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Sven Heuchert

Ribs with selfmade BBQ-sauce from a boar I hunted the other week. First grilled, now in the oven for another 15mins to let it soak the sauce in. 

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Baby backs, Bells Lager of the Lakes, and a shameless pic of Little Whammie. 

Reverse seared prime NY strip on the Big Green Egg. The Misses isn't a steak fan, so I cooked burgers for her and Little Whammie on the Blackstone. Threw some cubed sweet potatoes in the oven to round

I’ve never posted to this thread before. I smoke a lot of meat but generally small batches on a Big Green Egg. My dad has a real smoker though and once in a while I drag it up to my house. Love this t

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This i somewhat off topic, but bear with me.

 

Yesterday was a beautiful early spring day, with a high of around 80 F. I decided to grill some salmon fillets for lunch. But, when I opened the Big Green Egg, it was full of mold. Thick mold. Ugh!

 

So, I studied what to do. I tried to build a big fire in it, but it never got over 400 degrees and it didn't stay that hot for very long. I think it was having to cook the water out or something. After the charcoal was all burned up, I left the lid open to the sun and fresh air for the rest of the day. But it was predicted to be raining again, Sunday. So, I took an online suggestion and made two wadded up aluminum foil "snakes", and put them under the grill topper so it would NOT form an air-tight seal. I left the grill's bottom vent wide open, and I left the fabric cover off of the grill. The point is to let fresh air circulate through the grill. I hope it works, and if anyone else has problems with grill mold after the winter, I hope these ideas can help them, too.

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32 minutes ago, ratcheer said:

This i somewhat off topic, but bear with me.

 

Yesterday was a beautiful early spring day, with a high of around 80 F. I decided to grill some salmon fillets for lunch. But, when I opened the Big Green Egg, it was full of mold. Thick mold. Ugh!

 

So, I studied what to do. I tried to build a big fire in it, but it never got over 400 degrees and it didn't stay that hot for very long. I think it was having to cook the water out or something. After the charcoal was all burned up, I left the lid open to the sun and fresh air for the rest of the day. But it was predicted to be raining again, Sunday. So, I took an online suggestion and made two wadded up aluminum foil "snakes", and put them under the grill topper so it would NOT form an air-tight seal. I left the grill's bottom vent wide open, and I left the fabric cover off of the grill. The point is to let fresh air circulate through the grill. I hope it works, and if anyone else has problems with grill mold after the winter, I hope these ideas can help them, too.

Once "no-grill" season is upon us, I usually do a big burn in the egg. Finish grilling for the final time, then throw in a pile of fuel and open the throttle. Let it burn at 1000+ degrees for a half hour or so. Let it cool, clean it out and cover it for the season. That has worked well for me. These things are like enormous Petri dishes otherwise.

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12 hours ago, ratcheer said:

This i somewhat off topic, but bear with me.

 

Yesterday was a beautiful early spring day, with a high of around 80 F. I decided to grill some salmon fillets for lunch. But, when I opened the Big Green Egg, it was full of mold. Thick mold. Ugh!

 

So, I studied what to do. I tried to build a big fire in it, but it never got over 400 degrees and it didn't stay that hot for very long. I think it was having to cook the water out or something. After the charcoal was all burned up, I left the lid open to the sun and fresh air for the rest of the day. But it was predicted to be raining again, Sunday. So, I took an online suggestion and made two wadded up aluminum foil "snakes", and put them under the grill topper so it would NOT form an air-tight seal. I left the grill's bottom vent wide open, and I left the fabric cover off of the grill. The point is to let fresh air circulate through the grill. I hope it works, and if anyone else has problems with grill mold after the winter, I hope these ideas can help them, too.

1. Make sure to stir existing charcoal, clean out the ash, then light some new charcoal. This should resolve any issues with it not getting hotter than 400⁰.

2. Open the bottom vent when you're not cooking. This allows air flow and should prevent mold growth. I had some mold growth when mine was pretty new. Since I've started having the vent open I haven't had any mold. 

3. I live in STL. We dont have crazy winters, but we do get some snow, and we get temps below 0⁰ on occasion. I Egg year round, but I get it that not everyone likes to. 

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Harry in WashDC
12 hours ago, jbutler said:

Once "no-grill" season is upon us, I usually do a big burn in the egg. Finish grilling for the final time, then throw in a pile of fuel and open the throttle. Let it burn at 1000+ degrees for a half hour or so. Let it cool, clean it out and cover it for the season. That has worked well for me. These things are like enormous Petri dishes otherwise.

I have no BGE.   BUT,  my Dad (who grew up a dirt farmer in Iowa and, after he joined the Navy so we moved all over the damn place) cooked BBQ in 55 gallon drums he had split lengthwise wherever we were living used this method to clean them.  IT WORKS on all kinds of grills/eggs/Webers/kettles regardless of size, shape, location (although Virginia mold took longer to cook off than NY mold).  Grill grates may warp from the excess heat, but they are cheap ($15) and available at Ace Hardware and, of course, Amazon.  OR, take the grates out before superheating the kettle and put them through the dishwasher or use Dawn degreaser and a good, scrubber sponge.  Of course, you all knew that.  Didn't you?!

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Thanks. Those are all good tips.

 

As to "no grill" season, it rains a lot in the winter here in the Deep South. And, this winter has been rainier than usual. Normal rainfall for Jan+Feb is 10"; this year, we had 25". And it is still raining a lot this March.

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11 hours ago, dcbt said:

No such season exists!  :)

Unfortunately, I live in an area where smoke in the air during autumn freaks people out. So September through December is usually voluntary no-grill season for me. That being said, I grilled some chicken and a couple racks of ribs last weekend ... in the rain no less.

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5 hours ago, jbutler said:

Unfortunately, I live in an area where smoke in the air during autumn freaks people out. So September through December is usually voluntary no-grill season for me. That being said, I grilled some chicken and a couple racks of ribs last weekend ... in the rain no less.

We Seattleites fully understand the need for grilling in the rain. Grilling season is year round for me.

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Chicken wings on the Egg, cubed sweet potatoes in the oven, Busch Light in my koozie, and Waylon Jennings playing on the speakers. 

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StarSurfer55

So we put a pergola on our deck a few years ago which I put a roof on after a couple of years.  This has become my winter grilling/smoking area.  I usually hang tarps for additional shelter.  I have a camp chef smoker and bought the blanket for it.  It was one of the best investments that I have made. it really helps the smoker to maintain temperature in cold weather and reduces my pellet usage.  The coldest that I have smokes is at -10. IMG_8471.thumb.jpeg.80cbd8942bacaed41dc31a7a15ba9b1b.jpeg

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StarSurfer55

Sven,

 

That is one nice hog.  What did it weigh?  Are wild boarhogs a problem in Germany as they are in the Deep South here.  They can be very destructive.

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Couple chunks of brisket from last 1/3 cow we got.   

Also did some chuck roast for shredding - but no pics of that...

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Sven Heuchert
1 hour ago, StarSurfer55 said:

Sven,

 

That is one nice hog.  What did it weigh?  Are wild boarhogs a problem in Germany as they are in the Deep South here.  They can be very destructive.

That one was roughly around 50 kilo, so rather small. Yeah, not really a big problem like in the east of Germany, but as you know they replicate very fast and we see very large numbers even in the west right now, so the biggest problem I guess for a hunter is the costs of what we call "Wildschaden", the destruction the boars do to corn or fields. A hunter rents the right to hunt for a specific area from the owner, usually a farmer, and has to pay compensation. So, you have to be careful with that. as the costs rise very fast. I guess the boars in the South are a different animal, they looker bigger and seem to have a more muscular build, I guess they are heavier as well. Biggest boar I seen here ( which is sadly didn't shot myself) was 120 kilo, a male Keiler, and that one looked like you took it right out of a nightmare. The ones here you can normally shoot with a regular .308 Win, but I like to have a 30 06 at hand, ( I own a Drilling) just to be sure. 

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StarSurfer55

Sven,

 

Thanks.  The issue in the US is that they can cross with domestic pigs so some of the wild boars can get very large.  They are very destructive and we have  small band across mid-michigan where they are a problem.  In Louisiana, where I am originally, they are considered  a nuisance and hunted regularly. Since they are close to subdivisions here, pig guns are based on large calibers shooting a subsonic round to limit range.  the .458 SOCOM and .450 bushmaster on the AR platforms are popular pig calibers.  If i recall my guns correctly, a drilling is basically a double barrel shotgun with a rifle barrel underneath.  Do you load the shotgun with Slugs as  backup for pigs.  Most people don't realize how dangerous pigs can be.  A large boar can do a lot of damage with his tusks and not something to be careless around.  Good hunting.

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6 hours ago, Skinsfan1311 said:

Chops & oven roasted,  pan finished rutabagas...

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Loox Tasty!   I don't hear many folx seeking and enjoying the humble rutabaga as much as the (admittedly) few I knew who did in the days of my youth (many a decade past).    Personally I LOVE 'em!

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StarSurfer55

Okay my peeps, It is Saturday morning and time to get our smokers going.  I have andouille sausage stuffed pork loin wrapped in bacon as well as chicken breasts to go on the smoker.  I did not have any of my usual rub so I am using one of our favorites, Coconut Jack’s Mango Bango Sauce cut with a little apple cider vinegar for a bit of jerk style.  My beverage for later will be rum and cokes made with Bayou Marci Gras XO rum. I make mine a bit differently.  I put a the juice of a half lime and a teaspoons of Gran Mariner in mine to help the flavors blend a bit.

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57 minutes ago, StarSurfer55 said:

Okay my peeps, It is Saturday morning and time to get our smokers going.  I have andouille sausage stuffed pork loin wrapped in bacon as well as chicken breasts to go on the smoker.  I did not have any of my usual rub so I am using one of our favorites, Coconut Jack’s Mango Bango Sauce cut with a little apple cider vinegar for a bit of jerk style.  My beverage for later will be rum and cokes made with Bayou Marci Gras XO rum. I make mine a bit differently.  I put a the juice of a half lime and a teaspoons of Gran Mariner in mine to help the flavors blend a bit.

A208951A-52D7-4364-8845-2A566C26904D.jpeg

Now that's how you quarantine!

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Yesterday, I made loin pork chops on the grill. I made my own simple rub of store-bought rib-rub mixed half and half with Tony Chachere's Creole seasoning. I thoroughly browned them over the fire, then wrapped them in heavy duty foil with a sauce of butter, apple cider vinegar, and pure sorghum syrup (which is thick like molasses). Cooked another 25 minutes, then let them rest for 5 minutes in the foil but off of the grill.

 

They were delicious. Sorry, no pictures - I usually eat everything up before I even think about taking photos. ?

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StarSurfer55

SEnding a little bit of love out to SVEN in Cologne.  The Germans settled In South Louisiana long the Mississippi River and brought their sausage making skills with them. Andouille Is really a German sausage with a French name. I prefer Savoies but which I have to buy from Cajungrocer.com. It is really a cooking sausage and bring a lot of smoke and a bit of spice to every dish.

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Good afternoon all. I did fire up the smoker, SS55!! I brined some chicken wings yesterday (I almost always do salt & sugar). Then, I marinated them for 20 hrs in a locally sourced hot sauce. Now they are in the smoker with some apple wood. 

 

Enjoying a wheat beer on the patio and watching a thunderstorm roll through the area. 

 

Prost! Phil 

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1 hour ago, StarSurfer55 said:

SEnding a little bit of love out to SVEN in Cologne.  The Germans settled In South Louisiana long the Mississippi River and brought their sausage making skills with them. Andouille Is really a German sausage with a French name. I prefer Savoies but which I have to buy from Cajungrocer.com. It is really a cooking sausage and bring a lot of smoke and a bit of spice to every dish.

7639AEF4-5B16-4E85-B4B3-38BC4F6B7A21.jpeg

This is the kind of tip that is priceless! I am always looking for quality ingredients that aren't found in the local grocery stores. 

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Harry in WashDC

We did our “senior shopping” Thursday.  Wife slipped a tri-tip into the cart as a surpris for me.  That cut is rare back here but getting easier to find.  I no longer have to special order. Pics when I cook it.

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