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Did your brining yesterday for two hours before grilling the thin cut Sam's Club porkchops. They cooked up quickly (about 4-5 minutes a side) and then we cut the bones away to make porkchop sandwiches with a bit of BBQ sauce and freshly-made coleslaw on top. Juicy and delicious, as you said. Everybody loved 'em!

I am glad you had success with the chops and honored that you tried my technique. Brining works wonders with lean cuts of meat including boneless skinless chicken breasts. I get a lot of my ideas from the great guys on smokingmeatforums.com.

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Not on the smoker, but the first strawberry pie of the spring. We have an amazing local farm that has their own store for their home grown fruits and vegetables. In the spring we buy strawberries. And

So we put a pergola on our deck a few years ago which I put a roof on after a couple of years.  This has become my winter grilling/smoking area.  I usually hang tarps for additional shelter.  I have a

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I am glad you had success with the chops and honored that you tried my technique. Brining works wonders with lean cuts of meat including boneless skinless chicken breasts. I get a lot of my ideas from the great guys on smokingmeatforums.com.
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I'm more of a griller than a smoker, but last weekend I smoked a chuck roast and then used it to make beef/vegetable soup. this weekend I'm doing a rump roast and plan on using it to make chili.

Enjoying some WT RR 101 while going back and forth between the grill and the computer.

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I'm more of a griller than a smoker, but last weekend I smoked a chuck roast and then used it to make beef/vegetable soup. this weekend I'm doing a rump roast and plan on using it to make chili.

Enjoying some WT RR 101 while going back and forth between the grill and the computer.

Some of my favorite times are in the summer sitting outside with a nice glass of bourbon and a good cigar while babysitting my smoker. I have never had any luck smoking rump roasts, let us know how yours turned out.

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Some of my favorite times are in the summer sitting outside with a nice glass of bourbon and a good cigar while babysitting my smoker. I have never had any luck smoking rump roasts, let us know how yours turned out.

Cooked it at 220 for a couple hours. Pulled it off at an internal temp of 145. After resting I sliced enough off for two sandwiches and used the meat to make chili the next day, sliced it and then diced the slices. the sandwiches and the chili were good

I wouldn't say I smoked it. More like slow roasted. As the meat lost moisture and began to firm up I got nervous and decided to take it off when it was a little more than medium rare. Did the same thing with the chuck roast last week.

What's the deal. How do you guys cook something for so many hours and get it to fall apart like a pot roast that's been in a crock pot all day, without it getting dry. I gotta admit I'm totally confused about this.

Edited by ILLfarmboy
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Cooked it at 220 for a couple hours. Pulled it off at an internal temp of 145. After resting I sliced enough off for two sandwiches and used the meat to make chili the next day, sliced it and then diced the slices. the sandwiches and the chili were good

I wouldn't say I smoked it. More like slow roasted. As the meat lost moisture and began to firm up I got nervous and decided to take it off when it was a little more than medium rare. Did the same thing with the chuck roast last week.

What's the deal. How do you guys cook something for so many hours and get it to fall apart like a pot roast that's been in a crock pot all day, without it getting dry. I gotta admit I'm totally confused about this.

I have my best results when smoking cuts that have some fat running through them. I like to smoke pork butts, spare ribs, and beef brisket. These cuts have fat in them while rump roasts and pork loins are fairly lean. When you smoke the fattier cuts of meat low and slow you give the meat muscles time to break down while the surrounding fat helps keep it moist. The slow roasting was probably the best method for the rump roast along with not letting the IT get over 145.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I like smoking, slow roasting and drying hot peppers that I grind up and use throughout the year.

I use hickory chunks in a Weber, move the coals to one side and put the peppers on the cool side. Some get roasted more than others and they all taste fantastic.

The smoky flavor is incredible and we put it in soups, chowders, pizza, baked beans, you name it. I eat some every day. I made a sauce to drizzle on pan seared tuna steaks (rare) with toasted sesame oil, tamari, rice wine vinegar, mirin and some of this ground smoked pepper and it was one of the best things I ate all year.

Here's a pic of some before and after smoking/roasting. It's hard to tell from the crappy iPhone pic but they get this beautiful patina, like lacquered red leather.

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If you have some time to kill on the grill, toss a few peppers on there and smoke 'em up.

Cheers!

Edited by Luna56
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  • 2 months later...

What temp do you smoke them at?

I did some jalapeños a long time ago and they didn't dry out but were very smokey and not in a good way

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  • 3 months later...

It was so nice outside today I decided to smoke a chicken. I used my Weber kettle grill instead of firing up my big smoker for one yardbird. Sitting outside with a cigar and a bourbon and coke while tending the smoker is one of my favorite summertime activities. I smoked it for about 2 1/2 hours at 300. The skin was crisp, the darkness was the spice rub which blackened during the smoke. The skin on the legs pulled back while smoking which made for an ugly bird but the end result tasted great. I paired the smoked chicken with some red beans and rice.

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I tried to smoke half a turkey breast in the old flowerpot on Saturday. Thought 6 hrs at 200-250 would be enough, but it wasn't and I had to finish it up in the oven. Took longer than expected there too. I was afraid it would dry by the time it made it to a safe internal temp, but it was perfect. Cut it up and made burritos. As my daughter said, it was "Delishush".

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Recent app night to go with some Manhattans and Old Fashioneds.

1) ABT (atomic buffalo turds) - jalapenos cored and sliced lengthwise. Stuffed with cream cheese, finely shredded cheddar, bbq rub, garlic, pepper mixture and topped with 1/3 slice of bacon. Smoked until bacon is crisp with apple wood.

2) Smoked Wings. Wing tips off. Basic BBQ rub. Apple wood smoked until skin crisp and fat rendered at about 325. Sauced and put back on the smoker for ten minutes

Sauce- 1/3 cup melted butter, 1/3 cup honey, 1/3 cup Siracha sauce heated and thoroughly mixed

Both were outstanding with cocktails.

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I've been curing a 5 lb slab of pork belly for a week. Trying a maple cure this time (salt, curing salt, dark brown sugar, and maple syrup). Going to smoke it Sunday with hickory and apple wood.

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I've been curing a 5 lb slab of pork belly for a week. Trying a maple cure this time (salt, curing salt, dark brown sugar, and maple syrup). Going to smoke it Sunday with hickory and apple wood.

dave wonder how some Maple Crown would work in that cure?

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steeltownbbq

Anybody ever try smoking corned beef brisket? I'm thinking its basically just a heavily marinated brisket. Anyway - I'm going to give it a try on Sunday.

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I've heard that doesn't go too well, unless you're expecting smokey corned beef. Then it probably works awesomely.

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I have been recovering from eye surgeries (lens replacement in both eyes); last night was my first cookout for the past few weeks.

I decided to try a different cooking method for my chicken pieces on my large Big Green Egg. I have been getting pretty good results cooking directly over the fire at 400F for about 20 to 24 minutes. However, the last time one of those huge modern chicken breasts (one of my pet peeves) did not get completely done and had to be finished in the microwave. So this time I cooked them indirect at 350-375F for one hour. Man, they were good! Perfectly crispy brown on the outside and thoroughly roasted and juicy on the inside.

The seasoning I used as a dry rub was Cajun Injector lemon pepper seasoning.

Tim

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Congrats on the new lenses Tim. Cools stuff. Sky's a bit bluer these days

Some spares went on the smoker this morning. They were good

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Anybody ever try smoking corned beef brisket? I'm thinking its basically just a heavily marinated brisket. Anyway - I'm going to give it a try on Sunday.

I have done it many times. It is quite good. I put cold water in a large stainless pot and soak the corned beef for 2-3 hours and change the water each hour. Then I pat the meat dry with paper towels. Next a place a healthy dose of garlic powder and fresh cracked pepper on the outside. I smoke until it reaches 150-160 internal and then foil until it hits 190 internal. It is usually very tender but still sliceable at this point. I then let it rest about 40 minutes uncovered and then slice thin. It is now Pastrami! (smoked corned meat) Some people like the rub to be ground corriander and pepper. Give it a try!

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dave wonder how some Maple Crown would work in that cure?

Interesting thought, though I'm not sure I'd have much use for the leftover Maple Crown. I thought about throwing some bourbon in there, but sorta doubt you'd be able to detect it after being smoked.

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Interesting thought, though I'm not sure I'd have much use for the leftover Maple Crown. I thought about throwing some bourbon in there, but sorta doubt you'd be able to detect it after being smoked.
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Last night I butterflied a pork tenderloin, stuffed with sour cream, jalapenos, and cheddar cheese. I closed it back up and wrapped it in bacon and threw it on the Big Green Egg with a little Mesquite and Apple wood smoke. Finished with indirect heat. Made a fantastic dinner, the bacon and pork took the smoke nicely, but it was not over the top. Definitely one to try again.

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fishnbowljoe

My wife and I just bought our son and DIL a present. The pic below shows it in use.

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