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kjbeggs

What cocktail are you enjoying Fall/Winter 2014

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kjbeggs

Tonight, I'm having my first attempt at a "Julian" style old-Fashioned.

Raw sugar cube

Several drops of Angostura bitters

Several drops of Orange bitters

Orange wedge

2.5 oz of Pappy 20

1. Place a brown sugar cube on an absorbent napkin or paper towel. Saturate the cube with 8 or 9 drops (not dashes) of Angostura, then of orange bitters. Place the cube in a heavy glass and add the orange wedge. Muddle the sugar cube and orange wedge together for 5 to 6 minutes, avoiding any skin and pith, till all the cells of the orange burst and the sugar melts into a syrup.

2.dd 1/2 ounce bourbon and muddle into the syrup for 3 to 4 minutes. Add a handful of ice cubes and 1 ounce of bourbon. Stir for 30 seconds and decant into a high-ball glass. Add one more 1/2 ounce bourbon and stir three times. Serve at once.

Note: Julian's recipe calls for 107 proof bourbon, but I used my open bottle of 20 Yr on my first attempt.

I know many will consider drinking PVW any way other than neat as a blasphemous act, but it's my bourbon, and i'll drink it any damn way I see fit. :cool:

(I did pour myself an ounce to enjoy neat while crafting this cocktail).

Edited by kjbeggs

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jersey12

So how was it? Sounds pretty tasty but more than 10 mins just making a cocktail seems like a lot of work... but maybe I'm just impatient.

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kjbeggs
So how was it? Sounds pretty tasty but more than 10 mins just making a cocktail seems like a lot of work... but maybe I'm just impatient.

It was quite tasty, although I think it would have benefited from the higher proof.

In fact, I made a second one, planning to use OWA. When I found out my inventory was off, and I didn't actually have any, I used MMCS. could have been improved mixing skills, but the second one was better.

They did take several minutes to make, but as I said, sipping on some neat PVW passed the time, and I sipped the finished product slowly, enjoying my work.

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KyleCBreese

I just saw this in Sean Brock's new cookbook. I think it was also featured on Mind of a Chef, when Brock was on the show. It calls for 107 proof Van Winkle, is that the 10 and the 15?

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tanstaafl2

I personally find the muddled orange wedge to be a bit much plus it requires some care to muddle and not add any bitterness from the peel. I prefer to add a dash more orange bitters if necessary and dump the wedge! Or perhaps add a touch of orange zest and express the oil from the peel over the drink to get the aroma without as much juice.

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Harry in WashDC

What the free lunch guy said - it's what bitters are for.

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kjbeggs
I personally find the muddled orange wedge to be a bit much plus it requires some care to muddle and not add any bitterness from the peel. I prefer to add a dash more orange bitters if necessary and dump the wedge! Or perhaps add a touch of orange zest and express the oil from the peel over the drink to get the aroma without as much juice.

That's similar to what I did on my second one. I removed the peel and as much of the pith as I could and muddled that with Demarara sugar and the bitters.

When done, I used the peel as you suggested. Definite difference.

BTW, here's a link to Brock's version of the recipe: http://gearpatrol.com/2014/10/24/recipe-sean-brocks-pappy-van-winkle-cocktail/

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Gillman

For a long time I was making the Sazerac but returned recently to the Manhattan. It's an odd thing perhaps with the Manhattan, but I find what works best is not something too woody and matured.

I made one tonight just with Stock red vermouth and Woodford Reserve. It's got exactly the right tangs and richness. I don't really like the Woodford on its own, I can't get past the cookie dough-like taste which I assume is from the Versailles element as aged 5-6 years. But in a cocktail, or presumably with Coke, it is A-1. Same kind of logic applies to straight rye that is 4-6 years old, say. Everything has its place…

Gary

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ratcheer

I had a "hot whiskey" last night. Honey, baby Saz, a pinch of cinnamon, two cloves, and a half cup of steaming hot water. Very nice before bed, but I got a little too much honey.

Tim

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Gillman
I had a "hot whiskey" last night. Honey, baby Saz, a pinch of cinnamon, two cloves, and a half cup of steaming hot water. Very nice before bed, but I got a little too much honey.

Tim

Why didn't you add more whiskey, Tim?

Gary

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ratcheer
Why didn't you add more whiskey, Tim?

Gary

Good thinking. But, I didn't think of it. :blush:

Tim

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nd2005
Tonight, I'm having my first attempt at a "Julian" style old-Fashioned.

Raw sugar cube

Several drops of Angostura bitters

Several drops of Orange bitters

Orange wedge

2.5 oz of Pappy 20

1. Place a brown sugar cube on an absorbent napkin or paper towel. Saturate the cube with 8 or 9 drops (not dashes) of Angostura, then of orange bitters. Place the cube in a heavy glass and add the orange wedge. Muddle the sugar cube and orange wedge together for 5 to 6 minutes, avoiding any skin and pith, till all the cells of the orange burst and the sugar melts into a syrup.

2.dd 1/2 ounce bourbon and muddle into the syrup for 3 to 4 minutes. Add a handful of ice cubes and 1 ounce of bourbon. Stir for 30 seconds and decant into a high-ball glass. Add one more 1/2 ounce bourbon and stir three times. Serve at once.

Note: Julian's recipe calls for 107 proof bourbon, but I used my open bottle of 20 Yr on my first attempt.

I know many will consider drinking PVW any way other than neat as a blasphemous act, but it's my bourbon, and i'll drink it any damn way I see fit. :cool:

(I did pour myself an ounce to enjoy neat while crafting this cocktail).

I think the original recipe from JVW called for a Satsuma Mandarin. It would be too low-brow to use a lowly navel orange.

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kjbeggs
I think the original recipe from JVW called for a Satsuma Mandarin. It would be too low-brow to use a lowly navel orange.

Wel, I used a "cutie" orange on my last one... :cool:

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Old Dusty

Today, Apple Brandy Old Fashioned:

1oz WT Rye 101

1oz Laird's BIB Apple Brandy

demerara sugar cube muddled w healthy dashes of Orange bitters.

stirred w ice in a rocks glass.

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Old Dusty

Continuing the Apple Brandy theme:

Parlour Manhattan

1oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy

1oz Rittenhouse Bonded Rye

.5oz Carpano Antica Formula sweet vermouth

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Note: I used WT 101 Rye rather than Ritt BIB, and Fee Bros Barrel Aged Bitters rather than Ango.

Edited by Old Dusty

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tanstaafl2

This is often referred to as the "American Trilogy" cocktail which hasn't been around as long as you might think having been created in NY in around 2007 as part of the growth of the cocktail movement. Rye and Laird's BIB make sense for two thirds of the name but I have never quite figured out what made the third part of the trilogy!

Today, Apple Brandy Old Fashioned:

1oz WT Rye 101

1oz Laird's BIB Apple Brandy

demerara sugar cube muddled w healthy dashes of Orange bitters.

stirred w ice in a rocks glass.

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Old Dusty
This is often referred to as the "American Trilogy" cocktail which hasn't been around as long as you might think having been created in NY in around 2007 as part of the growth of the cocktail movement. Rye and Laird's BIB make sense for two thirds of the name but I have never quite figured out what made the third part of the trilogy!

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tanstaafl2
Well, if you use Angostura bitters then I agree, I went w Fee Bros so maybe that is the third part of the trilogy? Or maybe American sugar/simple syrup? :grin:

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nd2005

Black Manhattan:

1.5 Oz Rittenhouse

.75 Oz Dolin Rouge

.75 Oz Amaro Averna

Dash of bitters

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zillah

My Four Roses Small Batch went bad real quick, so I threw it a New York Sour and Old Fashioneds.

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FlounderinDC

Since it is the holidays and I'm off until Monday I had a couple of Old Fashioneds earlier....

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Harry in WashDC
This is often referred to as the "American Trilogy" . . .[,] I have never quite figured out what made the third part of the trilogy!

This sat in the back of my mind for awhile. Maybe the third leg is sugar/molasses, in the form of demerara, which, during the Colonial period, made up one leg of the trade upon which much of our fledgling international economy depended. Until the growth of the whiskey industry, apple brandy and rum, the latter of which depends on sugar, were our primary homegrown spirits. Thus, all three key American spirits are represented in this drink.

Whatever, after some little internet searching, I ran across an article quoting Richard Boccato who, with Michael McIlroy, is credited with creating (or reviving?) this drink. He, like tan . . . 2, has no idea what the third leg of the trilogy really is. See this for more - http://drinkwire.liquor.com/post/imbibing-mr-boston-american-trilogy-cocktail

Edited by Harry in WashDC
McIlroy, not McElroy

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ratcheer

I made a strange but very good cocktail, yesterday. 1 oz Tito's vodka, about 4 oz Antica Formula sweet vermouth, and a couple of dashes of Angostura bitters.

I thought surely it had already been invented, so I searched for a while, but didn't find anything the same. I found several very similar cocktail recipes, but they all included Campari. Maybe I'll try it that way, next time. :wink:

Tim

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tanstaafl2
Black Manhattan:

1.5 Oz Rittenhouse

.75 Oz Dolin Rouge

.75 Oz Amaro Averna

Dash of bitters

Made a bunch of these the other night but used the Washington Post variation of the Kindred Cocktail recipe which skipped the vermouth and used 2:1 rye to Averna with a dash of Regan's orange bitters. Pretty darn good!

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nd2005
Made a bunch of these the other night but used the Washington Post variation of the Kindred Cocktail recipe which skipped the vermouth and used 2:1 rye to Averna with a dash of Regan's orange bitters. Pretty darn good!

After the first try I bumped up the rye content to make it more like a 2:1 ratio which I preferred to the original recipe I posted. I'll try it without the vermouth next...

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