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garbanzobean

Drinking High West Revelation Rum batch 2 again. Really great stuff. If I thought I'd be going through this at anything other than a snail's pace, I'd definitely buy another.

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ChainWhip
Drinking High West Revelation Rum batch 2 again. Really great stuff. If I thought I'd be going through this at anything other than a snail's pace, I'd definitely buy another.

High West? Didn't know they made a rum... :)

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Max Power
High West? Didn't know they made a rum... :)

I've got a bottle too (SA of course...get your shit straight garbanzo). It seems like it would mix really well at 99 proof. It will take me a while to get through it, but it's a nice bottle.

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garbanzobean
High West? Didn't know they made a rum... :)
dagnabbit, I do that at least once a week and then have to edit my posts. Maybe the fact that there are two really good NDPs out there causes cognitive dissonance.

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sailor22

A couple of very interesting developments in the Rum world last week. This fellow,-- https://www.facebook.com/johnny.drejer.1/media_set?set=a.10201490978693425.1073741854.1144913552&type=3&__mref=message_bubble -- Johnny Drejer broke cover with his technique for measuring the amount of sugar added to Rums. Take a seat, it's even more shocking than you thought. A lot of red faced producers who have consistently been denying adding sugar are suddenly very quiet. Some interesting results - once again Clement looks like the poster child for not adding sugar and so does Matusalem, although we know they infuse prune into the spirit at some point. The Z's and l Dorado are positively loaded with it.

Quite a few also use GNS and grain whiskey according to a producer I spoke to recently. The procedure goes something like this; Distill cheap molasses (bitter) as cheaply as possible, then add cheap GNS or grain whiskey to the product to cut the bitterness an make it "smoother" and more palatable, then add sugar until it is drinkable. The result has that balance of sweet and bitter we associate with popular Demerara rums. Mix it up and add just a little bit of older stock and call it solara aged. I want to point out that grain whiskey produced from a coffey still and probably from other types of column stills is very sweet. Of course any other flavors that are part of "the old family recipe" can be infused or added at any point in the process. Prune, Raisin, Vanilla, Orange, Pineapple and Clove are were apparently popular in the "old families".

Then Bryan Davis announces his Accelerated Aging Reactor (unfortunately it was announced initially on April 1st and was thought to be an April Fools joke - it's not) that he says will revolutionize the production of Rum and spirits in general. Well, if it's only half as special as he says it is it may be a game changer for the craft spirits industry. See story here -- http://www.wired.com/2015/04/lost-spirits/ --. I'll get to taste some of the product in Miami next week, and do a side by side with naturally aged 20yr Demerara Rum. Although to be really fair the same original distillate should be used for both products that simply isn't possible.

If the reactor can make a product that closely mirrors a 20yr Rum in only 6 days does that make the existing stocks sitting in barrels in the Caribbean and Europe more or less valuable?

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Paddy

If the reactor can make a product that closely mirrors a 20yr Rum in only 6 days does that make the existing stocks sitting in barrels in the Caribbean and Europe more or less valuable?

I'm gonna go out on a limb and say the price on the old stocks would skyrocket (after sailing around the world on a boat in order to introduce the elements of the sea to ultra old aged no longer available anywhere else get it while it lasts ).:grin:

#onceit'sgoneit'sgone:lol:

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tanstaafl2
A couple of very interesting developments in the Rum world last week. This fellow,-- https://www.facebook.com/johnny.drejer.1/media_set?set=a.10201490978693425.1073741854.1144913552&type=3&__mref=message_bubble -- Johnny Drejer broke cover with his technique for measuring the amount of sugar added to Rums. Take a seat, it's even more shocking than you thought. A lot of red faced producers who have consistently been denying adding sugar are suddenly very quiet. Some interesting results - once again Clement looks like the poster child for not adding sugar and so does Matusalem, although we know they infuse prune into the spirit at some point. The Z's and l Dorado are positively loaded with it.

Quite a few also use GNS and grain whiskey according to a producer I spoke to recently. The procedure goes something like this; Distill cheap molasses (bitter) as cheaply as possible, then add cheap GNS or grain whiskey to the product to cut the bitterness an make it "smoother" and more palatable, then add sugar until it is drinkable. The result has that balance of sweet and bitter we associate with popular Demerara rums. Mix it up and add just a little bit of older stock and call it solara aged. I want to point out that grain whiskey produced from a coffey still and probably from other types of column stills is very sweet. Of course any other flavors that are part of "the old family recipe" can be infused or added at any point in the process. Prune, Raisin, Vanilla, Orange, Pineapple and Clove are were apparently popular in the "old families".

Then Bryan Davis announces his Accelerated Aging Reactor (unfortunately it was announced initially on April 1st and was thought to be an April Fools joke - it's not) that he says will revolutionize the production of Rum and spirits in general. Well, if it's only half as special as he says it is it may be a game changer for the craft spirits industry. See story here -- http://www.wired.com/2015/04/lost-spirits/ --. I'll get to taste some of the product in Miami next week, and do a side by side with naturally aged 20yr Demerara Rum. Although to be really fair the same original distillate should be used for both products that simply isn't possible.

If the reactor can make a product that closely mirrors a 20yr Rum in only 6 days does that make the existing stocks sitting in barrels in the Caribbean and Europe more or less valuable?

Sounds quite interesting. I look forward to your report on the Lost Spirits reactor!

I could not get the Facebook link to work but here is the link to Johnny Drejer website. Barbancourt was one rum I didn't recall seeing on his list of tested rums. That Lost Spirits tested low on sugar was interesting as well.

Also some interesting commentary on the subject from Richard Seale, a rum distiller from Barbados. Of note his rums have negligible sugar (Barbados doesn't permit sugar in rums made there as I understand it, rather like the agricoles from the French Islands such as Martinique.

Edited by tanstaafl2

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sailor22

Tried the Lost Spirits Cuban Inspired Rum last night - Tastes of feinty new make with a helping of peaty smoke and a giant squirt of what tastes like artificial butterscotch flavoring. Very unbalanced without any integration of the flavors. One of the tasters tried it in a rum and coke and said it ruined the coke. Made a ginger ale and rum with it and we poured it out it was so bad. I honestly don't think I will ever open the bottle again unless I want to insult a guest at some point. I know this isn't made with his new reactor thingy but it certainly doesn't bode well. Three tasters and three giant thumbs down. Just for fun I compared it directly agains a Havana Club 7ry Cuban Rum. No comparison, the Havana Club was positively heavenly compared to the Lost Spirits, and I previously considered the Havana Club a pretty average Rum.

Spend your money on something else, anything else.

Edited by sailor22

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Old Dusty
Tried the Lost Spirits Cuban Inspired Rum last night - Tastes of feinty new make with a helping of peaty smoke and a giant squirt of what tastes like artificial butterscotch flavoring. Very unbalanced without any integration of the flavors. One of the tasters tried it in a rum and coke and said it ruined the coke. Made a ginger ale and rum with it and we poured it out it was so bad. I honestly don't think I will ever open the bottle again unless I want to insult a guest at some point. I know this isn't made with his new reactor thingy but it certainly doesn't bode well. Three tasters and three giant thumbs down. Just for fun I compared it directly agains a Havana Club 7ry Cuban Rum. No comparison, the Havana Club was positively heavenly compared to the Lost Spirits, and I previously considered the Havana Club a pretty average Rum.

Spend your money on something else, anything else.

Exhibit #3897 on the fallacy of aging shortcuts. It's modern alchemy. Ignore and drink sprits actually aged in full sized wooden barrels preferably charred.

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sailor22

It was a good day of Rum sipping ....

post-4064-14489822250809_thumb.jpg

post-4064-14489822250809_thumb.jpg

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The Black Tot

Nicely done, Sailor22. And thanks very much for the much-needed review of the Lost Spirits situation. I've been putting off doing the test myself, figuring "what's the rush? They can make more every 7 days"

I appreciate being saved the time and expense.

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tanstaafl2
It was a good day of Rum sipping ....

I do love that Plantation Guadeloupe, sugar be damned!

Sad to hear the Lost Spirits Cuban style is a disaster. The Lost Spirits Navy Style was fairly decent but I will pass on the Cuban one. Will still be curious to hear what you think of the true "reactor" rum if you get to try it.

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BFerguson

Rhum agricole blanc. Oddity for sure. But with warmer weather upon us, I finally stumbled upon a source, likely limited, for my current preferred blanc by Rhum JM.

Sucker for the odd and flavorful I guess.

B

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johnnyoski

Picked up a bottle of Zaya Gran Reserva for $30. A very smooth sipper but the vanilla borderlines on overkill....and that statement is coming from someone who enjoys vanilla in just about anything.

Still pretty darn good and glad I added it to my meager rum collection.

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tanstaafl2
I thought the same thing upon my first taste of Zaya. It was a lot like when I tried straight vanilla extract as a kid: too potent to be appreciated. I recognize the fact that most rums have flavorings added, but the Zaya formulation borders on overkill.

That makes me wonder about Guatemalan Zaya. Was it virtually the same product as Trinidadian Zaya or considerably different?

Edited by tanstaafl2

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sailor22

Had an opportunity to taste the new Lost Spirits Rum produced by Davis's new reactor. It's a big step forward from his previous efforts and tasted in isolation seemed to be a fair copy of an aged Demerara. Our little tasting group was split, the people who preferred sweet rums were not impressed, those of us who like woody spirits thought it was OK but nothing we would run out and buy. He was only able to bring part of one bottle so I'm guessing the second run wasn't as successful.

A couple that impressed were the Real McCoy 12yr and Richard Seal's sherry barrel finished. I'm not sure what label the finished will be sold under but it will be very limited as there isn't much available. Mt. Gay's Black barrel was a solid honest Rum at a great price point.

With all the added flavors many were closer to a liqueur than a real rum, nothing new in that trend I suppose. Still disappointing however.

The Opthimus line is sweet, delicious and easy drinking along the lines of the Plantation 20th. It's not a $150 ultra aged premium however. Somehow adding more sweetener and a dubious age statement has become synonymous with added value in Rum and they are riding the wave.

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tanstaafl2
A couple that impressed were the Real McCoy 12yr and Richard Seal's sherry barrel finished. I'm not sure what label the finished will be sold under but it will be very limited as there isn't much available. Mt. Gay's Black barrel was a solid honest Rum at a great price point.

With all the added flavors many were closer to a liqueur than a real rum, nothing new in that trend I suppose. Still disappointing however.

The Opthimus line is sweet, delicious and easy drinking along the lines of the Plantation 20th. It's not a $150 ultra aged premium however. Somehow adding more sweetener and a dubious age statement has become synonymous with added value in Rum and they are riding the wave.

The Doorly's XO from Seale is a nice and relatively inexpensive rum (NAS but thought to be around 6 years old) with about a year of Oloroso Sherry finish included. I presume the Sherry finish you note is something different?

Not too surprising that The Real McCoy 12yo (apparently there are a 3yo and 5yo as well) is decent as that is made in at Foursquare in Barbados by Seale as well. I would think it and the relatively inexpensive Seale's 10yo would be similar.

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tanstaafl2
Had an opportunity to taste the new Lost Spirits Rum produced by Davis's new reactor. It's a big step forward from his previous efforts and tasted in isolation seemed to be a fair copy of an aged Demerara. Our little tasting group was split, the people who preferred sweet rums were not impressed, those of us who like woody spirits thought it was OK but nothing we would run out and buy. He was only able to bring part of one bottle so I'm guessing the second run wasn't as successful.

If a good older Dememrara that had not been heavily sweetened cost $100+ and you could get the "Reactor rum" for say $20 or less would you be more inclined to get it? I suppose that would be the real test!

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AaronWF

I participated in a rum tasting last summer and found I really enjoyed the agricole profile. I found it less sweet and purer tasting than the other rums and I found that the earthy grassiness note brought a 3-dimensional complexity to it.

When I went to look for rhum agricole with some age on it, I learned that Binny's had tried to ride a wave of popularity around the mid-'00s but found that it mostly languished on the shelves and they were not going to focus much on it going forward. There were a few unaged agricoles on the shelf, but what interested me so much about the aged ones was that the grassy character was not all absorbed by the wood.

A few weeks ago I managed to track down some 1997 Rhum J.M. and just last weekend I found a Cuvée Homère Clément. The '97 J.M. was tasty but a bit disappointing; I felt that the grassiness - while still present - had been largely edged out and it made for a sweeter and less complex pour. I opened the Homère this past weekend and was delighted to find it to be everything I was looking for in an aged agricole: spicy and fruity with a sprinkling of vanilla balanced by a satisfyingly bold grassiness.

Thanks to a fellow SB'er, I had a sample of a Clément 10yo single cask to taste against the Homère. The single cask - while CS at 46-47% - hit like a CS bourbon, but finished a bit clumsily. The Homère did not have the aggressive palate of the single cask, but SBS, the advantages of the blender's hand were very apparent in the cuvée.

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unclebunk

Nice post, Aaron. I've got a bottle of Clement 6 YO beckoning at the moment but was waiting to finish off the Clement VSOP which I've quite enjoyed. Cheers!

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scubadoo97
Had an opportunity to taste the new Lost Spirits Rum produced by Davis's new reactor. It's a big step forward from his previous efforts and tasted in isolation seemed to be a fair copy of an aged Demerara. Our little tasting group was split, the people who preferred sweet rums were not impressed, those of us who like woody spirits thought it was OK but nothing we would run out and buy. He was only able to bring part of one bottle so I'm guessing the second run wasn't as successful.

A couple that impressed were the Real McCoy 12yr and Richard Seal's sherry barrel finished. I'm not sure what label the finished will be sold under but it will be very limited as there isn't much available. Mt. Gay's Black barrel was a solid honest Rum at a great price point.

With all the added flavors many were closer to a liqueur than a real rum, nothing new in that trend I suppose. Still disappointing however.

The Opthimus line is sweet, delicious and easy drinking along the lines of the Plantation 20th. It's not a $150 ultra aged premium however. Somehow adding more sweetener and a dubious age statement has become synonymous with added value in Rum and they are riding the wave.

My wife liked the Opthimus Sherry finished and didn't understand why I thought $150 was a bit steep for a bottle of rum.

I was not impressed Davis's Lost spirit selection. He has more work to do IMO. Having not sampled his previous efforts I have nothing to compare it to to see how his process has improved

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scubadoo97

Correction. She liked the port finished but still?

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sailor22

Correction - The Foursquare bottle that I found intriguing was a Port finish expression, not a Sherry finish.

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bmajazz

I just picked up a Cruzan single barrel from around 2000 or so. Curious to see how it is.

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sailor22

While visiting the Miami Rum Fest it was clear that the classifications of the Rum being judged were senseless and in fact were probably completely driven by marketing departments of large manufacturers. Wouldn't you think that classifying any Rum that has something added as Flavored Rum accurate? So any Rum with sugar added would be classified as a flavored Rum.

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