .

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Presumably they aren't counting Jack Daniels. But Bulleit now sells more in Canada than Jim Beam White? Evan Williams Black? Wild Turkey101?

This can't be right.

Well, you can't get Wild Turkey 101 or Evan Williams Black in Ontario, and bourbon is stupid expensive ($28 for Beam White, and Bulleit ain't so far off that) so I'm not too surprised. Maker's "fancy bourbon" marketing isn't as effective up here (where people drink Canadian whisky for "smooth") and every bar I go to has Bulleit and maybe one of Beam or Wild Turkey 80 as the well. When your only options are Bulleit, Knob Creek, and Woodford as reasonable pours, and Bulleit is the cheapest of the 3, pickings get slim. (That said, I prefer KC and the random bottlings they get every few months - I stocked up on Ritt BIB and EC12 when both were available.)

That said, if it outsells Beam White I'd be surprised.

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The point that was made to me by an industry person is that in Canada they are pricing it closer to Beam white than to its usual competition here, like Knob, Woodford, Maker's, Rare Breed, etc., so it is winning in the super-premium segment by underpricing the segment, but it's not beating Jim and Jack. That's what Rod Blagojevich would call, "a non-factual statement."

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