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What Bourbon Did You Purchase Today, Summer 2019

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WhiskeyBlender
11 hours ago, EarthQuake said:

Hey Nancy, I love it when you post in such detail! Boy it would be great to try that 18/20 year old MGP on its own. I expect the 13 year is pretty good too.

 

I picked up a Magnus single barrel recently, the store didn't have any info on it but just going by taste it's pretty clear that it is Dickel (big vitamin note), usually I'm not a fan of Dickel but this is one of the best examples of their stuff I've had. Did you say at some point that you don't have anything to do with the single barrel picks?

@EarthQuake, always my pleasure! To be honest, when those older MGP barrels were 18 years old, I thought most of them were over-the-hill, but they really came back when they were 20 years old. Because of the evaporation rate and not knowing if they would get even better with age, I dumped a lot of those barrels and put them in demijohns (carboys) in order to "hold" the flavors right where they are. I held a few barrels back to see how they would age as they reach 21, 22, 23 years old, etc.

 

You can sort of think of its evolution and crest and troughs in the barrels as being much like that of Pappy 15, 20, and 23 year old bourbons. I personally love the 15 year, and I think that is the sweet spot for that particular bourbon. I like the 20, but I think the 23 yr tastes like antique oak and polished leather and is in a trough at that point in its maturation. 

 

And believe it or not, I actually preferred the MGP bourbon when it was still 12 years old. While I certainly like the 13 year, it is beginning to go into an oxidation cycle that it tends to be in for a few years. Also, a lot of these older MGP barrels (i.e. 12+ years) have fallen drastically in proof over the years. At most, they'll be at maybe 103, but a number of them have fallen below 100 proof, maybe even below 90.

 

Also, an interesting phenomenon known as "rancio" sometimes develops in these older barrels. Rancio is essentially the oxidized esters of fatty acids, and in the world of high-end French brandies (high quality Cognacs, Armagnac, etc.), a little bit of it is highly prized. I've noticed it already developing in some of the 13 year old stock, and very prevalent in the 20 year old. In bourbon, it takes on notes of blue cheese, and lots of nutty notes such as marzipan, grilled almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, etc. 

 

As for the Magnus single barrel picks, it is true that I usually am not involved with that, although occasionally when I'm in town and working at the distillery, I will help a group to pick a barrel. I really enjoy doing that, but it is usually something that has to be arranged well in advance to make sure I'll be there. I had a lot of fun when @flahute was in town and we did his barrel pick together. 

 

And on that note, yes, I have to admit that I'm usually not a big fan of the Dickel either. To my palate it tastes like a mix of Flintstones vitamins combined with butyric acid (think parmesan cheese and baby vomit), but occasionally there are some really nice barrels. I'm glad that you happened upon one of those! 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

Edited by WhiskeyBlender
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HoustonNit

Nancy is “Rancio” a French term, sounds Spanish? I wouldn’t mind trying some of these well aged French brandies with some rancio.

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kemosabe

Stocking up the bunker after not buying any bourbon for 5 months.  I noticed all prices have risen.  The BIB went from $37 to $40 & $45/bottle.  The BP is up to $80/bottle.   Pikesville is $40.  I turned down HMK10 @ $40, Blantons @ $70, ER @$40.  I saw @ 25 bottles of ECBP @ $60 - $65/bottle.  Bought none of those either.

 

I'm planning to whittle away at my bunker for 5-10 years and hope the glut of juice in the rickhouses cures the demand problem before I run dry.

 

 

IMG_1574.jpg

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Guss West

Same in New England, Kemosabe. 

I'm seeing 25%+ same store prices from two years ago. 

 

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Jazz June
3 hours ago, WhiskeyBlender said:

 

 

And believe it or not, I actually preferred the MGP bourbon when it was still 12 years old. While I certainly like the 13 year, it is beginning to go into an oxidation cycle that it tends to be in for a few years. Also, a lot of these older MGP barrels (i.e. 12+ years) have fallen drastically in proof over the years. At most, they'll be at maybe 103, but a number of them have fallen below 100 proof, maybe even below 90.

 

 

I've noticed that many MGP barrel proof releases are of lower proof than might be expected. Nancy, do you know what proof they went in the barrel at?

 

The other aspect that is hard to get a handle on is where all of these MGP barrels are aged - at MGP, a mix of MGP and their purchaser, or even all or mostly at the purchaser?

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fishnbowljoe
9 hours ago, Vosgar said:

I would love to do a barrel pick with Nancy!

Ditto. 👌

 

Biba! Joe

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WhiskeyBlender
3 hours ago, Jazz June said:

I've noticed that many MGP barrel proof releases are of lower proof than might be expected. Nancy, do you know what proof they went in the barrel at?

 

The other aspect that is hard to get a handle on is where all of these MGP barrels are aged - at MGP, a mix of MGP and their purchaser, or even all or mostly at the purchaser?

@Jazz June, MGP entry proof is 120. As for the 2nd part of your question, yes, some of those barrels are aged at the MGP campus in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and some have been housed elsewhere, either on site of the purchaser, or somewhere else where the purchaser might have a contract for maturing barrels. 

 

If the MGP barrel proof releases are lower than what you might expect, then that is probably a good indicator that they were matured at the MGP campus. The warehouses are concrete and are near a river, thus they get a lot of humidity and the conditions throughout the warehouses tend to be on the cooler side with more seasonal as opposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature fluctuations. Thus the proof tends to fall down over time even in the upper floors. 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

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Bret Bret
19 minutes ago, WhiskeyBlender said:

@Jazz June, MGP entry proof is 120. As for the 2nd part of your question, yes, some of those barrels are aged at the MGP campus in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and some have been housed elsewhere, either on site of the purchaser, or somewhere else where the purchaser might have a contract for maturing barrels. 

 

If the MGP barrel proof releases are lower than what you might expect, then that is probably a good indicator that they were matured at the MGP campus. The warehouses are concrete and are near a river, thus they get a lot of humidity and the conditions throughout the warehouses tend to be on the cooler side with more seasonal as opposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature fluctuations. Thus the proof tends to fall down over time even in the upper floors. 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

Nancy,

Thanks from many of us, just reading, for the insight, sharing of knowledge and candor.

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macdad

Drinking some WT101 tonight.  Man this is some tasty stuff!

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Jazz June
1 hour ago, WhiskeyBlender said:

@Jazz June, MGP entry proof is 120. As for the 2nd part of your question, yes, some of those barrels are aged at the MGP campus in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and some have been housed elsewhere, either on site of the purchaser, or somewhere else where the purchaser might have a contract for maturing barrels. 

 

If the MGP barrel proof releases are lower than what you might expect, then that is probably a good indicator that they were matured at the MGP campus. The warehouses are concrete and are near a river, thus they get a lot of humidity and the conditions throughout the warehouses tend to be on the cooler side with more seasonal as opposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature fluctuations. Thus the proof tends to fall down over time even in the upper floors. 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

Nancy,

 

Thank you so much for the answer. My favorite MGP distilled bourbon was an Old Scout barrel proof around 120, for which I believe a significant part of the aging occurred at Smooth Ambler. Other MGP distilled barrel proofs in the 100 to 105 range I usually find ok, but overall disappointing. I wonder if these were generally aged at MGP itself. It would be interesting to blind taste MGP aging versus aging of their distillate elsewhere, but this information isn't always easy to come by. Heck, aged barrel proof MGP bourbon isn't that easy to come by either. Maybe someone with a deeper bunker of MGP bourbon than me will undertake this in the name of bourbon science. :)

 

Here's another MGP question, they currently list five bourbon mash bills on their website:

 

75 corn/21 rye/4 barley

60 corn/36 rye/4 barley

51 corn/45 wheat/4 barley

51 corn/49 barley

99 corn/1 barley

 

The first three are a fairly standard rye bourbon, a high rye bourbon, and a wheated bourbon (albeit really high in wheat). But are there barrels of numbers four and five floating around? Have you worked with these at all?

On a related note, any thoughts on aging characteristics of different mash bills? I have read that wheaters take long aging better, but is there any generalization about regular rye versus a high rye? Or one of these very high barley or very high corn recipes?

Sorry to hit you with so many questions and thanks again for all of your awesome contributions to the board.

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Jazz June

Oh and to contribute to the actual thread, CEHT SiB tonight.

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macdad
42 minutes ago, macdad said:

Drinking some WT101 tonight.  Man this is some tasty stuff!

I'm an idiot and posted it in the wrong thread 😂  I haven't even had that much to drink...  Suppose I should read a little better!

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mbroo5880i
2 hours ago, WhiskeyBlender said:

@Jazz June, MGP entry proof is 120. As for the 2nd part of your question, yes, some of those barrels are aged at the MGP campus in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and some have been housed elsewhere, either on site of the purchaser, or somewhere else where the purchaser might have a contract for maturing barrels. 

 

If the MGP barrel proof releases are lower than what you might expect, then that is probably a good indicator that they were matured at the MGP campus. The warehouses are concrete and are near a river, thus they get a lot of humidity and the conditions throughout the warehouses tend to be on the cooler side with more seasonal as opposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature fluctuations. Thus the proof tends to fall down over time even in the upper floors. 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

Thank you for your insight!  I know SAOS had a 98 proof Barrel Strength Single Barrel several years ago that was from MGP.  I recall exchanging emails with their master distiller, John Little, who indicated they had come across a few stellar barrels below 100 proof.

 

I am confident that everyone on this board would love to do a barrel selection or have a tasting with you!  You could help us understand and identify what we are tasting.  

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Jazzhead
3 hours ago, Jazz June said:

Nancy,

 

Thank you so much for the answer. My favorite MGP distilled bourbon was an Old Scout barrel proof around 120, for which I believe a significant part of the aging occurred at Smooth Ambler. Other MGP distilled barrel proofs in the 100 to 105 range I usually find ok, but overall disappointing. I wonder if these were generally aged at MGP itself. It would be interesting to blind taste MGP aging versus aging of their distillate elsewhere, but this information isn't always easy to come by. Heck, aged barrel proof MGP bourbon isn't that easy to come by either. Maybe someone with a deeper bunker of MGP bourbon than me will undertake this in the name of bourbon science. :)

 

Here's another MGP question, they currently list five bourbon mash bills on their website:

 

75 corn/21 rye/4 barley

60 corn/36 rye/4 barley

51 corn/45 wheat/4 barley

51 corn/49 barley

99 corn/1 barley

 

The first three are a fairly standard rye bourbon, a high rye bourbon, and a wheated bourbon (albeit really high in wheat). But are there barrels of numbers four and five floating around? Have you worked with these at all?

On a related note, any thoughts on aging characteristics of different mash bills? I have read that wheaters take long aging better, but is there any generalization about regular rye versus a high rye? Or one of these very high barley or very high corn recipes?

Sorry to hit you with so many questions and thanks again for all of your awesome contributions to the board.

The high barley MGP recipe is used for Old Elk,  a Colorado company with which Greg Metze is involved.    From what I understand,  Metze laid down this high barley mashbill before he left MGP,  and the Old Elk iteration is at least a straight,  but in my view needs to be aged more.   Old Elk tastes like American craft,  with the sweet barley  landing it outside the classic bourbon profile.  But it is a good, valid pour that I recommend you try.   

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Jazzhead
On 8/10/2019 at 10:02 PM, WhiskeyBlender said:

@Jazzhead, that's a fantastic price for the Murray Hill Club blended bourbon. What batch did you get? I've modified the recipe somewhat to include more 13 and 20 year old bourbon and a bit less of the 10 year old light whiskey as of late. Would love to get your feedback on it. 

 

Cheers,

Nancy

It is batch 15, Nancy.   I've tried a fair number of your blends,  and I've got to say this is your acme.    To me,  the point of a blend is to strive for and achieve balance.  Balance is a wonderful thing.   It's the lack of balance that  eludes  most single barrels.   Kudos to the blending revolution in bourbon;  it's always been the norm for good scotch.    What I love about the Murray Hill is the roundness and heft of the blend;  it coats the tummy like a blanket on an early spring morning.    

 

I've been fortunate recently to enjoy the Remus Repeal Reserve I,  MGP's own blend of its mature whiskeys.    I think it's great,  have your tried it?

 

@WhiskeyBlender

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OldScoutGuy

We need a 'Dear Nancy' thread

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Galvin0791
3 hours ago, OldScoutGuy said:

We need a 'Dear Nancy' thread

Excellent idea!!

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GaryT

Damn social media is costing me money; 3 minutes on fb and saw a local store's posting of HMcK10 for $35.  Despite not having had a great experience in MY prior purchases, hoping a 'fresh' bottle will be better (and guessing the days of buying for sub-$40 are nearly gone).  Wound up picking up a Baker's for $48 just for good measure.

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kcgumbohead
55 minutes ago, GaryT said:

Damn social media is costing me money; 3 minutes on fb and saw a local store's posting of HMcK10 for $35.  Despite not having had a great experience in MY prior purchases, hoping a 'fresh' bottle will be better (and guessing the days of buying for sub-$40 are nearly gone).  Wound up picking up a Baker's for $48 just for good measure.

I did have a great experience with HMcK either so I'll enjoy this vicariously through you Gary.  In other news I purchased a WTRB as a gift, my current center of the universe where cost, taste, overall satisfaction and general bourbon zen converge. I hope and expect the recipient will agree.

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FacePlant

 

I keep stocking up so when I cut loose and jump off this wagon I can do it with GUSTO. 

 

IMG_1248.thumb.JPG.f66e10dbed1528f09bf6529f1f1b7106.JPG

 

I would be interest in hearing opinions on this wheater from those that have tried it. The published mash bill is wheat/malt/corn/rye at 52/20/20/8. I am going to assume the "malt" is barley. 

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Galvin0791

Thanks to a tip from Vosgar, I brought home some goodies today.

:D

20190816_162337.jpg

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JCwhammie

I picked the last bottle of RRSiB PS warehouse F. The store recently got a barrel of A picked in 2019. I asked the whiskey guy if it's CN A or Tyrone A. He said he didnt know. I assume that it's CN since everything I've seen from RR this year has been from CN, so I passed. The bottle of CNA that I have just doesnt hit the spot like the other warehouses. 

 

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lcpfratn
Thanks to a tip from Vosgar, I brought home some goodies today.
[emoji3]
20190816_162337.thumb.jpg.00929f8833377f5ba0fa3874f07f1be2.jpg

Wow, that was one fantastic tip!
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The Black Tot
On 8/15/2019 at 5:48 PM, kemosabe said:

I'm planning to whittle away at my bunker for 5-10 years and hope the glut of juice in the rickhouses cures the demand problem before I run dry.

 

^Wise man right here.

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fishnbowljoe
3 hours ago, Galvin0791 said:

Thanks to a tip from Vosgar, I brought home some goodies today.

:D

20190816_162337.jpg

 

1 hour ago, lcpfratn said:


Wow, that was one fantastic tip!

Yes it was.

 

Also thanks to a tip from Vosgar, I brought home some goodies too. 👍

 

Biba! Joe

rw.jpeg

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