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bourbonv

Any Guesses?

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bourbonv

In the years before prohibition, which state had the most registered distilleries? I will give you a hint, It was not Kentucky.

Mike Veach

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Gillman

I was going to say Pennsylvania, but recalling that probably many distilleries were making spirits and non-straight whisky and were established in the more industrialised areas, I'll go out on a limb and say, Ohio.

Gary

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bourbonv

Sorry Gary, Try again. It is not Kentucky or Ohio.

Mike Veach

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tdelling

My guess is Illinois, based on the (now long gone) bunch of distilleries

in Peoria.

Tim Dellinger

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pepcycle

Missouri?

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bourbonv

Sorry Tim,

We can rule out Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois.

Mike Veach

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bourbonv

Sorry Ed,

It is not Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois or Missouri.

Mike Veach

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pepcycle

Maryland?

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bourbonv

Sorry Ed,

Not Maryland either. Try again.

Mike Veach

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musher

Virginia?

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bourbonv

Sorry Mike,

It is not Virginia either. We only have 48 to choose from so we are narrowing it down.

Mike Veach

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musher

OK, then. I'll go out on a limb and make my final guess of California. If that isn't it, I'll let others have at it.

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bourbonv

California is a good guess, but wrong. They did have a thriving distilling industry making brandy for the most part, but it did not have the most registered distilleries.

Mike Veach

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clayton

Tennessee?

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bourbonv

Sorry its not Tennessee. Tennessee actually one of the states with the fewest distilleries and they closed in 1910 when state prohibition came about.

So summing up we know it was not Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Maryland, California or Tennessee. Alaska and Hawaii can also be ruled out since they were not states at the time.

Any other guesses.

Mike Veach

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Speedy_John

Well, I'm going with Gary's first instinct, which was mine also--Pennsylvania.

SpeedyJohn

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dgonano

Since New York was and still is well known for apple, grape and rye production, that would be my choice.

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OneCubeOnly

I'll guess West Virginia--based solely on their thriving POST-prohibition moonshine trade!?

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bourbonv

Sorry, Try again. It is not West Virginia.

Mike Veach

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bourbonv

Interesting guess, but wrong. It was not New York.

Mike Veach

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bourbonv

This does seem to be the next logical choice after Kentucky, but it is wrong.

It is not Pennsylvania.

Mike Veach

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dgonano

Well Indiana had a few. This is my last guess, ... maybe.

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bourbonv

Sorry, It is not Indiana.

Another clue is this state had the only 4 digit DSP numbers I ever saw.

Mike Veach

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musher

Another clue is this state had the only 4 digit DSP numbers I ever saw.

Mike Veach

Those numbers are given out sequentially within a given state, starting with "1", right?

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TNbourbon

My first instinct was toward Indiana, but since you've already counted the Hoosiers out, let me go off another direction:

There seems to be a lot of grain in the upper Midwest, from which I know a large percentage of domestic 'grain neutral spirits" (read that 'vodka') comes, so let me say, oh -- Minnesota.

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