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Any Guesses?


bourbonv
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This is correct. If the state had more than one district, then there could be multiple DSP No. 1 distilleries in the same state.

Mike Veach

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Another clue is this state had the only 4 digit DSP numbers I ever saw.

Okay, here's my last shot at it: having no knowledge of how DSP numbers work, I'll guess a 4-letter state to correspond with a 4 digit DSP: I'll guess Iowa.

Lots of corn there which needed facilitated transport down the Mississippi!?

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Iowa, Lots of corn, but not distilleries. Try again. Let see, we have ruled out:

Alaska

Hawaii

Kentucky

Ohio

Illinois

Missouri

California

Tennessee

New York

Pennsylvania

Maryland

Indiana

Minnisota

Iowa

Virginia

West Virginia

The list is getting short of available states. Keep trying.

Mike Veach

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Not to complain, or anything, but since I'm a life-long resident of the state, I've got to defend its honor. Twice now, you've misspelled its name (Minnesotta and Minnisota).

The correct spelling is Minnesota!

Now that I've got that out of the way . . . .

Back to the guessing! grin.gif

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Interesting guess. They had some rum and gin distilleries in that area, but not that many.

Mike Veach

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My apologies. I never learned to type and sometimes the keys don't seem to work right. I will try to do better.

Mike Veach

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We ahve a winner folks! The state of North Carolina had more registered distilleries than any other state prior to prohibition. According to the Microfilm sent to me at U.D. there were only a couple of districts and each had over a thousand distilleries, but few of them had a capacity of over three barrels a day. It seems that this was a pot still whiskey state.

The big distributing company in the state was Casper's Whiskey with the colbalt blue bottles.

Mike Veach

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I just read a story on this.

North Carolina may have had the most distilleries, but I think Maryland was the largest producer of spirit for the young nation, from the Whiskey Rebellion to Prohibition. Rye grew very well in Maryland's fields.

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From my readings, an estimated 20,000 distilleries could be found in the U.S. in 1830. Most were small pot stilled. The reason was barrelled whiskey was more cost effective to ship than barrelled grain. Also many wholesalers, in Baltimore and other seaports, shipped many farm supplies throughout the country and were repaid in liquified grain.

The wholesalers became grocers( meaning they sold whiskey )

and registered themselves as distillers.

I should let our bourbon historians do the reporting but I believe Pennsylvania and Maryland,in that order, were a distant second and third behind Kentucky in whiskey produced before Prohibition.

Also Maryland rye grain was excellent but apparently wild onion intruded into the grainfields. Many Maryland distillery records indicate the preferance for New York and Wisconsin rye in the recipe.

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